September 26, 2016

United States to Host Switzerland in First Round Of Davis Cup in February

USDavisCup

UNITED STATES TO HOST SWITZERLAND  

IN THE 2017 DAVIS CUP BY BNP PARIBAS

WORLD GROUP FIRST ROUND THIS FEBRUARY

USTA: WHITE PLAINS, NY, September 22, 2016 — The United States Davis Cup Team will host Switzerland in the 2017 Davis Cup by BNP Paribas World Group First Round, February 3-5, at a site to be determined. The International Tennis Federation announced the draw for the 2017 World Group today in London. Switzerland is seeded No. 5, while the United States is unseeded. The U.S. reached the World Group Quarterfinals this year, defeating Australia in Melbourne in March and falling to 2016 Davis Cup finalist Croatia in July in Portland, Ore.

The United States holds a 3-1 record over Switzerland in Davis Cup competition. The two countries last met in 2012, in a World Group First Round tie played in Fribourg, Switzerland, where the U.S. team of Mardy Fish, John Isner, Mike Bryan, and Ryan Harrison swept Switzerland, 5-0, with a Swiss team comprising of both Roger Federer and Stan Wawrinka.   

The United States will host back-to-back Davis Cup and Fed Cup ties next February, as the United States hosts Germany in the Fed Cup by BNP Paribas World Group First Round, February 11-12. With these draws, there is the possibility of hosting both reigning US Open singles champions in the United States for Davis Cup and Fed Cup, as Stan Wawrinka (Switzerland) and Angelique Kerber (Germany) are each their country’s top players, as well as five-time US Open champion Roger Federer.  

Founded in 1900, Davis Cup is the world’s largest annual international men’s team competition.  The U.S. leads all nations with 32 Davis Cup titles. The United States holds a 216-70 all-time Davis Cup record and owns the longest uninterrupted run in the World Group, dating back to 1989.  Wilson is the official ball of the U.S. Davis Cup team.

For more information, including access to player and historical Davis Cup records, please go to www.usta.com/daviscup or www.daviscup.com. Follow the U.S. Davis Cup Team on Twitter @USDavisCupTeam. For Fed Cup information, visit www.usta.com/fedcup or www.fedcup.com. Follow the U.S. Fed Cup Team on Twitter @USFedCupTeam.

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Draws Made for 2017 Davis Cup

 

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(September 22, 2016) The Draw for the 2017 Davis Cup by BNP Paribas was held at the BNP Paribas offices in London on Thursday.

 

Individual draws were made for the 2017 World Group, Americas Zone Groups I and II, Asia/Oceania Zone Groups I and II, and Europe/Africa Zone Groups I and II.

 

The 2017 World Group dates are as follows:

 

World Group first round: 3-5 February

World Group quarterfinals: 7-9 April

World Group semifinals and play-offs: 15-17 September

World Group Final: 24-26 November

 

The 2016 Davis Cup by BNP Paribas Final between Croatia and Argentina will take place in Croatia on 25-27 November, with the venue to be confirmed in due course.

 

2017 Draws

 

World Group

 

First round (3-5 February)

 

Argentina [s] [c] v Italy

Germany [c] v Belgium [s]

Australia [c] v Czech Republic [s]

USA [c] v Switzerland [s]

Japan [c] v France [s]

Canada [c] [*] v Great Britain [s]

Serbia [s] [c] v Russia

Croatia [s] [c] v Spain
Americas Zone Group I

 

First round (3-5 February)

 

Brazil [s] v Bye

Ecuador [c] v Peru

Winner of Barbados v Dominican Republic v Chile

Colombia [s] v Bye
Asia/Oceania Zone Group I

 

First round (3-5 February)

 

Kazakhstan [s] v Bye

Chinese Taipei [c] v China P.R.

Korea, Rep. [c] v Uzbekistan

India [s] [c] v New Zealand
Europe/Africa Zone Group I

 

First round (3-5 February)

 

Slovakia [s] v Bye

Hungary v Bye

Netherlands [s] Bye

Bosnia/Herzegovina [c] [*] [^] v Poland

Belarus [c] v Romania

Austria [s] v Bye

Winner of Israel v Sweden v Portugal

Ukraine [s] v Bye

 

Americas Zone Group II

 

First round (3-5 February)

 

Loser of Barbados v Dominican Republic [s] v Paraguay

Guatemala [c] v Mexico [s]

El Salvador [s] [c] v Bolivia

Bahamas [c] v Venezuela [s]
Asia/Oceania Zone Group II

 

First round (3-5 February)

 

Pakistan [s] [c] v Iran

Vietnam [s] [c] [*] v Hong Kong, China

Philippines [s] [c] v Indonesia

Kuwait [c] v Thailand [s]

 

Europe/Africa Zone Group II

 

First round (3-5 February)

 

Loser of Israel v Sweden [s] v Tunisia

Cyprus [c] [*] v Turkey [s]

Madagascar [c] [*] v Lithuania [s]

Georgia [c] [*] v Finland [s]

Latvia [s] [c] [*] v Norway

Denmark [s] [c] v Morocco

South Africa [s] [c] [*] v Estonia

Slovenia [s] [c] Monaco

 

Key
[s] = Seeded nation

[c] = Choice of ground

[*] = Choice of ground decided by lot

[^] = Choice of ground reversed by Davis Cup Committee

 

The home nation is listed first for each tie.

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Constant Lestienne Suspended and Fined for Gambling on Tennis

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From the Tennis Integrity Unit: (September 21, 2016) French tennis player Constant Lestienne has been suspend for seven months and fined $10,000 after admitting to charges of betting on tennis.

 

Half of the period of ineligibility (3 months and 2 weeks) is suspended on condition that he commits no further offences under the Tennis Anti-Corruption Program (TACP).

 

$5,000 of the $10,000 fine will be considered paid in full providing Mr Lestienne gives assistance to the Tennis Integrity Unit (TIU), which can include anti-corruption education for other players.

 

A TIU investigation secured evidence to confirm that between February 2012 and June 2015, he placed bets on 220 tennis matches through online accounts with Betclic and Pari Mutel Ubain.

 

The investigation was supported by information provided by the Autorité de Regulation des Jeux en Ligne (ARJEL), the French online gambling regulator.

 

None of the bets placed involved matches in which Mr Lestienne was playing.

 

The case was referred to and considered by independent Anti-Corruption Hearing Officer, Jane Mulcahy QC, who delivered the disciplinary Decision.

 

Mr Lestienne, 24, is currently ranked at a career-high 164 in singles.

 

Under the terms of the TACP all players and other Covered Persons are barred from betting on any tennis match. The offence falls under Section D.1.a – No Covered Person shall, directly or indirectly, wager or attempt to wager on the outcome or any other aspect of any Event or any other tennis competition.

 

The suspension applies with immediate effect and means the player is not allowed to compete in, or attend, any tournament or event organised or sanctioned by the governing bodies of the sport.

 

The Tennis Integrity Unit is an initiative of the Grand Slam Board, the International Tennis Federation, the ATP and the WTA, who are jointly committed to a zero tolerance approach to corruption in tennis. 

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ITF Launches Next Phase of its International Team Competitions Strategy

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PRESS RELEASE

21 September 2016

 

International Tennis Federation launches the next phase of its international team competitions strategy

 

The International Tennis Federation (ITF) today announced the next phase of its international team competitions strategy. With an emphasis on format changes to Davis Cup and Fed Cup by BNP Paribas at all levels of the competitions, this next phase will also look at innovative new ways to host both finals.

 

The next phase will include:

 

  • The launch of an open bid process to assess fixed host cities for the Davis Cup and Fed Cup by BNP Paribas Finals – a model used by events including the UEFA Champions League Final, Superbowl and European Rugby Champions Cup;

 

  • Further steps towards the introduction of a 16-team World Group for Fed Cup by BNP Paribas via the introduction of a Final Four event;

 

  • A full industry consultation on scheduling alternatives for the 2020 season;

 

  • A review of current match formats used in Davis Cup by BNP Paribas, particularly the current best-of- five-sets approach and scheduling requirements during the week;

 

  • An extensive feasibility study, by the newly created Davis & Fed Cup Taskforce, of format changes below World Group to better support and encourage involvement in both Davis and Fed Cup – particularly by developing tennis nations, and to further increase worldwide interest and viewership;

 

  • A full assessment of current staging options for host venues and cities;

 

  • A review of Junior Davis Cup and Fed Cup including the potential benefits of introducing new age group events;

 

All recommendations will be put to the ITF AGM in August 2017 with all changes requiring a formal vote of approval.

 

The bidding process for National Associations and cities interested in hosting the Finals will begin in December 2016 with the decision on successful bids anticipated to be made in the summer of 2017.

 

 

Davis Cup and Fed Cup by BNP Paribas have enjoyed significant fan growth over the past two years. Fan attendance has risen to 700,000 spectators annually, with the 2014 Davis Cup Final in Lille attracting the largest ever attendance for a recognised tennis match of 27,448 spectators. Broadcast of both events has now reached 3.6 billion households across 156 territories and the ITF has grown its combined social media audience to 1 million worldwide.

 

The draw for the 2017 Davis Cup by BNP Paribas will be made in London on Thursday 22 September. The final of the 2016 Fed Cup by BNP Paribas will be held on 12-13 November at Rhenus Sport stadium in Strasbourg. The final of the 2016 Davis Cup by BNP Paribas will be held on 25-27 November with the venue to be announced shortly.

 

Davis Cup by BNP Paribas is the World Cup of Tennis. It is the largest annual international team competition in sport, with 135 teams entered in 2016. The competition is 116 years old having been founded in 1900. The title sponsor is BNP Paribas, the Official Bank of Davis Cup. International sponsors are Rolex (Official Timekeeper), Adecco (Official HR Sponsor) and Betway (Official Betting Sponsor). beIN SPORTS is the Official Global Media Rights Partner. Follow all the action on www.daviscup.com, www.copadavis.com, www.twitter.com/daviscup, www.facebook.com/DavisCupTennis, www.Weibo.com/daviscupofficial and www.DavisCup.tv

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Seeds Announced for Draw for 2017 Davis Cup

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Seeds announced for Draw for 2017 Davis Cup by BNP Paribas

 

(September 19, 2016) Argentina and Croatia head the seeds for the Draw for the World Group of the 2017 Davis Cup by BNP Paribas, which will take place at the BNP Paribas offices in London on Thursday 22 September at 13:00 local time (12:00 GMT). The Draw will be streamed live on www.daviscup.com

 

The draws for 2017 Asia/Oceania Zone Groups I and II, and Europe/Africa Zone Groups I and II will also take place on Thursday. The ITF will confirm on Tuesday whether the draws can be held for Americas Zone Groups I and II.

 

According to the Davis Cup Regulations, the two finalist nations are seeded No. 1 and No. 2 in the World Group for the following year, and will be drawn in opposite halves. Seeds 3-8 are in accordance with the latest ITF Davis Cup Nations Ranking of 19 September.

 

World Group

 

  1. Argentina
  2. Croatia
  3. Great Britain
  4. Czech Republic
  5. Switzerland
  6. France
  7. Belgium
  8. Serbia

 

The seeded nations will be drawn against the remaining World Group nations: Australia, Canada, Germany, Italy, Japan, Russia, Spain and USA.

 

Seeds for the Zone Group I and Group II competitions are also based on the latest Davis Cup Nations Ranking.

 

Asia/Oceania Zone Group I

 

  1. Kazakhstan
  2. India

 

Remaining Nations: China P.R., Chinese Taipei, Korea Rep., New Zealand and Uzbekistan

 

Asia/Oceania Zone Group II

 

  1. Pakistan
  2. Thailand
  3. Philippines
  4. Vietnam

 

Remaining Nations: Hong Kong China, Indonesia, Iran and Kuwait

 

Europe/Africa Zone Group I

  1. Slovakia
  2. Ukraine
  3. Netherlands
  4. Austria

 

Remaining Nations: Belarus, Bosnia/Herzegovina, Hungary, Winner of Israel v Sweden, Poland, Portugal, Romania

 

Europe/Africa Zone Group II

 

  1. Loser of Israel v Sweden
  2. Slovenia
  3. Lithuania
  4. Denmark
  5. Finland
  6. Latvia
  7. Turkey
  8. South Africa

 

Remaining Nations: Cyprus, Estonia, Georgia, Madagascar, Monaco, Morocco, Norway and Tunisia

 

The World Group dates for the 2017 Davis Cup by BNP Paribas are as follows:

 

World Group first round: 3-5 February

World Group quarterfinals: 7-9 April

World Group semifinals and play-offs: 15-17 September

World Group Final: 24-26 November

 

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Davis Cup Results

DAVIS CUP - The World Cup of Tennis

17 September 2016

croatia edges closer to the final with doubles triumph
Marin Cilic and Ivan Dodig engineered a thrilling win over Nicolas Mahut and Pierre-Hugues Herbert to give Croatia a 2-1 lead over France in their Davis Cup by BNP Paribas semifinal on Saturday.

With Cilic starting as a strong favourite against Richard Gasquet in Sunday’s opening reverse singles, the outcome of the absorbing doubles contest put the competition’s 2005 winners in a commanding position to reach their second final.

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murray brothers keep comeback hopes alive
Andy and Jamie Murray have given Great Britain hope that a comeback is on as the brothers claimed victory in the doubles to reduce Argentina’s lead to 2-1 in the Davis Cup by BNP Paribas semifinals.

Around 19 hours after losing the longest match of his career, Andy returned to the Emirates Arena court, teaming up with his older brother to beat Juan Martin del Potro and Leonardo Mayer 61 36 64 64 in two hours and 55 minutes.

Read more

MORE NEWS DRAWS STATISTICS WATCH LIVE LIVE SCORES

DAVIS CUP - WORLD GROUP RESULTS
CLICK HERE FOR DETAILED RESULTS
VISIT TODAY'S GALLERY HERE

SHOW YOUR COLOURS #DAVISCUP PHOTO OF THE DAY!

Davis Cup by BNP Paribas is the World Cup of Tennis. It is the largest annual international team competition in sport, with 135 teams entered in 2016. The competition is 116 years old having been founded in 1900.

Twitter Facebook Instagram YouTube www.daviscup.com Twitter Facebook YouTube www.copadavis.com

FOR FURTHER PRESS INQUIRIES: ITF COMMUNICATIONS / Tel: -44(0)20 8392 4632 / Email: communications@itftennis.com

 

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Tennis Channel to Offer Live Coverage of Davis Cup Semifinals This Weekend

TennisChannelLogo 300 by 500

Andy Murray and Britain Host Argentina and Juan Martin del Potro
in Olympic Gold Medal Rematch

LOS ANGELES, Sept. 15, 2016 -Tennis Channel and Tennis Channel Plus will provide complete live coverage from both Davis Cup semifinals this weekend, including the battle between reigning Davis Cup champion Britain and Argentina in Glasgow, Scotland. Three-time major winner and World No. 2 Andy Murray of Britain will face former US Open champion Juan Martin del Potro for the first time since defeating the Argentinian to win his second consecutive men’s singles gold medal at the Olympic Games in Brazil last month.

In addition to televising the Britain-Argentina Davis Cup match-up, Tennis Channel will offer live looks at the Croatia-France competition in Zadar, Croatia, this weekend. World-whiparound coverage will get underway at 8 a.m. ET, Friday, Sept. 16; 9 a.m. ET, Saturday, Sept. 17; and 8 a.m. ET, Sunday, Sept. 18. Among the stars set to play this weekend are France’s Richard Gasquet and Croatia’s Marin Cilic.

Tennis Channel’s Los Angeles studio will be the central hub for all Davis Cup action this weekend. Emmy Award-winning sportscaster Brett Haber  will call the action, alongside former U.S. Davis Cup players Justin Gimelstob and Paul Annacone  Gimelstob won two major mixed-doubles titles during his career and Annacone is renowned for having coached both Pete Sampras and Roger Federer, two names in the “greatest of all time” conversation.

Viewers can also catch all matches in their entirety on the network’s digital subscription service, Tennis Channel Plus.

Tennis Channel’s live Davis Cup coverage is as follows (all time ET):
Friday, Sept. 16:
8a.m. -Singles Britain v. Argentina / Croatia v. France

Saturday, Sept. 17:
9a.m. -Doubles Britain v. Argentina / Croatia v. France

Sunday, Sept. 18:
8a.m. -Singles Britain v. Argentina / Croatia v. France

Argentina holds a 3-1 advantage over Britain in Davis Cup competition, most recently winning in the 2008 first-round competition in Argentina. Britain’s sole victory over Argentina came in England in 1928, and it enters this weekend’s match after defeating Serbia 3-2 in the quarterfinals in July. Last year, Britain defeated Belgium in the Davis Cup final to win its 10th title. Captain Leon Smith will lead Murray, Daniel Evans, Kyle Edmund and Jamie Murray into the semifinals.

The Argentine team enters this weekend after defeating Italy 3-1 in July to reach its 11th semifinal in the last 15 years. Argentina has finished runner-up on four occasions: in 1981, 2006, 2008 and 2011.The team is captained by Daniel Orsanic and features del Potro, Federico Delbonis, Guido Pella and Leonard Mayer.

France and Croatia have only faced each other once in Davis Cup play, with France winning the meeting in Metz, France, in 2004.The team enters this weekend’s matchup after securing its first win on Czech Republic soil since 1926. France is bidding to win its 10th Davis Cup title.

Croatia comes into the competition after a 3-2 quarterfinal victory over the United States. The nation clinched its first Davis Cup trophy in 2005, when it defeated Slovakia 3-2.

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Davis Cup Draws – 15 September 2016

DAVIS CUP - The World Cup of Tennis

15 September 2016

MURRAY to face del potro in blockbuster opener
Davis Cup by BNP Paribas fans in Glasgow will be treated to a repeat of the Olympic final on Friday, with world No. 2 Andy Murray taking on Juan Martin del Potro in semifinal action.

Almost five weeks after their thrilling encounter in the final at the Rio Olympics, Murray and Del Potro will lock horns once again in a blockbuster start to the Davis Cup by BNP Paribas semifinal between Great Britain and Argentina.

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injury-hit france to take on buoyant croatia in zadar
Croatia’s Borna Coric will take on France’s Richard Gasquet in the opening rubber of the Davis Cup by BNP Paribas World Group semifinal at the Kresimir Cosic Hall in Zadar.

Former Davis Cup by BNP Paribas champions France will have a mountain to climb in their mouth-watering semifinal tie against hosts Croatia, who will be roared on by a passionate crowd in Zadar’s Kresimir Cosic arena.

Read more

MORE NEWS DRAWS STATISTICS WATCH LIVE LIVE SCORES

DAVIS CUP - WORLD GROUP RESULTS
CLICK HERE FOR DETAILED RESULTS
VISIT TODAY'S GALLERY HERE

SHOW YOUR COLOURS #DAVISCUP PHOTO OF THE DAY!

Davis Cup by BNP Paribas is the World Cup of Tennis. It is the largest annual international team competition in sport, with 135 teams entered in 2016. The competition is 116 years old having been founded in 1900.

Twitter Facebook Instagram YouTube www.daviscup.com Twitter Facebook YouTube www.copadavis.com

FOR FURTHER PRESS INQUIRIES: ITF COMMUNICATIONS / Tel: -44(0)20 8392 4632 / Email: communications@itftennis.com

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In Their Own Words – Stan Wawrinka and Novak Djokovic

Stan Wawrinka

Stan Wawrinka

 

(September 11, 2016) FLUSHING MEADOWS, NY – Posting player interviews from day 14 of the US Open.

Note from the US Open Media Operations Guide as why Tennis Panorama News is allowed to post transcripts:

Transcripts of player interviews cannot be posted until one (1) hour after the interview has ended. Player transcripts can only be posted on the website of the publication that was accredited.

Stan Wawrinka

Press Conference

S. WAWRINKA/N. Djokovic

6-7, 6-4, 7-5, 6-3

THE MODERATOR: Questions, please.

Q. You look like a happy man.
STAN WAWRINKA: Yeah, hopefully I’m happy after a win like that. Thank you.

Q. Congratulations. What does this victory mean, especially against an opponent like Novak who you attributed your success to?
STAN WAWRINKA: Yeah, this is amazing, for sure, amazing two weeks. I spend so much time on the court. Today I knew it will be a really tough battle again playing the No. 1 player, Novak Djokovic, who always push you to play your best tennis if you want to beat him.

That’s why I start to do, and I try to do. Was not only in the tennis side but physically and mentally was really tough, again. Honestly after the match I was completely empty. I put everything on the court. Not only today, but the past two weeks.

Today I was trying to stay with him. I was trying to be tough with myself. Trying not to show anything. Not to show any pain. Not to show any cramp. Not to show anything. I was suffering on the court, but I’m happy and proud with what I have achieved today.

Q. He called you the more courageous player. How much did courage come into play?
STAN WAWRINKA: Yeah, for sure. But there is no secret. If you want to beat the No. 1 player in the world, you have to give everything.

As I said the other day, you have to accept to suffer and you have almost to enjoy to suffer. Because I think this Grand Slam was the most painful, physically and mentally, Grand Slam that I ever played.

As I said, I was feeling tired already at the beginning of the match. I was feeling the cramp coming in the third set. In the fourth set I had some pain, but most important was what was clear with Magnus before was not to show anything. Not to show anything. Give everything and keep fighting and go try to win it.

Q. Every player has dreamed of winning a Grand Slam, but I think your dream is going a little bit further down. Maybe a career Grand Slam. Is it a coincidence in the last two years to collect these three Grand Slams or there is any, can I say a systemic plan with Magnus, focus on Grand Slam?
STAN WAWRINKA: So what? Are you saying next year I focus only on Wimbledon? (Smiling.) There is no plan. The only plan is trying to push myself the maximum to be the best player I can. I’m not good enough to start and say, Okay, I’m going to win a Grand Slam this year. No.

I’m trying every day, day by day, practicing hard, trying every match to win. And, again, I think the result will come because I’m doing that every day, because I’m fighting with myself to improve, to be a better tennis player, because I have a great team behind me pushing me every day to try to be a better tennis player.

I think this year I’m playing way better than last year. As you said, at the beginning, for me, I never dreamed to win a Grand Slam until I won the Australian Open. It was never a dream because for me it was way too far.

And, again here, I arrive here without putting goal to win it. Arrive here, take match after match. Every time I step on the court I know I can beat my opponent. Even today.

But when I start the tournament, I’m not seeing the draw and say, Okay, my goal is to win the tournament.

Q. You have had so much success now against No. 1 players in these finals at Grand Slams. What is it you’re able to do here and why hasn’t it so far translated — obviously these are the biggest matches, biggest wins. What is it that needs to happen to transcend to other matches?
STAN WAWRINKA: Well, I think I take confidence every time I win a match. In Grand Slam you play every two days five-set match. You have a little bit more time to make mistake. That’s what happen with me. I always try to be at my top in every Grand Slam.

As you can see, I don’t play my best tennis in the first round, but I’m trying to find a way to improve each match. Every match I won in a Grand Slam I take confidence of that, and when I arrive in the final I know that my game is there.

Today, before the final, I was really nervous like never before. I was shaking in the locker. When we start five minutes before the match talking, last few things with Magnus, I start to cry. I was completely shaking.

But the only thing I was convinced with myself that my game was there. Physically I was there. My game was there. Put the fight on the court and you will have a chance to win.

And that’s what happen after few games when I start to believe in myself, start to be in the match. I was only focus on the match, not what can happen if I win the match. Is it the final of the U.S.? No, I’m just focused what I’m doing in the court.

Q. You described the physical pain you endured and how you did not want to show it. What was going through your mind when your opponent called for an injury timeout in the fourth set?
STAN WAWRINKA: Yeah, I saw he was struggling. I saw he was struggling physically. I knew also before the match that when I play against him I have to push the limit. When he took the timeout for injury I was just trying to stay calm, trying to stay warm. I didn’t want to get cold because I was also struggling a lot physically. I was cramping few times.

So I just wanted to make sure my body will be ready when we start again. Because sometimes we’re sweating. If you stop for five or seven minutes, then your body can react differently.

So I was really focused on my body.

Q. But what about the fairness of the timeout and the timing of the timeout? What were your thoughts about that?
STAN WAWRINKA: For me, I just ask the umpire because he asked the physio when he was serving and we played maybe seven more points and everything. I just wanted to know exactly what was the rule.

That’s it. If your opponent is struggling, if he has blood coming out, you have to stop. So when the umpire and the referee came to me saying, It’s like that. It’s just happening. We have to stop for him because there is blood coming out. We have to make sure he’s going to be okay.

For me I was fine. It was just have to focus on my body and make sure that I was going to be ready for the first point we play after that.

Q. Maybe you don’t remember eight years ago you were down two sets to love to somebody called Cipolla.
STAN WAWRINKA: I do remember. He never shake my hand. He’s Italian. He never shake my hand. I do remember on Court 11 or 14. Yeah, of course I remember. (Smiling.)

Q. Okay. I remember too. (Laughter.)
STAN WAWRINKA: Good.

Q. What were your goals at that time? What were you thinking that you could have become as a player? Were you thinking, Well, I’d be top 10, top 20 or whatever? That was one question. And the second one is very brief. Won three slams and only one Masters 1000. How?
STAN WAWRINKA: I don’t care. I’m happy. But I agree. I agree.

First question, my career was always the same. Always been step by step. First I wanted to be a professional tennis player. That’s mean living with your passion, with your sport. Then was to be top 100, then top 50. It’s always been like that.

That’s always how I deal with my goal. I never start anything I want to be No. 1. I want to win Grand Slam. For me, no. It’s always step by step. The only thing I want to do it’s to push the limit. That’s mean when I stop playing tennis I have no regrets. I cannot come back and say, Why you didn’t practice more? Why you didn’t did that or that?

No. I just want to push myself to the limit and see where I can go.

For the other question, there is no answer. I cannot tell you why do I have three Grand Slam and only one Masters 1000. I can only say I’m happy with that trophy tonight.

Q. Tomorrow in a few hours the people will wake up in Switzerland, home country, and they will be very proud and say, Stan is our man and very convinced about this. What I want to ask you, you’re very often struggling against players ranked 64 in this tournament. For example, Evans. Then when the tournament continues and you face the really tough opponent like Nishikori and of course today, Novak you getting better and better. So you have won out of the three Grand Slams two against Novak. What’s the secret that you can beat obviously the No. 1 player in the world easier than a player ranked No. so-and-so?
STAN WAWRINKA: Ah, as I say, before the tournament I tried to do everything to be ready. Before we started the tournament I was feeling good physically, mentally. My tennis was there. I was playing one of my best practice weeks so I was confident with myself.

But then when you start the tournament, you know you’re not gonna play your best tennis. You know you’re not gonna play your best game at the beginning. Also, you have to see that playing on Armstrong, on center, and now it’s completely different.

The day I play, the three match I play there was quite windy. I was struggling with my game. I was hesitating.

In general, the only pressure that I feel in a Grand Slam is the pressure I put on myself. When I play player like Evans, for example, I put too much pressure on myself. I don’t want to lose. I want to win. I want to keep advancing in the tournament.

So I’m not relaxed enough to play my best tennis, and that day was playing really well. I think you need to also understand that there is no easy match. Doesn’t matter the ranking. Evans was playing really well. He was making me play not my best game. I had to fight. I had to stay positive. I had to find solution. I did. I save match point.

For sure you get a little bit lucky when you save match point, but that’s tennis. The more I win in a Grand Slam, the better I feel. As I said yesterday, I practiced. I was feeling the ball. I could close my eyes. I was feeling the best tennis I ever played.

So I was sure that in the final I would be ready for that.

Q. You remember the last year Novak Djokovic beat Roger Federer in the final of this tournament. How did you face him today? Any chance to chat Roger about how to, you know —
STAN WAWRINKA: To lose?

Q. — to face Novak today?
STAN WAWRINKA: (Smiling.) No, I didn’t have a chance to chat with Roger. I think Roger is one of my closest friends on the tour. It’s not the first time I play Novak. It’s not the first time that I play Novak in the big final or important match.

In the past we talked many times with Roger. He ask me advice. I ask him advice. But, no, I didn’t ask him anything. I think I know exactly what I have to do when I play Novak, especially in final of Grand Slam. I need to be ready. I need to be focused and go for it.

Q. In your career we have seen a lot of determination, a lot of perseverance, and we saw a lot of that tonight. You hung in there and came back after losing the first set. Talk about perseverance and determination. Is that an important part of your game and was it important tonight?
STAN WAWRINKA: Yeah, it’s important in my career in general. For sure tonight was important, but if you look, I have to be always like that. That’s why I saved match point against Evans. I wasn’t playing my best tennis, but I keep trying, keep fighting. Do the right thing.

If I go on court and I do the right thing, the things that I think can help me to win and I lose, then I say congrats to my opponent. I push myself.

Tonight, for sure, when you play Novak he’s a beast mentally. He’s gonna stay there. He’s gonna push you. Normally he always find solution. He’s No. 1 player. He won so many title, so many trophy, and it’s always the biggest challenge to play against him.

Q. Congratulations, Stan. I want to ask you, after your match against Evans on Armstrong, underneath there was a great moment when you were walking off and applauded by the ball boys and girls. I want to ask you what that sort of love and affection you get from the people and the fans, how that impacts you?
STAN WAWRINKA: I love it. I love the fans, but especially also the person working the tournament every day. Every day you arrive you see them. I love the ball kids. They always there. It was great to see them being happy for me after the match on the Armstrong against Evans.

If I can sign or give picture or anything, I’m always happy. I think all the person, I see them every day. Every day I come here. Every day I’m leaving. They always take care of me, my team, of everybody.

So I really enjoy spend time with them.

Q. You had mentioned Roger just before. Have you heard from him at all across the tournament or even…
STAN WAWRINKA: Yeah, a few message, yeah. Congrats, good luck. Things like that. Yeah.

Q. Was it encouraging…
STAN WAWRINKA: What I just said. (Laughter.) Few message.

Q. You mentioned before that you wouldn’t focus on trying to win Wimbledon. What do you think your chances are of winning there eventually?
STAN WAWRINKA: It’s too far. Too far to think about Wimbledon. I think I can play my best tennis on grass also, but so far I didn’t pass the quarterfinals. There is way better tennis player than me on grass.

I’m trying. I’m trying every year to improve. I’m trying every year to find solution. This year I had someone in my team to help me to understand a little bit better the game, but I didn’t play my best tennis yet there. Hopefully it will come.

Q. You mentioned earlier being so nervous tonight that you shook and cried in the locker room. Is this the most nervous you have ever been before a match? If so, why more tonight than, say, the French or Australian?
STAN WAWRINKA: I think the most close to that was the French Open final. I was also — because I don’t want to lose the final in a Grand Slam. That simple. That’s the only reason.

The pressure, I was feeling amazing after the semifinal. I was feeling great yesterday. Really happy. But this morning it start to be there, the feeling of you don’t want to lose. I don’t want to come to the court and lose a final. So close, so far.

So maybe it’s the reason why I was feeling so nervous.

Q. What did you do to quell your nerves?
STAN WAWRINKA: I had to put my shit together. (Smiling.) Sorry. That’s how I say it.

Q. You have always declined to say that you felt you were one of the Big 4.
STAN WAWRINKA: But I’m not.

Q. In his press conference, Novak was asked about whether it should now be a big 5 and he said you deserve consideration. What is your feeling on that? Are you saying you’re not?
STAN WAWRINKA: Okay, let’s — Novak is always so nice with me. I love him. He’s a good friend. He always say a lot of nice thing about me.

The Big 4, I’m really far from them. Just look the tournament they won, how many years they been there. If you look, yes, I have three Grand Slams. How many Masters 1000 have Murray? They have been there since ten years.

They have not only been winning, but being in semifinal, final every time. That’s why I’m not there. I don’t want to be there. For me, there is no question about that. But I’m trying the best I can with my career.

I’m really, really happy with what I’m doing so far. I’m proud of myself by winning three Grand Slam. This is something I never expect and dream about it, but I have them and I’m happy to take the trophy back home.

Q. Is the No. 1 ranking a goal for you at all?
STAN WAWRINKA: No.

Q. What do you think you have to do to achieve it?
STAN WAWRINKA: That question come every time I won a Grand Slam. But my best ranking was No. 3 in the world. It’s simple. I’m way too far to even think about being No. 1. Look at Novak is No. 1. He’s winning two or three Grand Slam a year. He’s winning five Masters 1000 minimum. He’s winning everything or being in the final.

I’m winning four tournaments a year. I’m happy with that. I’m really happy with that. Four tournaments, one Grand Slam. It’s amazing. It’s huge. It’s big. But I’m way too far to be No. 1.

Q. You were saying that the only pressure what you put yourself. Do you think that pressure is gonna diminish or decrease? You like be expected to do better every time?
STAN WAWRINKA: I think my first Grand Slam final I was winning really well. I was not feeling nervous; I was feeling good. I was basically already happy with the final. I came on the court to win it, but I knew it will be okay to lose it, also.

But then… Then… Then I’m not that young anymore. Then you start. You’re in another final of a Grand Slam. You don’t want to lose it. You don’t want to lose the opportunity to win that trophy there, especially a Grand Slam.

So I think for sure the pressure in general during the year go down, but when I play final the pressure go up. Because the trophy of winner finalist is not the same.

 

 

Novak Djokovic

Novak Djokovic

 

Novak Djokovic

Press Conference

S. WAWRINKA/N. Djokovic

6-7, 6-4, 7-5, 6-3

THE MODERATOR: Questions, please.

Q. Does this match mean that tennis officially now has a big 5?
NOVAK DJOKOVIC: Well, I mean, he deserves to be in the mix, no doubt about it. Stan won three Grand Slams now and three different ones; Olympic medal. Been around for so many years, and he plays best in the big matches.

I mean, he definitely deserves to be mentioned in the mix of top players.

Q. You called him a big match player just now and said it the other day. You said today he was the more courageous player out there tonight. What did Stan bring to you?
NOVAK DJOKOVIC: Simple as that, you know. I just didn’t capitalize at all on my opportunities. I had plenty of them, break points. It was a terrible conversion of the break points. Just terrible from my side.

You know, in the matches like this, if you don’t use the opportunities, the other guy comes and takes it. And that’s what he did. That’s why I said he was more courageous, because he stepped in and played aggressive where I was kind of more waiting for things to happen.

And that’s it.

Q. You sometimes had matches where you’re the one saving lots of break points, including the final here last year. Do you remember a match like this for you before where you weren’t able to capitalize?
NOVAK DJOKOVIC: To be honest, I don’t know. I’m not sure. You know, obviously Grand Slam finals are different than any other match. I have lost a few Grand Slam finals, some close matches.

You know, this has been one of the worst stat on the break point conversion for me, that’s for sure.

Q. What exactly was your fourth-set injury? What effect was it having on you?
NOVAK DJOKOVIC: Just the toenails were off and bleeding. Yeah, it was quite painful to move around.

You know, I tried.

Q. The past few years we have been used to you being focused and keeping your cool under pressure. After the first set it seemed like there was a lot of anger towards your box. Can you explain?
NOVAK DJOKOVIC: Yeah, you know, I lost my nerves in the important moments. He kept his cool. I think that’s what decided the match.

I guess sometimes it happens, even though you have the experience and know what to do. Just the heat of the moment and importance of the match, I guess, you know, was too strong for me at certain periods of the match. Just if you lose your cool, the match can go away.

Q. You mentioned on court that you considered not playing in the Open I guess after Rio. How seriously did you consider that, and was the toe injury something that bothered you at all before today? Was that more the wrist?
NOVAK DJOKOVIC: No, no, it wasn’t the toe. The toe just happened today. Some other injury that was, you know, very serious at the time. I really didn’t know whether or not I’m going to come, to be honest. Decided like eight, nine days before the start of the Open just to try.

To play finals, it’s quite amazing.

Q. You lost two Grand Slam finals now against Stan. What makes it so difficult for you especially to beat him in strong moments like Grand Slam title?
NOVAK DJOKOVIC: Well, he just steps in. He loves to play in the big matches. He comes up with his best game. He’s so solid from both corners. He’s got a good slice and amazing one-handed backhand, all corners. Big serve. Moves well.

He’s a very complete player. Sometimes if he feels right he doesn’t miss much and makes a lot of winners and it’s hard to play him. That’s what happened today.

Q. Was there any cramping going on in the last set from you or just the toe?
NOVAK DJOKOVIC: No.

Q. And what was the effect of the toe having on your game?
NOVAK DJOKOVIC: I don’t think it’s necessary for me to talk about that now, you know. He won the match. He deserved to win this trophy, and that’s it.

I don’t want to talk about this and you guys think I’m finding excuses. It’s just not necessary.

Q. Can you talk about the weight of his shot? Seems like he hits just a really heavy ball, heavier than others, compared to, say, a Rafa and Roger and Andy.
NOVAK DJOKOVIC: Yeah, he hits a very heavy ball, especially from the backhand corner. Forehand is very flat. You know, he goes for his shots from the forehand side. Backhand, you know, great chip, great slice. He uses that when he’s defending and then he comes up, you know, and can get you off the court with a backhand crosscourt.

That’s probably one of his best shots in the game. Physically he’s very strong, so he can endure a lot.

Q. Were you surprised that you were allowed to take a timeout before Stan’s serve? Do you think that was fair?
NOVAK DJOKOVIC: I was allowed, so I took it.

Q. Were you surprised that you…
NOVAK DJOKOVIC: Why would I be surprised if I was allowed?

Q. Because the rules say it should be a key medical condition.
NOVAK DJOKOVIC: It was.

Q. Of course in a match that lasted for almost four hours there are many moments which could be decisive. Do you think there is one more than the others or some more than the others? I remember, for instance, when you were up — when Wawrinka was 2-1 in the second set, long time ago, you made two double faults. I don’t know if you were nervous, but two doubles in the same set is not usual for you.
NOVAK DJOKOVIC: I made a lot of double faults throughout this tournament. I was struggling with that shot and with, you know, with the motion, with the movement and on the serve, with the technique because of what I carried into this tournament.

So, you know, I was working a lot on it and trying to find that rhythm, but my body has kind of compensated and, you know, made some different things to protect the problem I had with the arm.

You know, unfortunately it wasn’t — the serve wasn’t there. When it was needed it wasn’t there, and in the big matches like this you need the serve. I lost decisive games in second and third set. Just handed him over with some unforced errors and bad serves.

But, you know, I guess I was trying to protect the serve, I guess, with other shots, but it wasn’t to be today.

Q. I guess your schedule means that you next play or are due to play in Asia. Are you concerned these injuries you have been worried about before the tournament and the injuries you suffered during the tournament, they have an impact on you maybe not playing there?
NOVAK DJOKOVIC: I sincerely doubt that this is going to prevent me from playing there. I think I’m going to be ready.

Q. Obviously just stepped off the court after a tough loss, but it is the end of the Grand Slam year; there are still major tournaments. You had that great triumph in Paris. (Indiscernible) What’s your assessment?
NOVAK DJOKOVIC: Well, winning four Grand Slams in a row for me was an incredible achievement. I’m very proud of it, so this loss today cannot overshadow the great moments I have had in Australia and especially in Paris.

So winning two out of four Grand Slams is pretty good year, and playing another final. I have no complaints. Obviously I wish that I could win another title, but this is what it is. You have to shake hands and accept the loss from a better player and move on, you know.

It’s not the first time. It’s not the last time I’m going to lose a match, big match. Hopefully I can learn from it. Hopefully I can get better, because, you know, that’s the cycle of life, I guess, for us athletes.

Q. Not just tonight, but this whole tournament there has been a lot of debate about injury timeouts, toilet breaks, whatever. You’re obviously a big guy now on the player council. Do you think tennis needs to look again at the rules? Do you think the game needs to look at trying to clarify what’s allowed and what isn’t?
NOVAK DJOKOVIC: We’ll talk about it, sure. If players bring that up to the table, you know. You know, I didn’t have any I guess major complaints about that against me or me against any other player.

If there are — if this is a debate and players think there should be something changed in the rules, of course we are there to discuss. Will bring this up to the council soon I guess if this is a big deal.

Q. When you’re talking about your mindset coming into the tournament on court, another thing you added is if anyone would say you’d play finals you’d take it. Now you have played the finals and obviously disappointed in…
NOVAK DJOKOVIC: In this moment I don’t take it, but…(Smiling.)

Q. That’s my point.
NOVAK DJOKOVIC: Well, sure. Of course. Just coming off the court, it’s never easy to lose Grand Slam finals, big matches, playing four hours, of course.

Of course everybody wants to be victorious, but at the end of the day, sometimes you win, you lose, and you’ve got to accept it, gotta accept it and gotta let it go. From a larger perspective, why I said I’ll take it because it was really, you know, in doubt whether or not I’m going to come here and up to really last day.

So I came in here, you know, struggled first couple of days with practice and first match and so forth, and then to get the finals, I mean, it’s a big result. Of course I set up a high standard for myself with great results I have had in last couple of years. I’m really successful and I’m grateful for that.

But, you know, again, I have to try tomorrow to look from this different perspective and say, Wow, I played finals. I mean, that’s not too bad.

Q. You sound pleased to get to the final, but I’m just wondering if you feel like the lack of match play on the way through the tournament took its toll.
NOVAK DJOKOVIC: Not really. You know, I don’t feel like the lack of match play affected my performance today. I just felt all right. You know, I was hitting the ball well in quarters, fourth round, quarters, semis I was playing good. Today I started off well, but down the stretch he was the better player. As simple as that.

You know, sometimes in sport these things happen.

Q. Sorry to come to the question of medical timeouts, but I just wanted to clarify. You said if other players are concerned it’s something you would talk about on the player council. Can I clarify what your personal opinion is? Do you feel the present rules are okay?
NOVAK DJOKOVIC: Well, I’ve gotta check the rules even better, I guess, after you guys brought it up. Obviously there is a bit of a concern from, I don’t know, media or players. You know, there is speculations whether the rules are accurate or not.

So I’ve got to first check all the rules, because I don’t know every single rule to, you know, perfection. First I have to inform myself before I make any kind of statements.

For now, I know we out the inability for a player to ask for a medical timeout of he has cramps, for example. That was a big debate couple years ago. That’s effective right now.

Other than that, I didn’t hear too many complaints, to be honest. But again, maybe I just haven’t heard. Now I have to speak with other players and get myself informed and see what it takes.

Q. In light of your doubts about coming to the tournament, thank you for your dedication to this hard-working city and those around the world who respect such courage as well as entertainment. Why and how do you give so much of yourself in defeat as well as in victory in the sport of no substitutes or penalty serves after 235 minutes? Is it the way you grew up or have you evolved into such a champion in all outcomes?
NOVAK DJOKOVIC: Well, thank you for your nice words and compliments. I have to speak on my own behalf because obviously everybody is different. But the way I see things in life, you know, my kind of mindset and ideology I guess is that whether or not you win or lose, you know, in the end of the day you have to be very respectful towards the opponent, towards the sport, towards the occasion, to those people who come to see you.

Of course in the heat of the moment your emotions are here or there. You’re tense. You’re trying your best to win. Of course everybody is playing the sport because you want to make some kind of success in life. You know, what defines success now, that’s different for each one of us.

For me, success is not just winning tennis matches and winning trophies, you know. It’s more than that. I guess my main source of playing tennis, main source of motivation for playing the sport, is because I really like it. It’s my choice to do it.

But, you know, once you get to the top and you have that privilege, status, and position, then I guess the importance of what you say, how you behave, what you do, is much larger. Just not comparable to any other position in the rankings or so forth.

So I guess that kind of privilege, status, taught me a lot of lessons in life, and I got experience. I learned a lot about myself, about who I should be, who I should become, and it’s an everyday evolution for me and for everybody else.

That’s the way I take it.

Q. You have had moments on this court, including today and in some of the big semifinals against Roger, where you kind of call for the crowd to get behind you. Do you feel like that could have helped you in the fourth set? I mean, you were injured, but also had your chances to have break points against him. Did you want that support from the crowd?
NOVAK DJOKOVIC: I heard crowd chanting my name many times, so I’m very thankful. I don’t feel that that lacked on my side.

Of course Stan was getting support. I was getting support. The crowd was really enjoying the match and was really into it. I saw a full stadium for four hours. It was amazing. Amazing atmosphere.

Q. A key stat was the break point stat. Why do you think you had such troubles specifically on break points today?
NOVAK DJOKOVIC: Well, I was saying before, you know, I didn’t take my chances. I had many break points where I was in the rally, where I had a second shot, where I just missed some easy balls. That’s it.

Sometimes you get that kind of uncomfortable feeling and you’re not able to, you know, let everything flow as you want it. You know, you don’t have things working the way you want them. That’s it.

Q. Being a protagonist of this match, can you compare the quality of this match with the one in Paris? In Paris you were strong favorite before. This time a little bit probably less because of your condition, situation, and so on. At the end, what do you think you played better? What do you think he played better?
NOVAK DJOKOVIC: Similar matches. You know, I started well and won the first set in both finals, and then, you know, close second set.

Then he managed to kind of make this breakthrough, you know, in the second and third. Then just both matches I think in the fourth set he was just playing his best where he was just swinging from every shot and every corner, going through the ball and being aggressive, taking his chances.

That’s how I can, I guess, explain and maybe compare the same.

Q. Quality?
NOVAK DJOKOVIC: Quality, I mean, quality was there I think from both of us. We both tried. When you have top two players — I mean, two top players playing against each other in a Grand Slam final, you expect good quality, of course. We played four hours here and Roland Garros was almost the same, so I thought the tennis was good.

Q. Given the high standard you set for yourself and the great start that you had for this year, how are you going to look back on this summer from a physical and a psychological standpoint?
NOVAK DJOKOVIC: Well, there is a lot to learn. You know, life is a big lesson. It’s a big book. You know, we keep writing the stories. There is another story to be written.

Of course, the end of this story for US Open. I wish that it was a bit different, but again, I think — and I will mention it again: we learn much more from the losses like this than from wins. Because when you’re winning, everything is fine and you maybe, I guess, shadow certain things that are relevant for you to face and to tackle and to work on.

But when you lose, then all of a sudden, you know, you just start questioning yourself whether, you know, you have done things right or not and what can you do to be better as a person, as a player.

So that’s where I’m at right now, and that’s what I will think about for the rest of this season and next year.

 

 

Felix Auger Aliassime

Press Conference

F. AUGER-ALIASSIME/M. Kecmanovic

6-3, 6-0

THE MODERATOR: Questions, please.

Q. You’re out there, have two of the best players in the game right now playing on the stadium. Kind of a short dropshot away from you. Emotions there with you with them? What’s it feel like here and what’s going on there and you’re finishing up your match?
FELIX AUGER-ALIASSIME: Yeah, it was kind of funny. It was not the same atmosphere as yesterday, I would say. Yesterday was pretty packed up and it was good atmosphere on the court.

Today was a bit dead because at the same time they had the men’s final. I really had to push myself. You know, sometimes you’ve got to play by yourself. I look around and find solutions outside. It can help, but I really try to focus and win my match, yeah.

Q. After what happened in Paris, how satisfying is this for you to win this?
FELIX AUGER-ALIASSIME: Yeah, it’s obviously really great. Yeah, obviously I’m not gonna lie. I had some nightmares about this heartbreaking final. You don’t really want it to happen again.

So I was really focused on going into this match. I really wanted that win. Yeah, it’s obviously a great feeling. Yeah.

Q. Your opponent said you just played too good. How do you rank your performance today in all the performances you’ve had in your career?
FELIX AUGER-ALIASSIME: Yeah, I think it was one of the best performance I have had. And also in the final you never know what can happen. You know, you don’t always play your best level because you’re a bit nervous and there is something big to go get.

But, yeah, I just stayed really steady. My serve, first-serve percentage, was really high today. I had a few aces, so of course it helps.

And in the second set I think I was really going through him and putting a lot of pressure on him, yeah.

Q. I think you were serving at 4-2 in the first set and you were down 15-40, I think. I think that might have been the only break points that he had.
FELIX AUGER-ALIASSIME: Yeah.

Q. How important do you think it was for your confidence and for maybe his, you know, for you to get back in that there?
FELIX AUGER-ALIASSIME: Yeah, I think there was a pretty good, pretty big game to go get. After, you never know what’s gonna happen. Maybe he gets back in the match and he gets more pumped.

Anyway, I would have been on the — on the next game would have been mentally prepared, so I didn’t put too much importance on that game. Because you didn’t want to get nervous at 4-2 in the first set because you’re down a break point.

Yeah, it was great to fight and get that game.

Q. And it was your serve that kind of bailed you out of that, would you say?
FELIX AUGER-ALIASSIME: Yeah. I had two good first serves, if I remember well.

Yeah, of course the serve was there today. I didn’t really hesitate. I didn’t look at the score that was down. I just went for my shots, and that’s what I do best, yeah.

Q. In theory, you’ve got another two years of junior career ahead of you.
FELIX AUGER-ALIASSIME: Yeah.

Q. Is this win gonna change anything in your future plans?
FELIX AUGER-ALIASSIME: Yeah, it might. It might, because I have already had some good wins at the pro level. I know I can compete with these guys.

And now being able to win a slam, make a final on two different surface, I think it might be time to go to the next level. But you never know what’s gonna happen next year. If I want to go back and play the junior Grand Slams, I will. Yeah, we’ll see how it goes, yeah.

Q. How exciting a time is it for Canadian tennis? Obviously Denis had a good win a couple months ago, and now you. What’s the general fight like at the moment?
FELIX AUGER-ALIASSIME: Yeah, it’s pretty cool for the Canadian tennis. I’m happy for all of us. I’m happy for the people that work with us. They have put in so much work.

Obviously I was very proud of Denis’ win. I’m sure he probably texted me already to congratulate me because he’s one of my good friends.

But, yeah, it’s great to see us having success like this. I hope we can reach the highest stage.

Q. When you’re looking at turning pro, how much do you follow what other guys, other teenagers, have been able to do at the next level? Casper Ruud just won a challenger today. Do those sort of things influence you or you think differently about yourself, or is it all just about you?
FELIX AUGER-ALIASSIME: I mean, I think everyone has his own path. Some guys, they win early in juniors but it doesn’t go as well in the pros.

A guy like Taylor won the US Open last year and was top 100 the year after. No, everyone is kind of different. We’ll see how my body feels after this year. We’ll make the adjustments that we need to do, yeah.

Q. Is being No. 1 junior, does that have any significance for you?
FELIX AUGER-ALIASSIME: Not so much, I would say, honestly. I think the junior level is really great to play the Grand Slams. You know, you kind of get the feeling of the environment and you see the big guys next to you and you have the chance to see these unbelievable tournaments.

But after all, it’s really in the pro circuit that that is really important. Obviously I would want to be No. 1 in the world. It would be a big bonus, but that’s not what we are aiming for here.

Q. After the French Open you said you had to go back to school. Is that the same thing now?
FELIX AUGER-ALIASSIME: Yeah, same thing. Not quite, because I’m leaving for junior Davis Cup in a few days in Hungary. Yeah, obviously school’s gotta keep going. Yeah.

Q. Can you explain to us what you have experienced during the week leading up till today, till your win?
FELIX AUGER-ALIASSIME: Yeah, it wasn’t an easy week. I have had some tough matches in the first rounds. It’s never easy to come to a Grand Slam. You know, you’ve reach a final before, but every opponents are still going to be tough. You still have to go win and win every match. There is no free rounds.

Yeah, it was tough. Also with the heat and my health it was kind of difficult at some points, but that’s where you have to mentally stay calm, stay on your feet, and just take it one day at a time. Yeah.

Q. Can you tell us how tall you are?
FELIX AUGER-ALIASSIME: 1 meter 88, so 6’2″, 6’2.5″. Not 6’3″ yet.

Q. Have you been growing lately?
FELIX AUGER-ALIASSIME: I haven’t looked at it so much, but yeah, obviously I have been growing. Yeah, I feel it in my game, I feel it in everything.

But, yeah, I have been growth a few inches in the last year, yeah.

Q. You have played a whole week with the serve clock. Do you have any impressions on that, whether that’s good for the game or whether it made any difference to you?
FELIX AUGER-ALIASSIME: I don’t know. Maybe I’m not the right person to ask because I don’t really look at it. It’s kind of — I try really not to look at it, because it’s kind of in weird places. Sometimes you have to look up, so I’m not really comfortable with that.

It’s good. I think it helps everyone around and I think it helps the umpire to make the calls. Yeah, it’s not bad.

 

Bethanie Mattek-Sands

Lucie Safarova

Press Conference

MATTEK SANDS-SAFAROVA/Garcia-Mladenovic

2-6, 7-6, 6-4

THE MODERATOR: Questions, please.

Q. You like that?
BETHANIE MATTEK-SANDS: We were just looking at the names.

LUCIE SAFAROVA: Pretty good company.

Q. Your names will join those names. How does that feel?
BETHANIE MATTEK-SANDS: That’s pretty cool.

LUCIE SAFAROVA: Amazing.

BETHANIE MATTEK-SANDS: Some greats on there. I just noticed that Martina Hingis won it in ’98. That’s pretty impressive for her to be No. 1 right now, or 2.

Q. So talk about, first of all, you guys were down. What a turnaround in the second set; obviously carried it right into the third. Talk about the match.
BETHANIE MATTEK-SANDS: Yeah, you know what? It was a little bit of a slow start, but I’ve gotta give credit to our opponents. They came out playing big, serving big, making all their rolls, ripping returns.

You know, I think one of the things that we do really well is we don’t get too down no matter what the score is. We’re really positive.

It was funny. I think Lucie had more energy than me. She was carrying me on her back and getting me pumped up.

LUCIE SAFAROVA: Any time.

BETHANIE MATTEK-SANDS: But that’s what good friends and partner do. It happens sometimes. You play a team that’s playing good or you might not be making all the shots, but any match can turn around in a couple of points.

That’s just a matter of sticking to it.

Q. You guys seem like you’re genuinely good friends.
BETHANIE MATTEK-SANDS: Or we’re really good at faking it. I don’t think we’re that good of actors, otherwise I might have to consider a career switch.

Q. Talk about the chemistry between the two of you. How much does that contribute now, just your third Grand Slam title?
LUCIE SAFAROVA: It’s amazing. Third.

No, I think the chemistry is great. We complement each other so well. Our games just fit. We have done so well in all the tournaments, and now this year has been tough year for us because I have been out for half a year with my sickness and missed Australia.

Then Bethanie broke her finger just before French Open, so that kind of like…

But we both stick together and believed that once we are again strong, healthy —

BETHANIE MATTEK-SANDS: Feeling good.

LUCIE SAFAROVA: — and feeling that we can do this, and we did, so it’s amazing.

Q. Going forward, are you sniffing a career Grand Slam?
BETHANIE MATTEK-SANDS: We actually just got asked that on the court now. They were talking about Wimbledon. I was like, We have so many tournaments before Wimbledon. I don’t even know if we can start to think about it.

I mean, really, we’re enjoying the moment. I mean, this is a huge win. I mean, we both looked at each other and we said, We have a US Open trophy right now. I think especially being 9/11, it’s really a big thing to enjoy the people you’re with, enjoy the moment. I get a little emotional.

LUCIE SAFAROVA: No, our thoughts and prayers are with the families. I know it’s a tough day for everyone.

BETHANIE MATTEK-SANDS: So it was really special to win it today, I think.

Q. Can you talk about how you first got together?
LUCIE SAFAROVA: My coach Rob.

BETHANIE MATTEK-SANDS: Yeah, it was a blind date, actually. We both didn’t have partners for Australia.

LUCIE SAFAROVA: You were coming back after injury.

BETHANIE MATTEK-SANDS: I hadn’t actually played a lot of doubles. I actually didn’t have a ranking. Lucie took a chance on me. (Smiling.)

It was like, all right, come on.

LUCIE SAFAROVA: Knew here before but not so well and never played obviously together. Then I asked her if we should do like Sydney before the Australian Open. She’s like, No, I’m playing with Sania already.

BETHANIE MATTEK-SANDS: I was like, We’ll be good. We’ll just roll with it in Australia. All good.

LUCIE SAFAROVA: And then we won the Grand Slam.

BETHANIE MATTEK-SANDS: That’s pretty good.

Q. It’s an Olympic year and so any teams that are like different countries, I’m sure you maybe would have thought, maybe I should play, like, Bethanie, full time with Coco theoretically or Lucie practiced with Barbora, and even with injuries and everything, you stuck together as a tour team. Can you talk through that decision? Was it ever tenuous at all?
BETHANIE MATTEK-SANDS: I don’t think so. I mean, I played with Coco at Indian Wells. I think just kind of with my track record, I feel, you know, either I mesh with a partner or I don’t.

I don’t feel like I need, you know, 50 tournaments to get used to. I was really confident going into the Olympics with Coco. And if something happened to Lucie where she couldn’t play, you know, playing with Coco was fun.

Me and Lucie talked about our schedule and we really stuck to that, because that’s what we had talked about. It wasn’t — I didn’t feel like I needed to kind of play a guessing game, you know, whether it was with Coco or with Lucie.

I felt confident with both of them by me. Me and Lucie, had a lot of fun here. (Giving dap.)

Q. As an American, 9/11 has touched people from all nationalities around the world. As an American, to be playing on this very heavy, significant day, winning a Grand Slam in your home country, I mean, I can only imagine the emotions that you must have felt.
BETHANIE MATTEK-SANDS: Yeah, and actually when we got to the locker room the news was on when they were reading all the names. You know, it kind of put things in perspective. As much fun as we’re having and as much joy as we get out of competing and all of the glitz and glamour of, you know, playing the finals of the US Open, it’s humbling to know that you don’t know what’s going to happen in the future.

You know, it’s something where I just — I really appreciate the moment, my family, and my friends, because you don’t know what’s going to happen.

You know, I really — it is an emotional day. And it was funny. I was going to retire my American flag socks after the gold medal match. I said, You know what? For the final of the US Open, 9/11, have to bring them out. Had a great crowd and great support. It was really special for me to win it here today in New York.

 

Kayla Day

Press Conference

K. DAY/V. Kuzmova

6-3, 6-2

THE MODERATOR: Questions, please.

Q. It was tough for you after last night to come back. Got off to a really good start. How did you do that? How were you able to recover after that late night last night?
KAYLA DAY: I think I was really able to mentally set aside what had happened last night and just move on, because I knew I had a really important match today.

I knew I had to forget about it, and that’s what I did.

Q. Is that something you have had success with to this stage in your career, or is this like something that you really summoned the focus to do it?
KAYLA DAY: No, I think I’m pretty good about, you know, leaving the past behind me and just focusing on being in the moment. And, yeah.

Q. Congratulations. You played in the main draw in the women’s event and the juniors. What’s the transition like going back and forth mentally? Or is it the same?
KAYLA DAY: Well, I think mentally it was a little bit hard just because it’s such a long time being here. I have been here for I think over three weeks.

But my coach told me I needed to separate the two tournaments, like to really make sure when I come back to play juniors like I’m coming to play a new tournament.

Q. You missed a chance to go up 5-1, I think it was in the first set, and then you got down Love-40 on your serve. Holding on in that game must have been a huge confidence boost for you.
KAYLA DAY: Yeah, that was a huge game. I got down Love-40 and then I served some really good serves. I was a little bit — getting a little bit nervous at that point, but after that game I felt really confident.

Q. You had a tough semifinal against Bianca and you kind of turned that around. What enabled you to turn that around? And then after the break for the heat, I know this is a few days ago, after the break for the heat you came out storming. Why do you think that was?
KAYLA DAY: I think I was definitely nervous in the first set and I didn’t fully believe in myself. Then at the beginning of the second and after like the heat break, I really believed in myself that I could do it.

I was really confident and going for my shots more and being more aggressive.

Q. You had a tough match against Madison earlier in the main draw. Have you spoke to her or any of the American women on tour since then? Any words of wisdom?
KAYLA DAY: No, I haven’t talked to any of them since.

Q. What does the rest of the year look like for you?
KAYLA DAY: I think I’m going to play a lot of pro circuit tournaments in the U.S. I haven’t decided if I’m going to play the junior tournaments at the end of the year, but definitely a lot of pro circuits to build up my ranking to be able to make the Grand Slam quallies next year.

Q. Where does school fit in?
KAYLA DAY: Um, I find a way to fit it in. I haven’t started school yet this year, so that’s nice. I start a little bit later than normally like other people do, I guess.

But whenever I have like a free day or like a weekend when I don’t have anything I do it then and try and get — either catch up before — get ahead before a trip or, you know, catch up after. (Smiling.)

It’s hard, but I manage to do it.

Q. What does it mean to you to sort of add your name to the illustrious list of Grand Slam junior champions?
KAYLA DAY: It means so much. It’s really great. I knew that coming into the match like an American or like somebody from outside of Europe hadn’t won — a girl hadn’t won a junior slam in like four years, so it means so much to me to be able to play for America and win.

Q. The ITF tells me you’re the No. 1 junior player in the world now after winning today. Did you know that?
KAYLA DAY: No, I didn’t know that.

Q. How important would that be, you know, to finish the year? Will that change your schedule to make sure that you finish No. 1?
KAYLA DAY: No. I haven’t really thought about that. I know that there is some type of rule that if you finish a certain ranking or if you get to the finals of a slam you get more tournaments.

I think that would be the most beneficial thing for me since I’m still quite young and I can’t play a full pro schedule.

Q. Where does this win rank obviously in your young career? And when you look back on all the different things that have happened these past few weeks, how do you see these two weeks how they unfolded?
KAYLA DAY: These were like the best two weeks of my life. Every day was great.

I had so much fun every single day, and it was just a great experience overall.

Q. How will you celebrate? Do you have any plans for that?
KAYLA DAY: No, not yet. (Smiling.) I’m sure I’ll think of something.

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Stan Wawrinka Beats Novak Djokovic to Win US Open Title for Third Major Championship

Stan Wawrinka

Stan Wawrinka

(September 11, 2016) FLUSHING MEADOWS, NY – Stan Wawrinka stands just a Wimbledon title away from a career Grand Slam. The Swiss, ranked No. 3 beat 12-time major champion and No. 1 Novak Djokovic 6-7(1), 6-4, 7-5, to win the US Open on Sunday evening for this third major championship.

Wawrinka, coming into the match was 4-19 against Djokovic, but last beat the Serb in last year’s French Open final. The Swiss is now 3-0 in major finals.

Djokovic took a 3-0 lead to begin the match, but Wawrinka broke back in the ninth game when Djokovic was serving for the set at 5-3. The set went to a tiebreaker in which Djokovic destroyed his opponent 7-1.

The next set saw the Swiss go up a break first and take a 4-1 lead, but the Serb fought back to get even on serve to get to 3-4. Serving at 4-5, the two-time US Open winner double faulted to give back the break and lose the set to Wawrinka 6-4.

In the third set Wawrinka broke serve at 5-6 from 30-0 down to win the set.

Wawrinka struck early in the fourth set breaking Djokovic in the second game and holding for 3-0. Djokovic fought valiantly in the fourth game to gold his serve for 1-3. Djokovic took a medidal time out to have the trainer look at his feet. Wawrinka was very upset by this, saying that Djokovic should have done this on his own serve. Djokovic apologized to Wawrinka as he was getting treatment saying that he couldn’t stand. It was a six minute delay in play due to the mediacal time out.

Djokovic had three break points to draw even, but Wawrinka fought off the world No. 1 to hold for 4-1. Djokovic had an easy service game holding at love for 2-4. Wawrinka held on to win the set and the match 6-7(1), 6-4, 7-5, 6-3.

During the trophy ceremony, Wawrinka made note of Sunday being the anniversary of 9/11: “It’s been a big battle on the court … four hours,” Wawrinka said. “But I just want to remember what happened 15 years ago.”

“Yeah, this is amazing, for sure, amazing two weeks,” 31-year-old Wawrinka said in his news conference. “I spend so much time on the court. Today I knew it will be a really tough battle again playing the No. 1 player, Novak Djokovic, who always push you to play your best tennis if you want to beat him.

“That’s why I start to do, and I try to do. Was not only in the tennis side but physically and mentally was really tough, again. Honestly after the match I was completely empty. I put everything on the court. Not only today, but the past two weeks.

“Today I was trying to stay with him. I was trying to be tough with myself. Trying not to show anything. Not to show any pain. Not to show any cramp. Not to show anything. I was suffering on the court, but I’m happy and proud with what I have achieved today.”

“If you want to beat the No. 1 player in the world, you have to give everything,” he admitted.

“As I said the other day, you have to accept to suffer and you have almost to enjoy to suffer. Because I think this Grand Slam was the most painful, physically and mentally, Grand Slam that I ever played.

“As I said, I was feeling tired already at the beginning of the match. I was feeling the cramp coming in the third set. In the fourth set I had some pain, but most important was what was clear with Magnus before was not to show anything. Not to show anything. Give everything and keep fighting and go try to win it.”

Asked in press if Wif should be the “big 5″ instead of the” big 4″, Djokovic said,”Well, I mean, he deserves to be in the mix, no doubt about it. Stan won three Grand Slams now and three different ones; Olympic medal. Been around for so many years, and he plays best in the big matches.

“I mean, he definitely deserves to be mentioned in the mix of top players.”

When Wawrinka was asked about he said: “The Big 4, I’m really far from them. Just look the tournament they won, how many years they been there. If you look, yes, I have three Grand Slams. How many Masters 1000 have Murray? They have been there since ten years.

“They have not only been winning, but being in semifinal, final every time. That’s why I’m not there. I don’t want to be there. For me, there is no question about that. But I’m trying the best I can with my career.

“I’m really, really happy with what I’m doing so far. I’m proud of myself by winning three Grand Slam. This is something I never expect and dream about it, but I have them and I’m happy to take the trophy back home.”

Wawrinka has won his last 11 straight finals.

Wawrinka has now beaten Djokovic  from a set down on three occasions in majors – the 2014 Australian Open quarterfinals, the 2015 French Open  final and this year’s US Open final. Djokovic holds a 19-5 lead in their head-to-head records.

Looking at the match statistics, Wawrinka hit 46 winners to 51 unforced errors, while Djokovic hit 30 winners to 46 unforced errors. The Swiss was 6 for 10 on break points and the Serb was only three for 17.

“I just didn’t capitalize at all on my opportunities, said the 28-year-old Djokovic. “I had plenty of them, break points. It was a terrible conversion of the break points. Just terrible from my side.

“You know, in the matches like this, if you don’t use the opportunities, the other guy comes and takes it. And that’s what he did. That’s why I said he was more courageous, because he stepped in and played aggressive where I was kind of more waiting for things to happen.

“And that’s it.”

 

More to follow….

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