2014/11/23

Notes and Quotes from Day 1 of the ATP World Tour Finals

Singles+Official+Portrait

Photo by www.red-photographic.com

(November 9, 2014) LONDON – Notes and quotes from the Day 1  news conferences of the ATP World Tour Finals, which included Roger Federer, Kei Nishikori, Andy Murray and Milos Raonic.

 

Roger Federer

On the possibility of ending 2014 year with the No. 1 ranking:

“I have a small shot at world No. 1 after winning Shanghai. I mean, I’m happy it’s this way. But I think it’s highly unlikely it’s going to happen. If it does, obviously it’s great.

“But for me personally, it doesn’t really matter if it happened at the end of the year or any other week during the year, as long as you could get back to world No. 1 for one more time. I think that would be very special because I’ve been there and I know how much it would mean, because winning a tournament is a one‑week thing or a two‑week thing, but getting back to world No. 1 is an entirely different animal.

“I’ll try to get there, but obviously Novak is going to dictate as well what’s going to happen here.”

 

Asked about the greater rivalry of his career – Nadal or Djokovic:

“I feel a special connection towards Rafa just because we did, I don’t want to say come up together somewhat on the tour, but we did have a very strong, intense rivalry for many years, starting 2004 maybe. Especially we played each other that many times in finals of slams, which hasn’t been the case with the other players as much.

“I know Novak, the matches and the rivalry is nice. I really enjoy playing against him. It’s very evenly matched, you know. But I played him more often probably in semis than in finals most likely. I don’t know if that’s true, but that’s kind of how it felt like.

“Because me and Rafa were always 1 and 2 or 2 and 1 for so long. Murray and Djokovic always ended up in our semis for so long. So there was actually more opportunities to play those guys than Rafa, quite honestly, because getting to the finals is difficult.

“But then also I always like to look back and see who were my tougher players when I was coming up. In the beginning I struggled against the likes of Henman, Nalbandian, Hewitt, Roddick. So for me those were really interesting players to play against. I was lucky enough that Andre Agassi played as long as he did because I got to play him also, I think almost 15 times.”

 

Evaluating his win over Raonic:

“I think I played really well for probably one and a half sets. It was good to get off to a good start like I did against him at Cincinnati, and Wimbledon, I broke first game and sort of never looked back. I think when I had breakpoint in the second set, he was able to save that. When I was trying to hit a lob and he smashed it home, after that it became complicated. I don’t know why.

“I had a couple of games where I was up 40‑Love, and both times he came back and got into the game, which was probably my mistake. But it made me uncomfortable. I started to play a bit more passive. He started to become a bit more offensive. I actually think he was the better player from that moment on and deserved the set more than I did.

“Thankfully he didn’t play quite so well, like he did in Paris maybe. He gave me a few shots here and there, especially at the beginning of the breaker. I think those were crucial.

“I was happy to bring it home because it was very close at the end of the second.”

 

 

Milos Raonic

 

“But it’s obviously disappointing, very disappointing actually, the way I finished that second set off. “

 

“It took me more a set to find my way into the match because of playing Roger, not because of being here for the first time.”

 

“Every time you play Roger, the crowd’s on his side, even if he’s playing a local favorite. It’s hard for people to cheer against Roger.

“I’ve played him a few times. I’ve played home favorites on big courts also a few times, and in Davis Cup, many different situations. So it wasn’t any type of an issue.”

 

“I get pretty angry when I lose, so…

I’m going to have to learn how to slap myself out of it.”

 

Andy Murray

On his loss to Nishikori:

“I didn’t serve well enough today. I would say that was the biggest difference in the match. And when you’re not serving well, obviously on your own service games you want to be looking to dictate the points. When you’re returning, you kind of dictate when you have the opportunity. You don’t always have the chance if someone’s serving well.

“And, yeah, I didn’t serve well enough. He was able to dictate a lot of points, especially behind my second serve. That was, yeah, statistically the part of the match ‑‑ yeah, I mean, that was the part of the match where he had the upper hand. That was the difference. “

 

“It’s still obviously disappointing to lose the first match. And, yeah, I would have liked to have done better.”

 

“Obviously now I need to win my next two matches more than likely, and win them well if I want to go through. That’s going to be tricky because Milos obviously played fantastic last week in Paris, and Roger always plays well at this event.

 

“So I’m definitely going to have to play better if I want to get through.”

 

On the surface at the O2 Arena: “It’s quite lively, to be honest. It can be hard to control the ball that can bounce pretty high up on the serve, on the kick serve. Yeah, it’s quicker than the other courts.

 

“It’s definitely quicker than Valencia and Paris, I would say that. I don’t know exactly why that is, because the balls are the same and it’s the same court, I believe, manufacturer. I don’t know if it’s to do with just how big the stadium is, and it does get warm in there. I’m not sure. But, yeah, it’s quite lively.”

 

#458693032 / gettyimages.com

 Kei Nishikori

Asked about his confidence in his first–ever win over Murray:

“For sure I was different than these couple matches we played because this year I was, you know, much better player than before and more aggressive, you know, have bigger result this year.

 

“So that’s why I try not to think, you know, I can’t beat these guys, because I’ve been beating those top‑10 guys already. You know, this is even first time for me to play to a Final.

 

“But we’ve been playing a lot these players, and I was a little bit tight in the beginning, but, you know, I start feeling little more confidence in especially second set. I was very, very, you know, solid player.”

 

 

About playing in the O2 Arena:

“The court is same as Paris, so I was little bit used to, you know, playing this surface. But the stadium is huge. You know, I try not to look up too much because there was too many people on the top. Try to stay focus.

“Maybe when I walk into the stadium, I was nervous, but same time I was really excited to play with this crowd.

You know, I was thinking, you know, very honored to be here. You know, first time to be top‑eight player. I was really happy that I played good tennis on this situation.”

 

“There is, you know, still a long way to going to final and to win it. Play one match at a time and hope I can win couple matches here and go to semifinal.”

 

“I see Li Na and Srichaphan, I was looking up to them. I felt a lot of motivation from them.”

Tennis Panorama News is covering the ATP World Tour Finals at the O2 Arena in London.  Follow on twitter for live updates on @TennisNewsTPN.

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Chalkdust Chronicles: Federer rampant over Raonic

 

Chalkdust Chronicles: Federer rampant over Raonic

 

(November 9, 2014) LONDON – World Tour Finals rookie Milos Raonic got a baptism of fire on his debut, as memories of his Paris win and first victory over Roger Federer was all but banished from memory in a 25 minute first set.

 

From the offset, Federer raced out to a 3-0 lead and while Raonic spared his blushes of avoiding a bagel, getting a solitary game on the board, it was not enough to hold back the tide of errors flowing from his racquet.

 

Where in Paris he was serving like a demon, the lack of variety started to harm Raonic as he lacked the court smarts in the first set to try and stay with Federer.

 

It was a more competitive start for the Canadian, but not without some battling still with a big hold to stay in contention at the start of the second before being rewarded with the rarity of break points on the Federer serve, taking the World No. 2 seven minutes to hold as the big serving Canadian was starting to serve a lot better. It was the boost he needed as Federer started to go off the boil.

 

Frustratingly break point chances came again for Raonic in the all important 11th game, and some clutch play from Federer forced a tie-break, and the rhythm and form started to desert him a little as Federer build up a sharp 6-0 lead in the tie-break. He needed just the one match point, as he roasted Raonic 6-1 7-6(0).

 

It was a very satisfied Federer who laid his loss at Paris to rest, as he explained:

 

“I think I played really well for probably one and a half sets. It was good to get off to a good start like I did against him at Cincinnati, and Wimbledon. I had a couple of games where I was up 40‑Love, and both times he came back and got into the game, which was probably my mistake. But it made me uncomfortable. I started to play a bit more passive. He started to become a bit more offensive. I actually think he was the better player from that moment on and deserved the set more than I did.

 

“Thankfully he didn’t play quite so well, like he did in Paris maybe. He gave me a few shots here and there, especially at the beginning of the breaker. I think those were crucial.      I was happy to bring it home because it was very close at the end of the second.”

 

Milos Raonic

Milos Raonic

Raonic, on the other hand knows that he faces a real challenge, and so far has come of worse with one more debutant to go tomorrow, as Marin Cilic takes on Novak Djokovic.

 

“It’s obviously disappointing, very disappointing actually, the way I finished that second set off. He was a lot more consistent on his return games. In Paris, okay, I’d get free points when I hit aces, but today the big difference was when he would get his racquet on the ball, he would make me play all the time. He was giving me some shots in Paris in that sense, some quicker points.

 

“I believe he played better today. I believe I started off not playing nearly as well, but I think I sort of found that Paris level that I had against him come the second set. I think that’s why I was able to create some opportunities for myself.”

 

He will face Andy Murray who was edged out by the third newcomer to London Kei Nishikori.

 

“It’s a completely different match. Things are going to be quite different than the first match. We both, after today, have more so of an idea what we need to do different for the next round. It’s going to be about who necessarily adjusts better, who can play better come Tuesday night.”

 

Stan Wawrinka and Tomas Berdych will play the Monday day session and two-time defending champion Novak Djokovic starts his defense in the night session.

 

Tennis Panorama News is covering the ATP World Tour Finals at the O2 Arena in London.  Follow on twitter for live updates on @TennisNewsTPN.

 

 

RESULTS FOR SUNDAY, 9 NOVEMBER 2014

Singles – Group B Round Robin
[2] R Federer (SUI) d [7] M Raonic (CAN) 61 76(0)
[4] K Nishikori (JPN) d [5] A Murray (GBR) 64 64

Doubles – Group B Round Robin
[7] I Dodig (CRO) / M Melo (BRA) d [2] D Nestor (CAN) / N Zimonjic (SRB) 63 75
[6] M Granollers (ESP) / M Lopez (ESP) d [4] J Benneteau (FRA) / E Roger-Vasselin (FRA) 64 64

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Chalkdust Chronicles: Grey Day for Murray as he drops first round to newcomer Nishikori

Chalkdust Chronicles: Grey Day for Murray as he drops first round to newcomer Nishikori

 

(November 9, 2014) LONDON – Any fears that Andy Murray might have had about having to win fins back were answered with rousing cheers as the home-grown champion opened the day’s proceedings at the Barclays ATP world Tour Finals.

 

It looked to be starting so promisingly too. While Kei Nishikori starting nervously and Murray looking to be just that more solid, the poppy-sporting Brit drew first blood with a break to more rapturous cheering. However that was soon muted as Nishikori started generating a lot more pace and hustling Murray more, breaking him to love straight away.

 

It was a wasted opportunity of a battle that saw Murray squander a couple of breakpoints and from there Nishikori seemed to take heart, dealing the final break to seal the first set.

 

Maybe there is something about the day matches that tends to leave the atmosphere a bit flat, but Nishikori stunned them into silence racing into a 3-0 lead.

 

British hopes were roused a little when Murray stemmed the flow winning three games in a row to level at 4-4 in the second set and it looked as though the day crowd were going to get their money’s worth, but almost immediately the same lapse in concentration saw Murray broken, as Nishikori came through his London debut 6-4 6-4.

 

Murray had little choice but to be quite clinical with his review of the match.

 

“I didn’t serve well enough. He was able to dictate a lot of points, especially behind my second serve. Both of us struggled at the beginning of the match. The conditions, when you play with no one in there, it seemed like it was pretty full today. It’s obviously warmer, which then makes it quicker, the ball becomes a bit more lively.

 

“He definitely started playing better at the end of the first set and started feeling a bit more comfortable with those conditions.

 

Of course the benefit of the World Tour finals is that there are still two more round robin matches to go, but in a close group where it is maybe not as clear cut as perhaps the group of three Slam winners, Murray wasted a valuable chance to make life easy on himself.

 

“It’s harder to qualify when you lose your first match. But unlike the other events, you still have a chance to go through,” Murray said. “If this were anywhere else, I would be out of the tournament. You need to try to forget about today, work on some things tomorrow, and hopefully play better on Tuesday.”

 

For Nishikori it is a great start to cap a fantastic year for the record breaking Japanese player, who has battled to stay fit, despite having to call the trainer out briefly at the end of the first set.

 

“The court is same as Paris, so I was little bit used to playing this surface,” Nishikori said. “But the stadium is huge. You know, I try not to look up too much [and] try to stay focus. Maybe when I walk into the stadium, I was nervous, but same time I was really excited to play with this crowd. I was really happy that I played good tennis on this situation.”

 

Nishikori in the past has been almost a fragile little flower, so it has been pleasing to see him weather several weeks of tough competition, and he explained how he had improved in that area.

 

“I’m spending more time on the gym and also on the courts, too, you know, more practice during off‑season. Even when I’m on the tour, I try to do little bit of rehab and little bit of training. Maybe that’s one of the reason. I had couple injuries this year, you know, I had to retire couple matches, important matches. But I’ve been getting really strong, my body. Yeah, in US Open I played five sets. But I can able to finish seven matches first time, so I think I’m very strong physically.”

 

But with that comes the need to become tougher mentally, and given how shaky Nishikori’s first serve at times wandering around the cavern that is the O2, it was a testament to his improved strength of focus that he did not crumble when Murray fought back in the second set.

 

“I was [trying] to stay calm, even he was playing little better, you know, start playing little more consistent.

 

“First time I play Roger, couldn’t play anything ’cause I respect too much. I wasn’t go for win actually. I was just, you know, play tennis against my idol. That was one of the problem I had. But after couple years, I got mentally strong. I have to be strong to beat them. Maybe that’s one of the reason we Asia players has to be really strong. You have to believe yourself.”

 

It will be the turn of Group A to take to the court on Monday, with Group B playing again on Tuesday.

Tennis Panorama News is covering the ATP World Tour Finals at the O2 Arena in London.  Follow on twitter for live updates on @TennisNewsTPN.

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Four new champions crowned at the 2014 USTA/ITA National Indoor Intercollegiate Championships

From the ITA: FLUSHING, NY (Nov. 9) - Virginia’s Julia Elbaba and North Carolina’s Brayden Schnur completed an Atlantic Coast Conference (ACC) sweep of singles titles on Sunday at the 2014 USTA/ITA National Indoor Intercollegiate Championships at the USTA Billie Jean King Tennis Center and hosted by Columbia University.

 

In doubles, USC’s Yannick Hanfmann and Roberto Quiroz won the men’s doubles title, while UCLA’s Catherine Harrison and Kyle McPhillips captured the women’s doubles trophy in a Pac-12 Conference sweep of doubles glory.

 

From left to right: Former NYC Mayor David Dinkins, Brayden Schnur and ITA Executive Director David Benjamin

The singles finals were played first, with both champions grabbing the first set in roughly 30 minutes. In men’s singles, Schnur broke Vanderbilt’s Gonzales Austin for 4-3 in the first set by winning a crucial deuce point and held twice more to capture the first set 6-4.

 

The second set was a server’s battle, as each player held five straight times before the Commodore senior broke for 6-5, earning his chance to serve for a third set. However, Schnur broke right back to force a tiebreaker, familiar territory for the Tar Heel.
“It’s just a matter of refocusing, getting motivated again and coming out strong,” Schnur said.

 

After losing the first point of the tiebreaker, he rattled off six straight points to take complete control of the match, eventually winning 6-4, 7-6(2). Though winning the title was a huge moment for him, Schnur remembers being on the edge back on day one.

 

“It’s funny actually, I was down match points in my first-round match against the kid from Columbia (Winston Lin),” Schnur said. “Winning that match and pulling that out after saving match points was probably the highlight of my tournament.”

Julia Elbaba accepts her trophy from former NYC Mayor Dinkins

 

In the women’s singles championship, Elbaba strung together a second straight convincing win. After defeating Brooke Austin 6-2, 6-4 in yesterday’s semifinals, Elbaba nearly duplicated the score in a 6-2, 7-5 championship win over California’s Maegan Manasse.

 

Elbaba gained the early advantage when she broke Manasse’s serve at love for a 3-1 first-set lead. Elbaba consolidated the break with a hold for 4-1, and nearly broke Manasse again in the following game. Manasse served at deuce down 1-4, but it was a situation she’s become comfortable with. Yesterday, Manasse won the first set of her semifinal on a deuce point.

 

At 1-4 down on Sunday, Manasse’s strong serve propelled her to the net and she won the point, holding for 4-2. But Elbaba countered with a service hold of her own and broke Manasse for a second time to win the first set, 6-2.

 

The two players traded breaks back and forth into the heart of the second set. Elbaba broke the four-break streak first and led 4-3. She had two break chances in Manasse’s next service game, but the Cal sophomore held on at 30-40 and again at deuce to even the score at 4-all.

 

The no-ad format proved a bounty for Manasse, who won all five of the games that went to deuce.

 

Elbaba rebounded and held again for 5-4. Manasse followed suit with a hold of her own for 5-5. From there, Elbaba won eight of the next ten points, including four in a row to break Manasse’s serve for the championship, winning 6-2, 7-5.

 

Afterwards, Elbaba was proud of her ability to refocus after losing four games to no-ad scoring in the second set. “The four or five no-ad games I lost in the second set, it was really important for me to stay mentally tough,” Elbaba said. “It’s really easy to get distracted and lose confidence after that. On those points, anything can happen, and I was glad I was able to put it past me and focus on the future.”

 

The junior may be looking forward to the future, but today she relied on her past to get psyched up for this championship. One experience in particular helped her.

 

“I got to the finals of All-Americans in my first year, so I really did want to win this one,” Elbaba said. “That was the only kind of pressure I felt. I didn’t want to go home as a second place runner-up again. I just used that pressure to my advantage and told myself to stick with the plan, and that’s what we did.”

 

“I got a lot of confidence from this tournament,” she added. “I’m feeling really happy and I’m excited I can bring this to the program.”

 

From left to right: USC’s Roberto Quiroz, Krzysztof Kwinta and Yannick Hanfmann

In the men’s doubles final, the USC tandem traded holds with Illinois’ Ross Guignon and Tim Kopinski for six games before breaking the next two times to win the first set 6-3. Hanfmann held at love to start the second set, but Illinois won four of the next five games to gain the 4-2 edge.

 

The Illini served for the second set at 5-4 and held a 40-0 lead in the game, but the Trojans saved four set points and earned the break to level the match at 5-all. After USC held for a 6-5 lead, the Illini led 40-15 in the next game, but USC finished the match by saving three game points.

 

“We just started making returns,” Hanfmann said. “We were down in the last three games, but we just tried to take it point by point.”

 

On the decisive no-ad point, the Illini poached on the return of serve but the volley sailed long to give Hanfmann and Quiroz the 6-3, 7-5 win.

 

“I’m really happy, it’s a really big accomplishment,” Quiroz said. “We’ve been working really hard. To be able to win here is priceless.”

 

“Seeing them improve and mature every match and play better and better every single time is really what I’m looking for,” USC assistant coach Krzysztof Kwinta said. “The results are a side effect of that obviously. I’m very proud of the boys because they really matured here. It’s a great accomplishment.”

 

From left to right: UCLA’s Catherine Harrison, Rance Brown and Kyle McPhillips

In the women’s doubles championship, UCLA’s tandem of Harrison and McPhillips emerged victorious over Auburn’s Pleun Burgmans and Emily Flickinger, 6-2, 6-3. The score was a departure from Harrison and McPhillips’ semifinal victory yesterday, which went deep into a third-set tiebreaker, 7-5, 5-7, 11-9. Harrison was quick to add that today’s score did not tell the whole story.

 

“Auburn was really tough today,” she said. “The score was not indicative of how tough the match was, to be honest. There were a ton of no-ads that we won in the first, same with the second set, so it could have gone either way.”

 

After UCLA won the first set 6-2, Auburn gained a foothold and led UCLA 3-2 in the second set. But UCLA re-asserted itself and took control of the match, winning four straight games to close out the championship.

 

“We played solid the whole tournament but I felt like we improved every match,” McPhillips said. “And then in the finals was the peak of our performance.”

 

Down 2-3 in the second, UCLA held at love to even the set at 3-all. Next, a number of effective topspin lobs and timely poaches helped UCLA break Auburn’s serve at 15-40 for a 4-3 lead. UCLA held again for 5-3, and broke Auburn for the last time, this time at love, to win the second set and the championship, 6-3.

 

Afterwards, Harrison and McPhillips were congratulated by USC’s Hanfmann and Quiroz, their crosstown rival and winners of the men’s doubles championship.

 

“Have to represent the west coast,” Harrison said. “We’re Bro-jans. Or Tru-ins,” McPhillips said of the Bruins-Trojans camaraderie. Whatever they want to call it, you can’t argue with the results.

 

Also on Sunday, Baylor’s Julian Lenz, Florida’s Josie Kuhlman, Ohio State’s Kevin Metka and Ralf Steinbach and California’s Manasse and Denise Starr claimed consolation championships.
For additional information about the 2014 USTA/ITA National Indoor Intercollegiate Championships, please visit the official ITA event page.
About the ITA 

As the governing body of collegiate tennis, the ITA promotes both the athletic and academic achievements of the collegiate tennis community. The ITA, which is comprised of nearly 1,700 men’s and women’s varsity coaches representing over 1,200 institutions, administers numerous regional and national championships and the ITA College Tennis Rankings for over 20,000 college varsity student-athletes at NCAA Divisions I, II and III, NAIA and Junior College levels. The ITA also has a comprehensive awards program for players and coaches to honor excellence in academics, leadership and sportsmanship. The official ITA web site is ITAtennis.com.
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Czech Republic Wins Third Fed Cup in Four Years

(November 9, 2014) The Czech Republic won their third Fed Cup title in the last four years, after victories in 1975, 1983-85, 1988, 2011 and 2012.

Petra Kvitova held off a surging Angelique Kerber of Germany in reverse singles on Sunday 7-6 (5), 4-6, 6-4 to clinch the best-of-five series in Prague’s O2 Arena 3-0.

Kvitova came back from a 4-1 deficit in the final set to secure the Fed cup for the Czech Republic.

“It was an amazing match from both of us,” Kvitova said after the match. “It was a very big fight. I’m just glad that I did it. It was really up and down from the beginning of the match. It was always a big fight about every single point.”

 

FED CUP FINAL

 

CZECH REPUBLIC defeated GERMANY 3-1

Venue: O2 Arena, Prague, CZE (hard – indoors)

 

Petra Kvitova (CZE) d. Andrea Petkovic (GER) 62 64

Lucie Safarova (CZE) d. Angelique Kerber (GER) 64 64

Petra Kvitova (CZE) d. Angelique Kerber (GER) 76(5) 46 64

Lucie Safarova (CZE) v Andrea Petkovic (GER) not played

Julia Goerges/Sabine Lisicki (GER) d. Andrea Hlavackova/Lucie Hradecka (CZE) 64 63

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Fed Cup Day 1 – Final Results

fedcup

FED CUP BY BNP PARIBAS FINAL

 

Czech Republic leads Germany 2-0

Venue: O2 Arena, Prague, CZE (hard – indoors)

 

Petra Kvitova (CZE) d. Andrea Petkovic (GER) 62 64

Lucie Safarova (CZE) d. Angelique Kerber (GER) 64 64

Petra Kvitova (CZE) v Angelique Kerber (GER)

Lucie Safarova (CZE) v Andrea Petkovic (GER)

Andrea Hlavackova/Lucie Hradecka v Julia Goerges/Sabine Lisicki (GER)

 

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Bryans, Federer, Murray Honored In 2014 ATP World Tour Awards

From the ATP World Tour – (November 5, 2014) LONDON Bob and Mike Bryan, Roger Federer and Andy Murray have been honoured in the 2014 ATP World Tour Awards presented by Moët & Chandon. While the ATP World Tour No. 1 Presented by Emirates Award is still to be decided between Federer and Novak Djokovic, all the other award winners have been announced today with ceremonies planned to take place during the Barclays ATP World Tour Finals from 9 November.

Federer has been selected by his peers as winner of the Stefan Edberg Sportsmanship Award for a 10th time and by fans as the ATPWorldTour.com Fans’ Favourite presented by Moët & Chandon for a 12th straight year. Since 2003, Federer has won a record total of 29 ATP World Tour Awards.

Murray is the recipient of the Arthur Ashe Humanitarian Award, having taken part in fundraising exhibitions and campaigns over the past two years, and also raised awareness for the work of Unicef, United for Wildlife and Malaria No More.

The Bryan twins sweep the doubles awards for a sixth straight year, taking home ATP World Tour No. 1 Doubles Team presented by Emirates and ATPWorldTour.com Fans’ Favourite presented by Moët & Chandon for a record 10th time each.

The 17-year-old Borna Coric wins the ATP Star of Tomorrow Award presented by Emirates for being the youngest player ranked in the Top 100, while players have voted Roberto Bautista Agut as the Most Improved Player of the Year and recognised David Goffin as the Comeback Player of the Year.

Players will receive their awards, crafted by Lenox, in on-court ceremonies at The O2 throughout the tournament week.

USA Today’s Douglas Robson is the recipient of the Ron Bookman Media Excellence Award while the ATP Tournament of the Year awards will be announced in 2015.

Visit the ATP World Tour Awards section on ATPWorldTour.com

2014 ATP WORLD TOUR AWARDS presented by Moët & Chandon

ATP World Tour No. 1 presented by Emirates
(determined by Emirates ATP Rankings)
Novak Djokovic and Roger Federer will battle for the year-end No. 1 Emirates ATP Ranking at the Barclays ATP World Tour Finals. Both players are previous winners of ATP World Tour No. 1 presented by Emirates (Federer five times and Djokovic twice).

ATP World Tour No. 1 Doubles Team presented by Emirates
(determined by Emirates ATP Doubles Team Rankings)
Bob Bryan and Mike Bryan: The Americans will finish as the No. 1 duo in the Emirates ATP Doubles Team Rankings for a sixth successive year and record 10th time overall (2003, ‘05-07, ‘09-14). The 36-year-old twins won nine titles in 2014 including the US Open and six ATP World Tour Masters 1000.

ATP Star of Tomorrow Award presented by Emirates
(determined by Emirates ATP Rankings)
Borna Coric: This category in its second year, replacing the player-voted Newcomer of the Year, is awarded to the youngest player in the Top 100 of Emirates ATP Rankings as of 3 November. Coric, who began the season ranked outside the Top 300, broke into the Top 100 on 27 October and reached a career-high No. 92 this week. The 17-year-old Croatian reached the Vegeta Croatia Open Umag quarter-finals (l. to Fognini) in July and made his Grand Slam championship debut as a qualifier at the US Open (l. to Estrella Burgos in 2R), prior to beating World No. 3 Rafael Nadal en route to the Swiss Indoors Basel semi-finals in October. He also won one ATP Challenger Tour title.

Most Improved Player of the Year
(voted by ATP players)
Roberto Bautista Agut: The Spaniard climbed from a year-end No. 59 Emirates ATP Ranking last season to a career-high No. 14 in 2014. He claimed his first ATP World Tour title on the grass courts of the Topshelf Open (‘s-Hertogenbosch) in June, triumphed on his transition to clay a few weeks later at the MercedesCup in Stuttgart, and reached the indoor Kremlin Cup by Bank of Moscow hard-court final in Moscow in October. Bautista Agut also made a statement on some of the biggest stages: he reached the fourth round at the Australian Open after coming back to defeat World No. 5 Juan Martin del Potro in five sets in the second round, and advanced to the semi-finals at the Mutua Madrid Open, stopped only by Rafael Nadal. He finished the season with 45 match wins – 19 more than his previous career-high.

Comeback Player of the Year
(voted by ATP players)
David Goffin: After breaking his left wrist in September 2013, the Belgian returned to the courts at the beginning of the 2014 at No. 110 in the Emirates ATP Rankings. By the end of June, he had only recorded two main draw wins but after Wimbledon Goffin couldn’t stop winning. He compiled a 44-4 match record from July onwards (inclusive of matches on the ATP World Tour, ATP Challenger Tour and qualifying). His perfect month of July included three straight Challenger titles and his first ATP World Tour title at the Austrian Open (Kitzbühel), all in back-to-back weeks. He extended his unbeaten streak to 25 matches by qualifying and reaching the Winston-Salem Open quarter-finals. After a third-round run at the US Open (l. to Dimitrov), the 23 year old went on another winning streak of 16 matches – with titles at the Moselle Open and Mons Challenger – prior to a runner-up finish at the Swiss Indoors Basel (l. to Federer). He will finish the season at a career-high of No. 22 in the Emirates ATP Rankings.

Stefan Edberg Sportsmanship
(voted by ATP players)
Roger Federer: Fellow players voted the Swiss as the winner of the Stefan Edberg Sportsmanship Award for the 10th time and fourth year in a row. He also won the award six straight years from 2004-09. Marin Cilic, Grigor Dimitrov and Kei Nishikori were also nominated in this category.

Arthur Ashe Humanitarian of the Year
(awarded by ATP)
Andy Murray: One of Murray’s best friends, former player Ross Hutchins, was diagnosed with Hodgkin’s lymphoma, though thankfully his cancer went into remission. Another of Murray’s friends from British tennis, Elena Baltacha, was diagnosed with cancer of the liver and the sport was in mourning this year when she passed away at the age of 30. Wanting to help, Murray took part in fundraising exhibitions for Hutchins and Baltacha at Queen’s Club the past two summers, and this autumn he appeared with comedian Richard Ayoade in ‘Andy Murray: The Movie’, a sketch that was part of Channel 4’s ‘Stand Up To Cancer’ programming. Murray has also raised awareness for the work of Unicef, United for Wildlife and Malaria No More.

ATPWorldTour.com Fans’ Favourite presented by Moët & Chandon (Singles)
(voted by fans)
Roger Federer: The Swiss has been voted ATPWorldTour.com Fans’ Favourite presented by Moët & Chandon for a record 12th straight year, receiving 65 per cent of all votes cast. Rafael Nadal finished second, followed by Grigor Dimitrov, Novak Djokovic and Kei Nishikori.

ATPWorldTour.com Fans’ Favourite presented by Moët & Chandon (Doubles)
(voted by fans)
Bob Bryan and Mike Bryan: The Bryan twins received 45 per cent of votes to be named the ATPWorldTour.com Fans’ Favourite presented by Moët & Chandon for a record 10th time. Wimbledon champions Vasek Pospisil and Jack Sock came in as the second most popular duo, followed by Roland Garros champions Julien Benneteau and Edouard Roger-Vasselin.

Ron Bookman Media Excellence
(awarded by ATP)
Douglas Robson: San Francisco-based Robson has been the lead tennis writer since 2003 for USA Today, one of the largest American newspapers. He has been a journalist for two decades covering a variety of sports, business and general-interest topics.

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Tennis Channel to Air Coverage of the ATP World Tour Finals

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LOS ANGELES, Nov. 4, 2014 – Tennis Channel has complete coverage of the 2014 Barclays ATP World Tour Finals in London, Nov. 9-16. The seven-day season-ending tournament will see Novak Djokovic attempt to fend off Roger Federer’s bid to reclaim the World No. 1 ranking as well as famed doubles brothers Bob and Mike Bryan chase a fourth doubles crown. The network will feature more than 120 total hours of match coverage, with over 50 live hours, of the best-eight singles players and doubles teams of the 2014 season. The first tournament telecast airs at 7 a.m. ET, Sunday, Nov. 9, with the initial matches of the day.

The Barclays ATP World Tour Finals hosts the world’s top-eight qualifying singles players and doubles teams. Separated into two groups of four, each singles player and doubles team will compete in a round-robin format, playing a minimum of three matches before the top two of each group advance to the single-elimination semifinals in the O2 Arena in London.

Tennis Channel’s coverage of the finals will begin each day at 7 a.m. ET, except Sunday, Nov. 16, the last day of the championship when play begins at 10:30 a.m. ET. The network’s typical daily schedule will consist of two match blocks of live on-air play – a morning session beginning at 7 a.m. ET and an afternoon session at 1 p.m. ET. After each session, Tennis Channel will feature match encores, which will be telecast from 11 a.m.-1:00 p.m., 5:30 p.m.-8 p.m., and 4:30 a.m.-7 a.m. most days of the week. For a complete schedule or for more information, visit www.tennischannel.com\schedule.

World No. 1 Djokovic leads the rest of the qualifiers by more than 1,300 points. However, he will have to contend with Federer, who is challenging his year-end No. 1 spot, as well as Australian Open champ Stanislas Wawrinka and US Open winner Marin Cilic. World No. 3 Rafael Nadal was forced to pull out from the tournament with appendicitis, opening up the field for additional year-end challengers. Also stepping onto the court in London will be Andy Murray, Kei Nishikori, Tomas Berdych and Milos Raonic, setting the stage for a battle of Grand Slam proportions. Spaniard David Ferrer will serve as the tournament’s first alternate

In addition to the Bryan brothers, the seven other teams that have qualified to compete in the men’s finals are: Daniel Nestor and Nenad Zimonjic; Alexander Peya and Bruno Soares; Julien Benneteau and Edouard Roger-Vasselin; Jean-Julien Rojer and Horia Tecau; Marcel Granollers and Marc Lopez; Ivan Dodig and Marcelo Melo; and Lukasz Kubot and Robert Lindstedt.

Tennis Channel’s 2014 ATP World Tour Finals Schedule: (All matches are live unless otherwise indicated.)

 

Date                                             Time (ET)                                       Event

Sunday, Nov. 9 7 a.m. -11 a.m.; 1 p.m.-5 p.m. Doubles and Singles Round-Robin Matches
Monday, Nov. 10 7 a.m. -11 a.m.; 1 p.m.-5 p.m. Doubles and Singles Round-Robin Matches
Tuesday, Nov. 11 7 a.m. -11 a.m.; 1 p.m.-5 p.m. Doubles and Singles Round-Robin Matches
Wednesday, Nov. 12 7 a.m. -11 a.m.; 1 p.m.-5 p.m. Doubles and Singles Round-Robin Matches
Thursday, Nov. 13 7 a.m. -11 a.m.; 1 p.m.-3 p.m. Doubles and Singles Round-Robin Matches
Friday, Nov. 14 7 a.m. -11 a.m.; 12:45 p.m.-2:30 p.m. Doubles and Singles Round-Robin Matches
Saturday, Nov. 15 7 a.m. -11 a.m.; 1 p.m.-5 p.m. Doubles and Singles Semifinals
Sunday, Nov. 16 10:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m.; 8 p.m.- 12 a.m.*(Delay) Doubles and Singles Final

 

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Djokovic Takes 27-Match Indoor Win Streak into ATP World Tour Finals

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(November 3, 2014) Two-time defending ATP World Tour Finals champion Novak Djokovic takes his 27-match indoor match winning streak into the O2 Arena next week to defend his year end crown and seal his No. 1 ranking for the season.

The draw for the year-end was made on Monday. Here are the singles and doubles groups:

 

  GROUPS

Singles – Group A
[1] N Djokovic (SRB)
[3] S Wawrinka (SUI)
[6] T Berdych (CZE)
[8] M Cilic (CRO)
 
Singles – Group B
[2] R Federer (SUI)
[4] K Nishikori (JPN)
[5] A Murray (GBR)
[7] M Raonic (CAN)
 
Doubles – Group A
[1] B Bryan (USA) / M Bryan (USA)
[3] A Peya (AUT) / B Soares (FRA)
[5] J Rojer (NED) / H Tecau (ROU)
[8] L Kubot (POL) / R Lindstedt (SWE)
 
Doubles – Group B
[2] D Nestor (CAN) / N Zimonjic (SRB)
[4] J Benneteau (FRA) / E Roger-Vasselin (FRA)
[6] M Granollers (ESP) / M Lopez (ESP)
[7] I Dodig (CRO) / M Melo (BRA)

Kei Nishikori leads off the singles play in the November 9 afternoon session, while Roger Federer will face off against Milos Raonic in the evening session. Day 2 afternoon singles action will pit Stan Wawrinka against Tomas Berdych while Djokovic will play against US Open winner Marin Cilic in the evening session.

Djokovic has a record of 41-5 against his group while Federer’s record against his round-robin opponents is 19-14. Should Djokovic gp 3-0 in his group, he would clinch the No. 1 ranking for the year.

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Great Britain to Host Davis Cup Tie versus U. S. in Glasgow

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(November 3, 2014) The Lawn Tennis Association (LTA) has announced that the upcoming Davis Cup World Group tie between Great Britain and the United States will take place at the Emirates Arena in Glasgow.

 

The first round tie will take place from March 6-8 March, 2015, with the winners set to face either France or Germany in the quarter-finals. This is Great Britain’s second straight year in the World Group after the team maintained their position within the world’s elite by making the quarter-finals in 2014. Great Britain upset the Americans in San Diego with a 3-1 victory in this year’s first round.

 

Leon Smith, Captain of the Aegon GB Davis Cup Team, said: “We’ve had absolutely brilliant experiences of playing in Glasgow during recent ties and the crowd always creates an unbelievable atmosphere. It’s going to be a huge deal with Andy heading back to play in Scotland for the first time since he won Wimbledon last year. It will no doubt be an emotional experience for all of us, just like it was when Andy came back to Glasgow and played against Luxembourg in 2011. You could see how much the crowd were desperate to see him play and we’re delighted to now be in a position to bring a World Group tie to a city that has given us so much support over the years.”

 

World No. 6 Andy Murray added: “I’m really excited about coming to Glasgow to play in a World Group tie. It’s going to be a huge week for our team and I’m looking forward to be able to play in front a home crowd. I did play Davis Cup in Glasgow a few years ago where we received incredible support, but this is a World Group tie so it’s a massive deal and we’ll be doing everything we can to get the win.”

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