June 29, 2016

On the Purple Carpet – Fashion Shines at WTA Pre-Wimbledon Party

LONDON, ENGLAND - JUNE 23:  Caroline Wozniacki attends the annual WTA Pre-Wimbledon Party presented by Dubai Duty Free at the Kensington Roof Gardens on June 23, 2016 in London, England.  (Photo by Stuart C. Wilson/Getty Images for WTA Tour)

LONDON, ENGLAND – JUNE 23: Caroline Wozniacki attends the annual WTA Pre-Wimbledon Party presented by Dubai Duty Free at the Kensington Roof Gardens on June 23, 2016 in London, England. (Photo by Stuart C. Wilson/Getty Images for WTA Tour)

LONDON, ENGLAND - JUNE 23:  Garbine Muguruza attends the annual WTA Pre-Wimbledon Party presented by Dubai Duty Free at the Kensington Roof Gardens on June 23, 2016 in London, England.  (Photo by Stuart C. Wilson/Getty Images for WTA Tour)

LONDON, ENGLAND – JUNE 23: Garbine Muguruza attends the annual WTA Pre-Wimbledon Party presented by Dubai Duty Free at the Kensington Roof Gardens on June 23, 2016 in London, England. (Photo by Stuart C. Wilson/Getty Images for WTA Tour)

LONDON, ENGLAND - JUNE 23:  Bethanie Mattek-Sands attends the annual WTA Pre-Wimbledon Party presented by Dubai Duty Free at the Kensington Roof Gardens on June 23, 2016 in London, England.  (Photo by Stuart C. Wilson/Getty Images for WTA Tour)

LONDON, ENGLAND – JUNE 23: Bethanie Mattek-Sands attends the annual WTA Pre-Wimbledon Party presented by Dubai Duty Free at the Kensington Roof Gardens on June 23, 2016 in London, England. (Photo by Stuart C. Wilson/Getty Images for WTA Tour)

LONDON, ENGLAND - JUNE 23:  Ana Ivanovic attends the annual WTA Pre-Wimbledon Party presented by Dubai Duty Free at the Kensington Roof Gardens on June 23, 2016 in London, England.  (Photo by Stuart C. Wilson/Getty Images for WTA Tour)

LONDON, ENGLAND – JUNE 23: Ana Ivanovic attends the annual WTA Pre-Wimbledon Party presented by Dubai Duty Free at the Kensington Roof Gardens on June 23, 2016 in London, England. (Photo by Stuart C. Wilson/Getty Images for WTA Tour)

LONDON, ENGLAND - JUNE 23:  Madison Keys attends the annual WTA Pre-Wimbledon Party presented by Dubai Duty Free at the Kensington Roof Gardens on June 23, 2016 in London, England.  (Photo by Stuart C. Wilson/Getty Images for WTA Tour)

LONDON, ENGLAND – JUNE 23: Madison Keys attends the annual WTA Pre-Wimbledon Party presented by Dubai Duty Free at the Kensington Roof Gardens on June 23, 2016 in London, England. (Photo by Stuart C. Wilson/Getty Images for WTA Tour)

LONDON, ENGLAND - JUNE 23:  Laura Robson attends the annual WTA Pre-Wimbledon Party presented by Dubai Duty Free at the Kensington Roof Gardens on June 23, 2016 in London, England.  (Photo by Stuart C. Wilson/Getty Images for WTA Tour)

LONDON, ENGLAND – JUNE 23: Laura Robson attends the annual WTA Pre-Wimbledon Party presented by Dubai Duty Free at the Kensington Roof Gardens on June 23, 2016 in London, England. (Photo by Stuart C. Wilson/Getty Images for WTA Tour)

LONDON, ENGLAND - JUNE 23:  Simona Halep attends the annual WTA Pre-Wimbledon Party presented by Dubai Duty Free at the Kensington Roof Gardens on June 23, 2016 in London, England.  (Photo by Stuart C. Wilson/Getty Images for WTA Tour)

LONDON, ENGLAND – JUNE 23: Simona Halep attends the annual WTA Pre-Wimbledon Party presented by Dubai Duty Free at the Kensington Roof Gardens on June 23, 2016 in London, England. (Photo by Stuart C. Wilson/Getty Images for WTA Tour)

LONDON, ENGLAND - JUNE 23:  Sloane Stephens attends the annual WTA Pre-Wimbledon Party presented by Dubai Duty Free at the Kensington Roof Gardens on June 23, 2016 in London, England.  (Photo by Stuart C. Wilson/Getty Images for WTA Tour)

LONDON, ENGLAND – JUNE 23: Sloane Stephens attends the annual WTA Pre-Wimbledon Party presented by Dubai Duty Free at the Kensington Roof Gardens on June 23, 2016 in London, England. (Photo by Stuart C. Wilson/Getty Images for WTA Tour)

LONDON, ENGLAND - JUNE 23:  Petra Kvitova attends the annual WTA Pre-Wimbledon Party presented by Dubai Duty Free at the Kensington Roof Gardens on June 23, 2016 in London, England.  (Photo by Stuart C. Wilson/Getty Images for WTA Tour)

LONDON, ENGLAND – JUNE 23: Petra Kvitova attends the annual WTA Pre-Wimbledon Party presented by Dubai Duty Free at the Kensington Roof Gardens on June 23, 2016 in London, England. (Photo by Stuart C. Wilson/Getty Images for WTA Tour)

LONDON, ENGLAND - JUNE 23:  Heather Watson attends the annual WTA Pre-Wimbledon Party presented by Dubai Duty Free at the Kensington Roof Gardens on June 23, 2016 in London, England.  (Photo by Stuart C. Wilson/Getty Images for WTA Tour)

LONDON, ENGLAND – JUNE 23: Heather Watson attends the annual WTA Pre-Wimbledon Party presented by Dubai Duty Free at the Kensington Roof Gardens on June 23, 2016 in London, England. (Photo by Stuart C. Wilson/Getty Images for WTA Tour)

LONDON, ENGLAND - JUNE 23:  Sorana Cirstea attends the annual WTA Pre-Wimbledon Party presented by Dubai Duty Free at the Kensington Roof Gardens on June 23, 2016 in London, England.  (Photo by Stuart C. Wilson/Getty Images for WTA Tour)

LONDON, ENGLAND – JUNE 23: Sorana Cirstea attends the annual WTA Pre-Wimbledon Party presented by Dubai Duty Free at the Kensington Roof Gardens on June 23, 2016 in London, England. (Photo by Stuart C. Wilson/Getty Images for WTA Tour)

LONDON, ENGLAND - JUNE 23:  Serena Williams attends the annual WTA Pre-Wimbledon Party presented by Dubai Duty Free at the Kensington Roof Gardens on June 23, 2016 in London, England.  (Photo by Stuart C. Wilson/Getty Images for WTA Tour)

LONDON, ENGLAND – JUNE 23: Serena Williams attends the annual WTA Pre-Wimbledon Party presented by Dubai Duty Free at the Kensington Roof Gardens on June 23, 2016 in London, England. (Photo by Stuart C. Wilson/Getty Images for WTA Tour)

 

(June 23, 2016) Tennis superstars and celebrities from the worlds of sport, lifestyle and culture came together at The Roof Gardens, Kensington for one of the most anticipated parties of the summer: the WTA Pre-Wimbledon Party presented by Dubai Duty Free.

Serena Williams, Caroline Wozniacki, Ana Ivanovic, Eugenie Bouchard and more walked the “Purple Carpet” in London ahead of The Championships, Wimbledon.

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Mary Joe Fernandez and Jay Berger Named Coaches of 2016 U.S. Olympic Tennis Team

USTA Shield Logo

WHITE PLAINS, N.Y., June 23, 2016 – The USTA, the national governing body for the sport of tennis in the U.S., today announced that U.S. Fed Cup captain Mary Joe Fernandez and USTA Player Development Head of Men’s Tennis, Jay Berger, have been named, respectively, as the women’s and men’s coaches of the 2016 U.S. Olympic Tennis Team.  In addition, Dan James, Head U.S. National Wheelchair Team Coach, has been named coach of the U.S. Paralympic Wheelchair Tennis Team.

The 2016 Olympic Games will be held August 5-21 in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, with the tennis competition being staged August 6-14 at the Barra Tennis Center. The 2016 Paralympic Games will be held September 7-18 with the tennis competition scheduled for September 9-16 at the same venue.  

“Each of the coaches who have been chosen to lead our U.S. teams has outstanding credentials and have proven themselves as great leaders and motivators,” said Katrina Adams, USTA Chairman, CEO and President. “The Olympics and Paralympics provide a magnificent stage for us to showcase the very best of tennis, and we are extremely fortunate to have Mary Joe, Jay, and Dan serve as coaches for our teams—and ambassadors for our sport—as we go for the gold in 2016.”

“To be able to represent the U.S. for a fourth time at the Olympics is a tremendous honor,” said Fernandez, 1992 & 1996 Olympic Doubles Gold Medalist.  “I’m excited and looking forward to helping the top American women as they look to capture medals in Rio.”  

“It’s the greatest honor to represent the United States, especially for the third time at the Olympics,” said Berger.  “I am looking forward to working with the guys in Rio and know the team is excited to climb up on the medal podium.”

“I could not be more proud to be coaching these great athletes and to be representing Team USA once again,” said James.  “The Paralympic Games are an amazing event as they offer these athletes the opportunity to showcase their sport and be seen by millions of fans around the world.”

The 2016 U.S. Olympic Tennis Team will consist of up to six men and six women, with a maximum of four men and four women competing in the singles competition and a maximum of two men’s and two women’s teams competing in doubles. The U.S. also will be able to place a maximum of two teams in the mixed doubles competition, which will be contested at the Olympic Games for just the second time.  The Olympic Tennis Team player nominations are made using the ATP World Tour and WTA rankings as of June 6.  The U.S. Olympic nominations are under the review of the ITF and will be formally announced in the coming weeks pursuant to the ITF’s Qualifications and Appeals timeline.

The United States has won 21 Olympic medals in men’s and women’s tennis—more than any other nation—since the sport returned as a full medal sport in 1988.  U.S. players have won 15 medals at the Paralympic Games, including the gold medal every year in the Quad doubles division since that event’s inception in 2004.

The 2016 U.S. Paralympic Wheelchair Tennis Team will consist of a maximum of four men and four women in the wheelchair singles competition, with no more than two doubles teams in the wheelchair doubles competition.  In the quad wheelchair competition, a maximum of three players may compete in the event, with a maximum of three in the singles event and one team in the doubles event. Team nominations will be based on ITF Wheelchair Tennis World Rankings as of May 23, 2016. The Paralympic team will be announced the week of June 27.

It will be the seventh time that wheelchair tennis has appeared at the Paralympic Games as a full medal sport, having made its debut as a demonstration sport at Seoul 1988. Wheelchair tennis was fully admitted to the Paralympics at Barcelona 1992, where men’s and women’s singles and doubles were contested. After further successful events at Atlanta 1996 and Sydney 2000, the quad class was introduced at Athens 2004. Paralympic tennis is an open competition, eligible to those athletes with a mobility-related disability. All competitors must compete in a wheelchair.

The USTA was officially designated by the USOC as the national governing body for the Paralympic sport of wheelchair tennis in June 2002, becoming the first Olympic national governing body to earn this recognition.  As the national governing body for wheelchair tennis, the USTA manages wheelchair tennis in the United States, including the sanctioning of tournaments, overseeing the ranking systems, creating and managing a High Performance program for developing elite disabled athletes and coaches. 

All athlete and staff nominations to the 2016 U.S. Olympic and Paralympic teams are subject to approval by the United States Olympic Committee.

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Cuevas Saves A Match Point, While Anderson – Johnson Match To Resume Friday

 

nottingham

From the LTA: (June 23, 2016)Top seed Kevin Anderson and fellow big-hitter Steve Johnson have been made to wait to decide who clinches the last remaining semi-final place at the Aegon Open Nottingham, after bad light forced the suspension of play on Thursday night with the players on serve at 6-7(6) 7-5 4-3.

Their match will resume at 12 noon on Friday, with the winner going on to face No. 7 seed Andreas Seppi later in the day to decide who plays in Saturday’s final at the Nottingham Tennis Centre.

Already through to the last four in the other half of the draw are eighth seed Gilles Muller and World No. 25 Pablo Cuevas, who has reached his first ATP World Tour semi-final on grass after beating Cypriot Marcos Baghdatis 6-4 4-6 7-6(8). The second seed Uruguayan saved one match point and came back from 4-0 down in the final set tie-break to prevail over last year’s Aegon Open semi-finalist after almost two and a half hours.

“I’m so happy to win today,” the 30-year-old said. “It was an amazing match. I’ve seen Marcos play a lot on this surface and he’s a big player. I’m happy to reach my first grass court semi-final at this level.”

Earlier in the day, World No. 41 Muller defeated fourth seed Alexandr Dolgopolov 6-3 6-4 to continue his fine form on grass, having reached the last eight at the Aegon Championships at the Queen’s Club last week and the final of ‘s-Hertogenbosch the week before.

Luxembourg’s Muller, 33, said: “Today was my best performance of the tournament. If you take aside the start of the second set when I got broken after playing a pretty bad game, the rest of the match was very solid. I didn’t give him many chances to break and I had plenty of chances to break, so overall, it was a good performance.

On his opponent in the last four, Muller added: “Pablo doesn’t like the grass too much but still he is a great player. He’s doing very well, he came back from a big injury two or three years ago, and has been in the top 50 since. It’s going to be a very tough match.”

Meanwhile, Seppi will be waiting to find out the identity of his semi-final opponent after the Italian beat Dudi Sela of Israel 5-7 6-4 6-4 after two hours and two minutes.

On his victory, which seals his place in an ATP World Tour semi-final for the first time in 2016, Seppi said: “It wasn’t easy, especially at the beginning. It was difficult to find the rhythm and there were a lot of mistakes. I think I improved as the match went on and we had some good rallies in the last couple of games. It’s good to win many of them, especially in the end.”

Elsewhere, 2015 Davis Cup squad member Dom Inglot is the last remaining Brit at the Aegon Open as he reached Saturday’s doubles final alongside Canadian Daniel Nestor, getting past Robert Lindstedt and Aisam-Ul-Haq Qureshi 7-6(4) 6-4.

AEGON OPEN NOTTINGHAM – NOTTINGHAM, GBR

€704,805

19-25 JUNE 2016

RESULTS – JUNE 23, 2016

Men’s
Singles – Quarterfinals

[2] P. Cuevas (URU) d [9] M. Baghdatis (CYP) 64 46 76(8)

[8] G. Muller (LUX) d [4] A. Dolgopolov (UKR) 63 64

[7] A. Seppi (ITA) d D. Sela (ISR) 57 64 64

Men’s
Doubles – Semifinals

[2] D. Inglot (GBR) / D. Nestor (CAN) d S. Gonzalez (MEX) / S. Lipsky (USA) 76(4) 64

Quarterfinals

[1] I. Dodig (CRO) / M. Melo (BRA) d R. Lindstedt (SWE) / A. Qureshi (PAK) 63 67(4) 10-5

ORDER OF PLAY – FRIDAY, JUNE 24, 2016

CENTRE COURT start 12:00 noon

[1] K. Anderson (RSA) vs [6] S. Johnson (USA) 67(6) 75 43

[8] G. Muller (LUX) vs [2] P. Cuevas (URU)

Not Before 2:00 pm

[1] K. Anderson (RSA) or [6] S. Johnson (USA) vs [7] A. Seppi (ITA)

[1] I. Dodig (CRO) / M. Melo (BRA) vs O. Marach (AUT) / F. Martin (FRA)

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Victoria Azarenka Withdraws From Wimbledon

316Azarenkalowfh-001

(June 23, 2016) Victoria Azarenka has withdrawn from Wimbledon due to a right knee injury. The 26 year-old Belarusian who is the world No. 6 has three titles this year including Indian Wells and Miami. The two-time Australian Open winner has not played since she retired from her first round match at the French Open with the same knee injury.

The Ladies’ Singles seeds have been revised:

Wimbledon revised Ladies seed list

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Jimmy Connors and Monica Seles to serve as presenters at International Tennis Hall of Fame Class of 2016 Induction

ithof

(June 22, 2016) NEWPORT, R.I.,  – Tennis legends Jimmy Connors and Monica Seles will return to the International Tennis Hall of Fame in Newport, Rhode Island this summer to serve as presenters at the Hall of Fame induction festivities.

The Class of 2016 Induction Ceremony will see the sport’s highest honor be presented to former world No. 1’s Marat Safin of Russia and Justine Henin of Belgium. In addition, Class of 2015 Hall of Famer Amelie Mauresmo will be honored during the ceremony. Mauresmo was unable to attend last year’s ceremony due to the birth of her child.

“It’s very fitting to have the great champions of the Class of 2016 be welcomed into the International Tennis Hall of Fame by two of our sport’s all-time greats, Jimmy Connors and Monica Seles. We’re looking forward to a fantastic Rolex Hall of Fame Enshrinement Weekend in Newport in July to celebrate Justine, Marat, and Amelie, and their remarkable accomplishments,” commented Todd Martin, CEO of the International Tennis Hall of Fame.

Along with the inductees, Connors and Seles headline a star-studded weekend in Newport for the festivities, with the induction ceremony set for July 16 and additional events throughout the weekend, including PowerShares Legends Newport, a one-day legends tournament featuring Safin back in action.

Connors, an eight-time major champion, will serve as the presenter for Safin at the ceremony. In the ceremony, the presenter traditionally introduces the inductee before they are officially inducted, providing a look back at their career accomplishments and contributions to the sport. Although they played in different eras, Connors and Safin, both fiery competitors, have long been admirers of each other’s tennis careers. Connors was inducted into the International Tennis Hall of Fame in 1998.

Seles, who was inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2009, will present Henin at the induction ceremony. Seles and Henin’s careers had some overlap with the two players meeting in competition seven times. Both players were bolstered by notable baseline games and fierce backhands, and the two legends also approached the sport with a mental toughness that made them nearly untouchable at times.

During the ceremony, Amelie Mauresmo will be presented by her longtime manager and friend Micky Lawler, who now serves as president of the WTA.

International Tennis Hall of Fame President Stan Smith, who was inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1987, will play an active role in the induction ceremony. Hall of Famers Rosie Casals, Vic Seixas, Owen Davidson, Butch Buchholz, Donald Dell, Peachy Kellmeyer, Charlie Pasarell, and Jane Brown Grimes, will all be in Newport for the event. Additional notable tennis guests joining the celebration will include former world No. 1 Dinara Safina, sister of Marat Safin; retired WTA player Jill Craybas, who is a Rhode Island native; and former ATP stars Vijay Armritraj and Jimmy Arias.

On Sunday, July 17, when the newly inducted Marat Safin will be back in action on the tennis court. Safin will be competing in PowerShares Legends Newport, a special one-day tournament featuring three matches and one eventual champion crowned among retired tennis greats. In addition to Safin, the event will feature Andy Roddick, James Blake, and Mark Philippoussis.
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Radwanska Advances as Konta Takes Down Kvitova in Eastbourne

Agniezska Radwanska

Agniezska Radwanska

 

(June 22, 2016) No. 1 seed Agnieszka Radwanska moved into the quarterfinals of the Eastbourne International with a 6-3, 6-3 win over Eugenie Bouchard on Wednesday.

The Polish woman was happy with her performance. “I think that was much better match than yesterday,” she said. “Well, I think good match from the beginning till the end.

“Couple of breaks on the way, but I think my serve was also the key in that match. Very happy I could come back in that second set in the end and winning in two sets.”

2009 champion, Caroline Wozniacki did not fare as well, beated by qualifier Monica Puig 4-6, 6-3, 6-4.

Wozniacki, trying to get back on track from a foot injury said “I mean, you don’t climb Mount Everest in one day.

“No, I played really well. I’m really happy with that. Yeah, the foot, the body’s feeling good. I’m pleased with that.”

“I served quite well for a while there, and then just for a couple of games in the end of the second set, yeah, I think I didn’t get the first serves in or she just went for the returns and it went in.

“But, you know, it’s the small margins today, really. To be honest, I think I played really well yesterday and I think I played even better today.

“So it’s a lot of positives to take with you. At the end of the day on grass sometimes it can be that little thing that can just make a difference.

“Yeah, I think I can just look up from here and just bring that confidence with me to Wimbledon and just hope for a good draw.”

“I thought I was in trouble quite a few times just when the match started getting very even,” Puig said. “She’s a great player and she makes you work for every single point, so it was really up to me to stay very focused in my game plan and what I wanted to accomplish out there in the court.

“All in all it was a really tight match. Like the score I think doesn’t really reflect just how tight it was. I’m just really happy I got through.”

Fifth seed Petra Kvitova lost to Britain’s Johanna Konta 5-7, 6-4, 6-0.

“There was a match in it definitely at the beginning, and I was happy with how I was able to carry but also create more momentum going into that third,” said Konta who lost the first set after having a 5-2 lead.

“Overall I thought the match was played at a very good level for both of us. I think it just, yeah, was about being able to string together a few more points. I thought I maybe may have done that a bit better than her today.”

AEGON INTERNATIONAL – EASTBOURNE, GREAT BRITAIN
$776,878
JUNE 19 – 25, 2016

RESULTS – JUNE 22, 2016
Women’s Singles – Third Round
[1] A. Radwanska (POL) d E. Bouchard (CAN) 63 63
[11] J. Konta (GBR) d [5] P. Kvitova (CZE) 57 64 60
[12] D. Cibulkova (SVK) d [Q] K. Bondarenko (UKR) 76(3) 63
K. Mladenovic (FRA) d A. Friedsam (GER) 64 76(4)
[Q] M. Puig (PUR) d C. Wozniacki (DEN) 46 63 64
E. Vesnina (RUS) d [Q] M. Brengle (USA) 76(2) 64

Women’s Doubles – Quarterfinals
D. Jurak (CRO) / A. Rodionova (AUS) d [1] M. Hingis (SUI) / S. Mirza (IND) 63 63
[2] H. Chan (TPE) / Y. Chan (TPE) d R. Atawo (USA) / A. Spears (USA) 46 62 10-8
[4] T. Babos (HUN) / Y. Shvedova (KAZ) d Y. Xu (CHN) / S. Zheng (CHN) 76(6) 63
First Round
[1] M. Hingis (SUI) / S. Mirza (IND) d [WC] L. Safarova (CZE) / S. Stosur (AUS) 61 26 10-4
[2] H. Chan (TPE) / Y. Chan (TPE) d S. Errani (ITA) / O. Kalashnikova (GEO) 62 62
[PR] A. Groenefeld (GER) / K. Peschke (CZE) d A. Klepac (SLO) / K. Srebotnik (SLO) 36 63 10-6
R. Atawo (USA) / A. Spears (USA) d [WC] N. Broady (GBR) / H. Watson (GBR) 75 00 Retired ( Left Abdominal Injury )

ORDER OF PLAY – THURSDAY, JUNE 23, 2016
CENTRE COURT start 11:00 am
K. Mladenovic (FRA) vs [Q] M. Puig (PUR)

Not Before 1:00 pm
[1] A. Radwanska (POL) vs [12] D. Cibulkova (SVK)
M. Doi (JPN) or [10] Ka. Pliskova (CZE) vs E. Vesnina (RUS)
[11] J. Konta (GBR) vs A. Petkovic (GER) or E. Makarova (RUS)
After suitable rest – [3] E. Makarova (RUS) / E. Vesnina (RUS) vs [PR] A. Groenefeld (GER) / K. Peschke (CZE)

COURT 1 start 11:30 am
M. Doi (JPN) vs [10] Ka. Pliskova (CZE) 26 34

Not Before 12:00 noon
A. Petkovic (GER) vs E. Makarova (RUS) 10

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Baghdatis Saves Two Match Points To Reach Nottingham Final Eight

Marcos  Baghdatis

Marcos Baghdatis

(June 22, 2016) Second seed Pablo Cuevas survived Great Britain’s Dan Evans 6-7(4), 7-6(5), 6-4 to set up a Aegon Open Nottingham quarterfinal against Cypriot Marcos Baghdatis, while top seed Kevin Anderson is also through to the last eight.

Baghdatis, a semifinalist at the Nottingham Tennis Centre last year, came from a set down and saved two match points before beating 2015 Aegon Open runner-up Sam Querrey 1-6, 7-6(8), 6-4.

Baghdatis, 31, said of his comeback win over Querrey: “I’m really happy I turned it around. I had a very bad first set with a lot of negative things going through my mind. I was feeling very tired and I thought it wasn’t my day out there.

“But I got a bit more positive and started playing better tennis. I’m very happy I found my mindset on court in the second and third sets. I think that’s a big step, and I’m happy that it happened today and not at Wimbledon.”

 

AEGON OPEN NOTTINGHAM – NOTTINGHAM, GBR
€704,805
19-25 JUNE 2016

RESULTS – JUNE 22, 2016
Men’s Singles – Third Round
[1] K. Anderson (RSA) d [14] F. Verdasco (ESP) 63 76(6)
[2] P. Cuevas (URU) d D. Evans (GBR) 67(4) 76(5) 64
[4] A. Dolgopolov (UKR) d [Q] F. Dancevic (CAN) 63 75
[9] M. Baghdatis (CYP) d [5] S. Querrey (USA) 16 76(8) 64
[6] S. Johnson (USA) d [11] V. Pospisil (CAN) 76(4) 76(1)
[7] A. Seppi (ITA) d A. Mannarino (FRA) 62 63
[8] G. Muller (LUX) d M. Youzhny (RUS) 67(4) 76(4) 63
D. Sela (ISR) d B. Becker (GER) 63 26 64

Men’s Doubles – Quarterfinals
[2] D. Inglot (GBR) / D. Nestor (CAN) d N. Monroe (USA) / A. Sitak (NZL) 64 76(6)
O. Marach (AUT) / F. Martin (FRA) d [3] T. Huey (PHI) / M. Mirnyi (BLR) 64 57 10-5
S. Gonzalez (MEX) / S. Lipsky (USA) d P. Cuevas (URU) / J. Sousa (POR) 63 67(9) 10-8
First Round
[1] I. Dodig (CRO) / M. Melo (BRA) d [WC] J. Marray (GBR) / A. Shamasdin (CAN) 63 62

ORDER OF PLAY – THURSDAY, JUNE 23, 2016


CENTRE COURT start 12:00 noon
[8] G. Muller (LUX) vs [4] A. Dolgopolov (UKR)
[9] M. Baghdatis (CYP) vs [2] P. Cuevas (URU)
D. Sela (ISR) vs [7] A. Seppi (ITA)
[1] K. Anderson (RSA) vs [6] S. Johnson (USA)

COURT 4 start 12:00 noon
[1] I. Dodig (CRO) / M. Melo (BRA) vs R. Lindstedt (SWE) / A. Qureshi (PAK)
S. Gonzalez (MEX) / S. Lipsky (USA) vs [2] D. Inglot (GBR) / D. Nestor (CAN)

COURT 2 start 11:00 am
LTA JUNIOR CHALLENGE TROPHY – S. Riffice (USA) vs R. Storrie (GBR)
LTA JUNIOR CHALLENGE TROPHY – J. Mcnally (USA) vs A. Gray (GBR)
LTA JUNIOR CHALLENGE TROPHY – U. Blanch (USA) vs R. Storrie (GBR)
LTA JUNIOR CHALLENGE TROPHY – J. Clarke (GBR) vs J. Mcnally (USA)

COURT 3 start 11:00 am
LTA JUNIOR CHALLENGE TROPHY – J. Wolf (USA) vs J. Clarke (GBR)
LTA JUNIOR CHALLENGE TROPHY – A. Canter (GBR) vs U. Blanch (USA)
LTA JUNIOR CHALLENGE TROPHY – A. Gray (GBR) vs J. Wolf (USA)
LTA JUNIOR CHALLENGE TROPHY – A. Canter (GBR) vs S. Riffice (USA)

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2016 Wimbledon Seeds Announced

Wimbledontrophies

(June 22, 2016) Wimbledon has announced the seeds for the tournament.

MEN

The seeds are the top 32 players on the Emirates ATP Ranking list, BUT then rearranged on a surface-based system. Since 2002 a seeding committee has not been required for the Gentlemen’s Singles following an agreement made with the ATP. The seeding order is determined using an objective and transparent system to reflect more accurately an individual player’s grass court achievements: The formula is:

  • Take the Emirates ATP Ranking points at 20 June 2016
  • Add 100% of the points earned for all grass court tournaments in the past 12 months
  • Add 75% of the points earned for the best grass court tournament in the 12 months before that

LADIES

The seeding order follows the WTA ranking list, except where in the opinion of the committee, a change is necessary to produce a balanced draw. This year, there have been no changes.

GENTLEMEN’S SINGLES

1 DJOKOVIC, Novak (SRB)

2 MURRAY, Andy (GBR)

3 FEDERER, Roger (SUI)

4 WAWRINKA, Stan (SUI)

5 NISHIKORI, Kei (JPN)

6 RAONIC, Milos (CAN)

7 GASQUET, Richard (FRA)

8 THIEM, Dominic (AUT)

9 CILIC, Marin (CRO)

10 BERDYCH, Tomas (CZE)

11 GOFFIN, David (BEL)

12 TSONGA, Jo-Wilfried (FRA)

13 FERRER, David (ESP)

14 BAUTISTA AGUT, Roberto (ESP)

15 KYRGIOS, Nick (AUS)

16 SIMON, Gilles (FRA)

17 MONFILS, Gael (FRA)

18 ISNER, John (USA)

19 TOMIC, Bernard (AUS)

20 ANDERSON, Kevin (RSA)

21 KOHLSCHREIBER, Philipp (GER)

22 LOPEZ, Feliciano (ESP)

23 KARLOVIC, Ivo (CRO)

24 ZVEREV, Alexander (GER)

25 TROICKI, Viktor (SRB)

26 PAIRE, Benoit (FRA)

27 SOCK, Jack (USA)

28 QUERREY, Sam (USA)

29 CUEVAS, Pablo (URU)

30 DOLGOPOLOV, Alexandr (UKR)

31 SOUSA, Joao (POR)

32 POUILLE, Lucas (FRA)

LADIES’ SINGLES

1 WILLIAMS, Serena (USA)

2 MUGURUZA, Garbine (ESP)

3 RADWANSKA, Agnieszka (POL)

4 KERBER, Angelique (GER)

5 HALEP, Simona (ROU)

6 AZARENKA, Victoria (BLR)

7 VINCI, Roberta (ITA)

8 BENCIC, Belinda (SUI)

9 WILLIAMS, Venus (USA)

10 KEYS, Madison (USA)

11 KVITOVA, Petra (CZE)

12 BACSINSZKY, Timea (SUI)

13 SUAREZ NAVARRO, Carla (ESP)

14 KUZNETSOVA, Svetlana (RUS)

15 STOSUR, Samantha (AUS)

16 PLISKOVA, Karolina (CZE)

17 KONTA, Johanna (GBR)

18 SVITOLINA, Elina (UKR)

19 STEPHENS, Sloane (USA)

20 CIBULKOVA, Dominika (SVK)

21 ERRANI, Sara (ITA)

22 PAVLYUCHENKOVA, Anastasia (RUS)

23 JANKOVIC, Jelena (SRB)

24 IVANOVIC, Ana (SRB)

25 STRYCOVA, Barbora (CZE)

26 BEGU, Irina-Camelia (ROU)

27 BERTENS, Kiki (NED)

28 VANDEWEGHE, Coco (USA)

29 SAFAROVA, Lucie (CZE)

30 KASATKINA, Daria (RUS)

31 GARCIA, Caroline (FRA)

32 MLADENOVIC, Kristina (FRA)


GENTLEMEN’S DOUBLES

1 HERBERT, Pierre-Hugues (FRA) / MAHUT, Nicolas (FRA)

2 BRYAN, Bob (USA) / BRYAN, Mike (USA)

3 MURRAY, Jamie (GBR) / SOARES, Bruno (BRA)

4 ROJER, Jean-Julien (NED) / TECAU, Horia (ROU)

5 DODIG, Ivan (CRO) / MELO, Marcelo (BRA)

6 BOPANNA, Rohan (IND) / MERGEA, Florin (ROU)

7 KUBOT, Lukasz (POL) / PEYA, Alexander (AUT)

8 POSPISIL, Vasek (CAN) / SOCK, Jack (USA)

9 INGLOT, Dominic (GBR) / NESTOR, Daniel (CAN)

10 KONTINEN, Henri (FIN) / PEERS, John (AUS)

11 KLAASEN, Raven (RSA) / RAM, Rajeev (USA)

12 HUEY, Treat (PHI) / MIRNYI, Max (BLR)

13 CABAL, Juan Sebastian (COL) / FARAH, Robert (COL)

14 STEPANEK, Radek (CZE) / ZIMONJIC, Nenad (SRB)

15 CUEVAS, Pablo (URU) / GRANOLLERS, Marcel (ESP)

16 PAVIC, Mate (CRO) / VENUS, Michael (NZL)

LADIES’ DOUBLES

1 HINGIS, Martina (SUI) / MIRZA, Sania (IND)

2 GARCIA, Caroline (FRA) / MLADENOVIC, Kristina (FRA)

3 CHAN, Hao-Ching (TPE) / CHAN, Yung-Jan (TPE)

4 MAKAROVA, Ekaterina (RUS) / VESNINA, Elena (RUS)

5 BABOS, Timea (HUN) / SHVEDOVA, Yaroslava (KAZ)

6 HLAVACKOVA, Andrea (CZE) / HRADECKA, Lucie (CZE)

7 MATTEK-SANDS, Bethanie (USA) / SAFAROVA, Lucie (CZE)

8 GOERGES, Julia (GER) / PLISKOVA, Karolina (CZE)

9 XU, Yifan (CHN) / ZHENG, Saisai (CHN)

10 ATAWO, Raquel (USA) / SPEARS, Abigail (USA)

11 KLEPAC, Andreja (SLO) / SREBOTNIK, Katarina (SLO)

12 GASPARYAN, Margarita (RUS) / NICULESCU, Monica (ROU)

13 KING, Vania (USA) / KUDRYAVTSEVA, Alla (RUS)

14 MEDINA GARRIGUES, Anabel (ESP) / PARRA SANTONJA, Arantxa (ESP)

15 ERRANI, Sara (ITA) / KALASHNIKOVA, Oksana (GEO)

16 BERTENS, Kiki (NED) / LARSSON, Johanna (SWE)

 

 

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Wimbledon Preview Conference Call with ESPN’s Chrissie Evert, John McEnroe

John McEnroe

John McEnroe

Wimbledon Preview Conference Call with ESPN’s Chrissie Evert, John McEnroe

 

(June 21, 2016) ESPN tennis analysts Chrissie Evert and John McEnroe spoke with media Tuesday to preview Wimbledon, which is exclusive to ESPN starting Monday, June 27.  Highlights of the call are followed by the full transcript.

 

Soundbites

On:  Are nerves the reason Serena is “stuck” on 21 Majors, one short of Graf?

  • I think it has gotten to her a little bit nerve-wise, no doubt about it. Especially against Kerber and against Muguruza, she wasn’t able to dig herself out of the hole like she has in past years, which was surprising to see that, because that’s what she is infamous for. When she’s down, she can get that next gear, that next level, play some great tennis. We didn’t see that in both those matches when she was in trouble. That tells me something is holding her back, and it could be nerves….(that said) In the last few years, she’s been good enough at 60%, 70% to win matches. Now I don’t think it’s going to win matches for her.  The competition has gotten better. They’re less intimidated by her. They have strategy when they go out against her. They’re just not intimidated. They know she’s human.” – Evert

 

On:  A quick look at the top men.

  • “Everyone is chasing Djokovic, there’s no question about it. Everybody else is trying to bridge the gap between Andy and see what else is out there. Rafa not playing, Roger has been struggling to stay healthy for the first time really. Losing to Thiem, Zverev, these guys can see light at the end of the tunnel maybe.  It’s going to be interesting this year, but clearly at the moment these guys have put themselves out here, Andy and Novak, and these other guys have to figure out ways to add to what they’ve got and to bridge this gap.” – McEnroe

On:  The Lendl-Murray Reunion.

  • I think Lendl did more for him than anybody. I think it’s a great combination because Lendl’s strengths are Murray’s weaknesses. Lendl, mentally and emotionally, he managed himself so well on the court. With Andy, that’s been sort of his downfall a little bit in the past, he’s gotten so emotional in these matches.  It was noticeably different when Lendl was coaching him. He was a bit quieter. He seemed to have himself under control a lot more.  I think it’s a great fit. I’m happy for both of them, that they’re working together. Again, that’s the best scenario for Andy Murray right now, to have him in his corner.” – Evert

On: Working with Raonic between the French Open and Wimbledon

  • He’s a great young kid, extremely professional and dedicated.  (My role is to) Try to hopefully help him a bit. I think he’s one of the contenders….. (he) has a big game, obviously got a lot of shots. One of the best serves in the history of tennis. He has a huge forehand.  I think he understands that he needs to be able to use that to his advantage, be more aggressive, take it to people.” – McEnroe
  1. I’d like to talk about Serena. Talk us through, how much do you think this chase for 22 has gotten to Serena, if at all? We saw her stall a little bit for 18 a couple years ago. I just wonder if there’s any correlation to be made, or Serena has put this to the side and trying to do what she always does, which is win the tournament?
    CHRISSIE EVERT: I think it has gotten to her a little bit nerve-wise, no doubt about it. Especially against Kerber and against Muguruza, she wasn’t able to dig herself out of the hole like she has in past years, which was surprising to see that, because that’s what she is infamous for. When she’s down, she can get that next gear, that next level, play some great tennis. We didn’t see that in both those matches when she was in trouble. That tells me something is holding her back, and it could be nerves.

    Saying that, I’ve always said, John can weigh in on this, too, after 30 years old, when you’ve been on the tour for 15, in her case maybe 20 years, you don’t have 100% on days every single match. That’s what she’s experiencing now, in the last few years. In the last few years, she’s been good enough at 60%, 70% to win matches. Now I don’t think it’s going to win matches for her.  The competition has gotten better. They’re less intimidated by her. They have strategy when they go out against her. They’re just not intimidated. They know she’s human. They’ve seen a couple bad losses, a couple nerve-struck losses. There’s a couple different ingredients.  In saying that, Wimbledon is the perfect time for her. I think the surface is tailor made for her game. Power and athleticism, John has said this, is the key to playing on grass.  If she can just focus with each match, her game, she can just play it out, and her game is still the best on grass as any of the other women right now.
    JOHN McENROE: The only thing I would add is obviously for quite a few years it’s been hers to win or lose. Going for the slam, obviously it’s done so rarely, the pressure is amped up that much more. She was trying to tie Steffi. When she lost at the Open, there was a big letdown. She didn’t play much at all. I don’t think she played for three, four months.  She almost pulled out of the Australian. I was extremely surprised, as well as most people, that she lost that. Not as surprised at the French, the way Muguruza was playing.  It’s not easy to try to do what she’s doing, to make history at this stage. Knowing that motivation is an issue at times between the majors has made it a little trickier probably.  There’s not that many people that wouldn’t pick her here. So it is a surface, if she’s playing well, she’ll win the tournament. But I think, as Chrissie said, there’s more days when you’re not playing that well, and that’s where she can get in trouble.

    Q. CoCo Vandeweghe has been playing pretty well on the grass. She reached the quarterfinals last year. Chrissie, how do you see her doing this year? Do you see her reaching the second week and possibly going further than her quarterfinals last year? On the men’s side, for John, del Potro is back after a two-year absence. After seeing him play a couple matches this year, how do you expect him to do at Wimbledon?
    CHRISSIE EVERT: Well, we’re seeing some of her best tennis. Again, I have to say that a lot of it’s because of the surface, grass. As I said before, athleticism and power have a lot to do with her success.  Again, her game is tailor made for the grass also. She doesn’t like the clay. She doesn’t have a lot of patience. She doesn’t like to move a lot. I think the grass accentuates the strengths in her game, which are the big first serve and the fact she can volley. She likes to come into the net and volley.  Craig Kardon I think has done a great job with her.

    You know, it depends on the draw really. It really depends on the draw. When you say, Can anybody make the second week? The draw, the weather conditions…  She’s capable very much. I think the last few tournaments will give her confidence. But, you know, she’s still building I think on the emotional and the mental part of the game, not getting down on herself. She’s such a perfectionist, I think that area can still improve.  Again, this surface is easier on her, shorter rallies, she doesn’t have to stay out there and be patient. She can hit that winner on the third or fourth shot. It just depends on if it’s working that day, she can beat almost anyone. But we’ve seen her with a slew of errors, too.  She’s still an unpredictable player. If she’s going to have any success, it’s going to be on the grass.
    JOHN McENROE: I like Juan a lot, but I’m believing he’s not totally sure of himself with his wrist. I talked to him recently. He says he’s getting better. Hopefully he is. I’m taking his word for it. The guy was 5 in the world at one stage. He battled back to the top 10. He can obviously still play.  He’s got to be able to not just slice his backhand. Obviously even at Queen’s and the week before, I forgot where he was the week before that, Stuttgart or something, he does predominantly do that. So it’s sort of a work in progress.  I think hopefully he’ll get healthy. That’s what it boils down to. He still has got game. He’s had a rough patch. I hope he gets it together. He’s on a protected ranking. He has some opportunities. He’s protected ranking 7, but he doesn’t get seeded. That means he could play anyone in the draw, which wouldn’t be the best thing for some of the top players, but it’s not the best for him either to try to get back to where he sort of deserves to be if he can stay healthy.
    Q. How did he seem to you when you spoke to him?
    JOHN McENROE: He’s obviously been extremely frustrated and upset. He’s been out of the game way too long. He was at 5 in the world, got hurt, then he battled back to the top 10. I think he was 6 or 7 when he got hurt again. 7, that’s his protected ranking. It’s a shame, in a way.  So, you know, I’m reading between the lines. I’m sure he’s still scared, a little worried. I don’t know. He’s tried all different types of surgeries and things. I didn’t get into the exact specifics.  Just as someone who hates to see someone lose a career over getting hurt, it’s sort of unfair when you see good guys get burned by injury. If he does get healthy, I don’t know if he’ll get all the way back to 5 in the world, but he can still do some damage.

    Q. Serena, in the last three slams, she’s lost to first-time slam winners. I wanted to sort of revisit, Chrissie, what you were saying before that to the rest of the field maybe she doesn’t seem invincible anymore. Players are beating her in big matches, and they’re players who have not won a slam before. I also wanted to ask about Andy Murray. He’s right there at all these slams. He won three years ago. How do you see his chance against Novak, if it were to come down to those two?
    CHRISSIE EVERT: As far as Serena, I’ll reiterate, from my observations when I’m calling her matches, I’m seeing these finals, again, it’s twofold. What I’m seeing is the fact that she hasn’t been able to, the last three Grand Slams, get herself into that next gear when she’s in trouble. This is what she’s been famous for in her whole career, especially last year when she was in like, what, nine three-set matches in Grand Slams. It was just incredible to me to see her down a set and a break against an Azarenka, down a set against Safarova, Bacsinszky, and come back. She was able to find that gear and that level. We haven’t seen that.

    But the other thing, maybe even more important than what we’re seeing now, is the belief we’re seeing from other players. That’s what Kerber talked about, that’s what Muguruza talked about. They are starting to believe they can beat Serena. We’ve never seen that in Serena’s career when she’s been dominant. There’s always been a little bit of resistance or a little bit of doubt, and they haven’t been able to play their game aggressively on the big points in the third set, and Serena has been able to.  It’s twofold: it’s Serena and it’s the field having that belief. Again, Kerber, Muguruza have talked about that belief. I think more and more players are finding that belief as Serena loses more and more, she becomes less and less untouchable.  In saying that, it sounds like a negative for Serena. But for her to even be in this position is historical. I believe, along I’m sure with John and other champions, that she still can get that one, which would tie her with Steffi. To me, this is her best shot.

    One thing I didn’t bring up is she did have a big week with Mackie Shilstone last week in Palm Beach. She did go over a lot of fitness. She hasn’t had Mackie really on her team until I believe last year, in the summer of last year. Hopefully that was a green flag saying, I want to go that extra mile, get in better shape for Wimbledon, come visit me. He did work with her. In saying that, that’s a good sign for her.

    Q. John, if you want to talk about Murray?
    JOHN McENROE: I got a firsthand look because I’ve been working with Milos. He was playing great. Andy stepped it up. Like Milos is trying to do with him, he’s trying to do with Novak, bridge that gap a little bit, try to figure out what little bit extra he can do. He’s obviously put himself in position numerous times.

    Novak went into the zone at the French. Andy was playing the best tennis of his life on clay for sure at the French and won the first set, looked great. In ways he’s getting closer. I do think his best chance, if you were to say in terms of surface, I think he’s best suited, just having the crowd more on his side here at Wimbledon. So I think his best chance, not that he can’t beat him at the Open, he beat him in Rome not long ago, but his record has recently not been good.  Novak has handled it tremendously, what he’s been able to do, like Serena. He’s won four in a row. He’s trying to do something that only one or two other people have done. He’s unbelievably consistent and prepared.  I think him adding Ivan, he’s trying to get that little bit extra, just like other players are trying to do the same. We’ll see how it all plays out.  Murray is playing great. He’s a great player, there’s no question about it. But at the moment there’s no question that the level that Novak is at is something that you rarely, if ever, see, that consistency. He’s impenetrable in a way. He’s able to play good offense. It’s a tall order for anyone.
    CHRISSIE EVERT: With Lendl back on the team, I think that’s all a positive. I think that’s going to give also him maybe a little bit more excitement. I think Ivan was so good for him mentally and emotionally more than anything. We maybe have seen a little bit more focus. I just think that’s going to be great.  I agree with John. With him playing at Wimbledon, his home crowd, him playing some of the best tennis of his life, playing more aggressively, and with Lendl back, I think it’s all looking good. It’s about as good as it’s going to get, let’s put it that way. If that’s good enough to win the tournament, so be it. But is that enough? That’s the big question. Djokovic is just playing so great.

    Q. John, sticking with Lendl, what are your thoughts on Murray’s reappointment of him? Do you think he can add that missing ingredient to that rivalry with Djokovic? How much would you enjoy a reunion with him at Wimbledon?
    JOHN McENROE: I just saw him the other day. Milos had a great shot at a set and 3-Love, playing really well. You have to credit him. He seized an opportunity and stepped up. That’s what great players do.  As Milos is trying to do, not just him but others, leave no stone unturned, try to maximize what they have. To me it’s not surprising. It’s not a no-brainer. But I think the fact that his best success was with Ivan, it makes sense to give this another shot given the circumstances.  It doesn’t surprise me. I think it makes people think if you get in someone’s head in any way, whether that can make a difference, whether he makes a difference. We all hope he can make any difference. He’s done an excellent job in the past.

    Everyone is chasing Djokovic, there’s no question about it. Everybody else is trying to bridge the gap between Andy and see what else is out there. Rafa not playing, Roger has been struggling to stay healthy for the first time really. Losing to Thiem, Zverev, these guys can see light at the end of the tunnel maybe.  It’s going to be interesting this year, but clearly at the moment these guys have put themselves out here, Andy and Novak, and these other guys have to figure out ways to add to what they’ve got and to bridge this gap.

    Q. Chrissie, we saw today that Mouratoglou thought it was strange that Murray hired Mauresmo. Do you think we’ll see a top player hire a female coach in the future?
    CHRISSIE EVERT: Who said that? I didn’t hear the first part of that.
    Q. Patrick Mouratoglou said it was strange for Murray to hire a woman as a coach.
    CHRISSIE EVERT: Wow!
    Q. He said it’s strange because they don’t know the men’s game as well as the women’s game.
    CHRISSIE EVERT: Yeah, I disagree with that. Billie Jean was a coach. I think she coached Todd Martin. Both of those players are serve and volleyers, played an aggressive game. I’m sure Mauresmo did a lot of homework. That’s kind of a little bit of a sexist statement.

    In saying that, I think Lendl did more for him than anybody. I think it’s a great combination because Lendl’s strengths are Murray’s weaknesses. Lendl, mentally and emotionally, he managed himself so well on the court. With Andy, that’s been sort of his downfall a little bit in the past, he’s gotten so emotional in these matches.  It was noticeably different when Lendl was coaching him. He was a bit quieter. He seemed to have himself under control a lot more.  I think it’s a great fit. I’m happy for both of them, that they’re working together. Again, that’s the best scenario for Andy Murray right now, to have him in his corner.

    Q. Every now and again there’s the subject of whether the men should go back and maybe play best-of-three sets in the early rounds at Grand Slams. John, I don’t know if you remember, but when you first started playing the US Open in ’77 onwards, the first rounds were played over three sets.
    JOHN McENROE: My memory is not that bad (laughter).
    Q. You’re one of the few that can remember it. Can you remember what the reason was behind it, what you thought of it, and what you think of the principle in general?
    JOHN McENROE: Well, the principle in general to me is that the players are so well-prepared, a lot of them, but especially the top players, with their teams, et cetera, I believe they’re more difficult because there’s such a premium on fitness.  Why don’t you see teenagers win? The breakthrough is harder physically and mentally. You don’t see the success as early. You have to sort of work your way up to that astronomical level of fitness in a way.  These guys to me prefer, even though there’s a stress obviously to playing best-of-five, especially if there’s delays, rain, if you had to do it a couple days in a row, they’re much more difficult to beat in best-of-five than best-of-three.  I would guess that the top players would shy against that, even though I think there’s an argument for it. We used to have 16 seeds and they did it. 32 seeds, you could think to yourself, I’m better than the 33rd player on. So you should be able to handle those people as well.  I think tennis should always think of ways to improve itself. I don’t think the door should be closed on saying that women would never play best-of-five or guys will never play best-of-three. I think it’s something that’s an ongoing discussion.

    I played tennis. Chrissie played for many years. Now we’re doing commentary. You sort of see it from both sides. You can see where the length of the match can be a problem because people’s attention span is much less than what it used to be. I’ve always wondered why at the very least there’s not tiebreakers in the fifth set in majors so there’s at least light at the end of the tunnel for the fans watching on TV or there, or the players.  But these are issues that need to be constantly addressed. The door shouldn’t be closed on that.  If I was coaching Djokovic, and I’m coaching Milos, part of his team right now, I’m not so sure I’d want them to switch it to best-of-three because I think the top guys are tougher to beat, like I said. These guys are extremely well-prepared.

    Q. Can you remember why they tried it in the first place?
    JOHN McENROE: It’s not going to change anytime soon.  I don’t remember why because even I, who was not known for my incredible fitness, I would like to think I was a reasonably fit person, but not quite as fit as these guys, I think it’s a little bit more of a roll of the dice. I did lose in the Round of 16 in the US Open in 1977, my first Open, 6-2, 6-3. It seemed like it happened too fast.  I don’t remember why it was changed other than perhaps the top players decided it would lessen their chances of a loss.

    Q. Do you think Novak Djokovic’s recent accomplishments have not been appreciated the way they should be, not getting as much press as a Roger Federer or somebody else, winning four in a row?
    JOHN McENROE: He’s a better player than I was, but I had a little bit of this because I was trying to break in with Connors and Borg, the top two guys. It was frustrating at times where you felt like people would gravitate or be behind these guys, and you were trying to get that same respect, not only from the players, but the press and fans.  Jimmy brought a lot to the table with his effort, Bjorn had this great aura and look. Roger is the most beautiful player I’ve ever watched. He’s like Baryshnikov. Rafa plays like an updated 21st century Connors, with that intensity, that point is the last point they are ever going to play.  I think people are starting to respect him more and more, to see the astronomical level of consistency he’s had, incredible success week in and week out. At the majors, if you look at his records, he’s approaching Roger’s records, which would seem insurmountable. 20 straight quarters, so many semis in a row. It’s amazing.  People are starting to understand and appreciate him more. He certainly had some of that. Also our sport is bigger where I am now in Europe than it is in the States. Obviously if we had more Americans like we used to with Chrissie and Connors, myself, other people, Pete and Andre, you go down the list, it would be helpful to the interests of our sport obviously if we had Americans.

    We have Serena in the women, but we don’t have that person in the men right now. That’s also an issue. That’s another part of the reason why I think he’s not appreciated as much as he could be.
    CHRISSIE EVERT: I think that Djokovic, like John said, came along in an era where you have two of the most beloved players, two of the most exciting players with a lot of flair in Nadal and in Federer. Nadal and Federer are so different, they had so many classic matches, I think there’s just an aura around their rivalry.  Then Novak came in, no drama, not a lot of flair, just the most dependable and most consistent and efficient player there was. As we see now, this guy quietly could just beat everybody as far as Grand Slam wins. He could just be the greatest of all time if he continues to go at the speed that he’s going.  He’s doing it in a quiet way. Again, there’s no controversy. There’s no drama. You always had that with Federer and with Nadal.  Then you look at Andy Murray. Andy kind of gets lost in the shuffle also because Andy is in an era with three of the greatest players of all time. Andy himself, if he was in any other era, he probably could have been ranked No. 1.  It’s a really exciting time I think for men’s tennis.

    Q. Chrissie, do you see something in Muguruza that could potentially separate her from the pack, where she could become the primary rival for Serena?
    CHRISSIE EVERT: Sure. I mean, I don’t think you say no. I mean, who is going to be next, the next No. 1 player, after Serena is gone? You’ve got to put your money on Muguruza because first of all, you have to have power in today’s game. When I look at the next three, I look at Radwanska, Kerber and Halep. I don’t think either of those three are going to end up No. 1 in the world. They don’t have that sort of overwhelming power. Muguruza does have it, very much like Serena, following in her footsteps.  Muguruza, she still has to mature a little bit. She’s still young. She still has to get probably a little more consistent with her results in the smaller tournaments. But when I look at winning Grand Slams, you’d have to say Muguruza, you’d have to look at Madison Keys, Azarenka, Kvitova, the power players more now more so than the consistent counter-punchers.  Yeah, she’s come a long way. I think she’s going to have a tough Wimbledon. It’s very hard to carry that momentum. Very few people have won the French and Wimbledon back to back, especially at that young of an age. That will be a real curiosity for me if she can carry that momentum and confidence and do well, think about last year reaching the finals, or is she going to have a hard time resetting, especially in dealing with people’s expectations.

    Q. John, you had that Wimbledon run late in your career when you lost to Agassi. Could you relate that to Roger Federer now? What do you see for Federer at this Wimbledon and beyond? Also the movie about you, did you have any input into that, and did you have any thought about the casting for you? And Chrissie, what about Madison Keys and Sloane? What do you expect from them from this tournament and on? What are they capable of achieving here and the rest of this year?
    JOHN McENROE: As far as the movie goes, at this particular point, I’ve had no input. I know they’ve reached out to both my and Bjorn’s agents. Had absolutely no involvement whatsoever in the casting. That’s simple facts. I’ve obviously heard of him, he seems a bit crazy, which may be a good thing. He’s done some good stuff, but I’m not that familiar with him as far as his whole career. That remains to be seen. You never know what could or could not happen.

    As far as your boy Roger Federer, I don’t know. I saw him play the last two events on TV. Clearly he’s trying to position himself here. His best shot, if he’s ever going to do it, would be here. Most people feel that way. Maybe Roger does at this point.  I don’t know exactly where he’s at physically. I mean, to me I think he has a far better chance than I did at that time, I would say, because he’s putting more into it, he’s leaving no stone unturned. He has people around him more so than I did. So I would say from that standpoint, if he were able to, with a little bit of luck, he could go a long way because he’s so comfortable on this surface.  I don’t know exactly his fitness. He’s been struggling to be on a court. In the best-of-five, that’s a different story. He hasn’t played a best-of-five set match for a while. That’s another issue. Other factors will come into it, like the draw, who he plays. All these things come into it.  It’s a little unpredictable. But after the string he had of 65 straight, missing the French, I think you start to say, Okay, how much longer are you going to see Roger around? You have to appreciate each time you see him at a major. He is going to be 35 in August, I believe.
    CHRISSIE EVERT: As far as Madison and Sloane, they definitely are the most talented young Americans that we have. If I take one at a time…Sloane has disappointed us. Our expectations have been higher of Sloane. I think she’s disappointed us in her attitude, if anything. She seems like in the past she hasn’t been as engaged in her matches. She’s received criticism from that.  Tremendous talent. She can do everything. I just think it’s a matter of her putting herself on the line. If she can put herself out there and play aggressively like she knows how to play from the first shot, I think she’s a totally different player. She just in the past has been waiting and kind of assessing her opponent, kind of playing counter-punch tennis. That’s not her game. Her strength is from the first shot stepping in and playing aggressively. If she can do that, she’s hungry to win, she wants to commit herself, I think she definitely could be a top contender.  By the way, she looks better. She’s getting better and better. But maybe she’s going at her own pace. Maybe we’re all trying to rush her.

 

I know we all tried to rush Madison Keys. I’ve known Madison since she was 10 years old. Now I’ve come to the conclusion that in her own time she will win a Grand Slam, but it has to be on her terms. She has to make all the decisions.  I think we’ve seen some signs from her winning Birmingham. We saw it last year when she won Eastbourne. This girl can play on grass. This girl, again, her serve I think matches Serena’s. I think it’s the only serve out there that matches Serena’s as far as power and being a threat, being unreturnable. I’ve always had a lot of confidence in Madison.  I think in her own time, the physical has always been advanced for her, her game, her power. Once the mental and emotional catch up, which I see signs of right now, I think she’s going to win some majors. I don’t have any doubt in my mind.

Q. John, I wondered how much you enjoyed your week at Queen’s and if it’s given you extra appetite for doing more the rest of the year and further ahead? Chrissie, doing a series on great shots of the game, Serena’s serve is obviously very big. Is there anything you could sort of add to that that’s not obvious to the layperson that goes into the production of it?
CHRISSIE EVERT: How was your week, John?
JOHN McENROE: My week was nice. Thank you for asking (laughter).

Actually, I stayed in Europe and went straight over to London from Paris. It was good to sort of spend a week, get a feel for what makes Milos tick. He’s a great young kid, extremely professional and dedicated. (My role is to) Try to hopefully help him a bit. I think he’s one of the contenders. If you told me four months ago there would be six, seven people that could possibly win this, there’s a lot of guys that can beat guys on a given day, but to actually win it, I would put him in the handful of half dozen guys. I think it’s nice from that standpoint to be part of his team.

As far as down the road, I think it always was for me hopefully something that wasn’t going to be for a couple weeks then, “Thank you very much.” Hopefully for him, and it ultimately is up to him, that he’ll be a better player in a year or two years than he is at this moment, even though I think he has a shot at winning it this year.  Obviously from 25 to 29, the next three, four years, I think it’s an opportunity for him to improve. I think he wants to do that. It’s great when you see someone that’s really working hard at maximizing what he’s got.  He’s had a good team around him before. Carlos Moya has done a real fine job when he’s been there. He has other people. Ricardo Piatti has been coaching him as more of a regular thing. I think it would be part of something where I pick and choose. The beauty that’s happened for me the last five years or so with some of the other players like Boris, Ivan was doing it more often, I don’t know how many weeks he’s going to do with Andy now, but if I use the word ‘part-time’, somewhere 10 weeks or less, that’s something that is much more in my wheelhouse, and perhaps it’s for Milos as well because he already has a good team around him.  This is the type of thing where it first started to feel like, Okay, if something nice came along, it’s good. It’s not a 30- or 40-week commitment like a lot of players have with a lot of their coaches.
CHRISSIE EVERT: About John and Raonic, very much like Lendl and Murray, I think Lendl’s philosophy and his strengths really helped Murray. When I look at John’s game, it’s like opposites attract. I think John has so many rare insights into playing grass court tennis, because he played so well.  I think John was known for his touch and his quickness around the court, coming into the net. If John can influence Raonic on any of these things, I think it would be a plus-plus with Milos. When you got with him, I liked it, I liked that combination right away. You can light a fire under him because you are a feisty player.  He’s very much in control out there. Like you said, he’s professional, he’s hard-working. But he needs a little fire and he needs to show. I think just a few little tweaks in his game would make all the difference in the world in him winning Wimbledon. I’m a big fan of that combination.

I’m not kissing your ass either, John.
JOHN McENROE: I appreciate that. Thank you.
CHRISSIE EVERT: I think Serena loads up really well from her leg strength. She uses her leg strength. She loads up well. She springs up, and that just gives her much more acceleration. That plus the racquet head speed is what gives her the power. So it’s that leg strength that probably we don’t talk about as much.  And the toss, it’s always in the same slot. She very rarely has a bad toss. It’s in that same slot where she can go wide or down the T, it’s unreadable.

Q. John, Milos came to the net very well in the beginning of the year at Australia, but there seemed to be differences at Queen’s with the forehand volley. Have you worked on the technical side with him in recent weeks, and if so, could you give some specifics, what your assessment was of him during the matches in Queen’s. And also, you don’t strike me as the kind of guy that is going to have a lot of fun sitting in the chair for three sets or even five. I was wondering how you were handling not having any ability to affect what’s going on on the court as opposed to sitting in the booth where you don’t necessarily have a vested interest in the outcome?
JOHN McENROE: I’m not the guy that can sit still very well in any situation. Certainly when you obviously have lost control, you try to add what you can, try to be helpful to someone before. I’d like to maybe do a lot of standing up than sitting down. Gets your body too stiff from sitting. I’m an energy person. I kind of hope that he can feed off some of my energy and intensity a little bit because that’s the way I am and that’s the way I’m going to be.  Ivan sat there for years and didn’t change his expression. It is certainly a more helpless position, and it’s easy to be the backseat driver: You should have done this, this is how you should do that. You have to be cognizant, or the fact I played for so long, and still try to play, I understand how difficult it is to actually go out there and execute.

As far as the first part of your question, I’m not going to get into the specifics of what we’re doing. I think that Milos is someone that has a big game, obviously got a lot of shots. One of the best serves in the history of tennis. He has a huge forehand.  I think he understands that he needs to be able to use that to his advantage, be more aggressive, take it to people. Exactly what he was doing in Australia, that’s the best I’ve ever seen Milos look, when he was playing down there. That’s sort of the game plan. With or without me that would be, I believe, something that he understands.

You always try to help someone with every part of the game. Just because I’m more of a touch player and have a better volley doesn’t mean that I’m never going to mention about his groundstrokes or serve or whatever. It depends. But obviously an important part of grass court play is to be aware of situations, court positioning. Volleying used to be more important, but I still think it can be important.  I think when you have a guy who is 6’5″ tall, he’s very imposing. If you ever heard me commentate, that’s a bit of a no-brainer. So hopefully he goes out there and is able to perform at the best of his ability and enjoy it. I would take pleasure in that if I could help him in that way.

Q. I noticed last week he was smiling a crazy amount on the court. I wondered if you had anything to do with that at all. He’s usually either stoic or ticked off.
JOHN McENROE: I can’t answer that. You’d probably have to speak to him.  Before I even started working with Milos, I knew him around. I have some people in New York, know people he’s friends with. To me, because I personally wasn’t able to get out on the court and enjoy it maybe at the end of the day as much as I would have liked, yeah, I play with intensity, but sometimes it was negative intensity which sometimes gets a little old. I think if there was one aspect of Roger Federer’s career that I’m jealous of is that it seemed like he really loved being out there, whereas people like myself or Sampras, most people really, are filled with angst, because it is intense and you don’t want to let down and all these other reasons you’re sort of brought up to believe is the case.  Obviously Milos has felt the best way for him to perform is to sort of keep an even keel and not show much emotion, go about it. I don’t think he hired me so I would say, Look, keep exactly the same way. I believe he’ll be a better player when he’s able to express himself more positively.  Murray, you watch Murray, Andy starts screaming at his box, whatever. People prefer he didn’t do that. It could cost him at times, maybe when he played Djokovic, not a lot of guys but a couple guys.  Maybe where Milos would be able to enjoy this. This is tough to do, but there’s great rewards. It is a little bit like, Look, trust me, I’ve been there, I didn’t do as good a job, and hopefully you can have more fun with this and enjoy it.  I believe he can. It’s not something where suddenly you’re going to start acting like Rafael Nadal. Over time, if you look at Novak, I think he’s done a great job of turning lemons into lemonade, things that were going on in the court in the past. Now he uses the crowd better, gets into it. He recognizes the situation, takes advantage of it. That’s a great quality he’s got now. I’d like to see Milos do that, as well.
CHRISSIE EVERT: That’s one thing that Serena is lacking right now, is maybe she should be enjoying the journey and the process a little bit more. She certainly doesn’t appear to be happy all the time on the court.

THE MODERATOR: Chrissie, you have to go, but we’ll take a few more for John on the line. I thank you for your contributions today.
CHRISSIE EVERT: Thank you. Bye, John. See you next week.
JOHN McENROE: Bye, Chrissie.

Q. John, there was an article that Pete Sampras did a while back. It was in the form of a letter to himself as a young player where he reflected on emerging into the game, giving himself a few tips. If you could go back, give yourself a tip or two when you were emerging, what would that be?
JOHN McENROE: Well, it would be to act more like Connors in the sense that he’d lose it and freak out, but he’d have his arm around someone, loving every minute of it, embracing, laughing it off, not thinking if you laughed, you’d lose your intensity. Or make a joke. Sometimes I thought things would be humorous if I said it, I didn’t say it, I said almost the opposite. So just enjoying it on the court more, which is easier said than done.  Certainly the way I played, I was sort of brought up to be really intense, not let down. If you let down, you lose it. God forbid, if you enjoyed it, had fun, your game would drop.  If I had let myself let that happen, I feel like I would have enjoyed it even more, even though when I look back I feel pretty lucky and fortunate. It’s at the time when I was competing to win these majors, perhaps I would have been able to enjoy it more in the later part of my career.

Q. Jimmy was your great rival. He interacted with the crowd, getting the crowd behind him. Did that piss you off? Also, has anyone since Jimmy approached that, had that skill set?
JOHN McENROE: It pissed me off, but I also respected it. I was like, Wow, this guy is like a maestro out here, he can do this. It drove me crazy, but I wish I had done it more myself, so… That’s as simple as that.  I don’t think there’s someone that I’ve ever seen that has controlled the crowd as well as Jimmy Connors, as far as I can see. The game is different now. The challenge system has changed. It’s better for the player. You feel like you’re going to get a second look. That’s comforting.

I think Nadal has played with the type of intensity and exuberance in a way. He didn’t get with the crowd, but he’s just so fired up, like every point is his last point, pump the fist, jump up, being down two sets to love even. He’d hold serve, he’d be screaming. I really respected that, especially a little bit earlier. When you see it a little more often, it’s tougher to do when you’re not winning as much. Even now you see him, even meaningless it’s considered, he still gets fired up.

I don’t think there’s ever going to be someone that lit it up. Kyrgios, he does things where he drives everybody crazy, but he does things where he’s magical in a way. If he actually ever puts a potpourri of things together in a way that it’s going to be difficult to do, because he’s going to need the right people, understand what this is all about, the commitment, all this other stuff. He’s got the type of personality where he could light things up, drive players crazy because of his skill, but also because his ability to sort of interact. He’s doing that when Milos is playing. He’s talking to everybody, always talking, drives you nuts. Some of it can be funny, what he said, some of it can be annoying, some of it can be complimentary. He always seems to be doing something.  You have different sides of the spectrum. But he’s someone that could potentially bring a lot to the table.

Q. John, your thoughts on Eugenie Bouchard’s game heading into Wimbledon? Have you been watching her closely enough to comment?
JOHN McENROE: You know, I haven’t seen her play enough to say for sure. I think because of the unpredictability of grass, in terms of how little people play on it, it would make things more open.  I haven’t seen anything, me personally, from the dozen or so times I’ve seen her play since she had these monumental struggles that would say, Okay, I’m ready to see her break through and make this huge move.  The fact she had a year where she was at the end of majors consistently would lead me to believe that if the right set of circumstances took place, the confidence could start building again.  I don’t see much confidence right now at all. But she’s out there. I think she’s back with Saviano. It’s sort of in a sense what Murray is doing. She clearly had this great one year where it was way better than anything she’s ever done.  It’s a work in progress. To me, I don’t see the confidence right now that would lead me to believe it’s going to be much of a run. Stranger things have happened.

Q. Your relationship with Milos, is it all business or have you become friends with him? What kind of guy is he?
JOHN McENROE: I think Milos is a really class act. I think he’s extremely smart. He’s a guy I knew a little bit from before. I was supportive, because I always try to be supportive of the young guys coming up. I saw something obviously with his serve where you’re like, Oh, my God, this guy has one of the greatest serves in the history of tennis. He’s a respectful guy. He’s very professional and dedicated. I want him to enjoy this more.  So I’d be supportive whether I was working with him or not. I have been because I know some people that are around him, kids of parents that I’m friends with, he’s younger than some of my kids. He has got a place in New York. I’ve seen him a few times not at the US Open or something.  I’m probably a little bit too old that, like, we’re buddies. But any part of a professional relationship, at least for me, you try to figure out what he’s about, what makes him tick. You sort of try to fit in because this is something he’s been doing for a long time, and I’m not going to walk in and go, Now you do it this way.  We had a good week of practice before Queen’s. He played well at Queen’s. He was up a set and 3-Love against Murray. He missed a backhand volley, a challenge, missed by a quarter of an inch to be at 4-1. He was unlucky not to win that game. He should have won the match in straight sets. But he didn’t.

Now we have to get him focused for Wimbledon, obviously which matters quite a bit more. I think hopefully he’s one of the half dozen guys that can win it. He has a good team around him. Carlos Moya I think has done an excellent job. I said earlier in this call, it’s the best I’ve ever seen Milos play, at the Australian, get him back to where he’s a presence, an intimidating one. He’s getting there. Hopefully Carlos will be back here and I’ll be doing commentating mainly. Hopefully I’ll be able to get a chance to be out there and support him. But my professional commitments with ESPN in doing Wimbledon, and some BBC, mainly ESPN, will preclude me from doing too much with Milos. But that was understood before.  Whatever I can do, I’ll be around, want to be supportive, discuss strategy with who he plays, obviously, and that other stuff.

Q. John, I’m obviously obsessed with Andy’s attempts to break into Djokovic’s dominance. Is there a chance he could be more susceptible after completing the career slam or is it more likely he’ll relax and be more formidable?
JOHN McENROE: That’s a good question. That’s a tremendous question that I don’t know the answer to. I would say Andy’s hoping the former takes place.  I doubt that (Novak) is going to let down. I think there may be, if anything, more pressure because he’ll be going for the actual calendar-year slam. This is something monumental. He’s already done something monumental.  He’s in a fantastic space. He’s unbelievably consistent, scary consistent. Andy played well, played a great first set at the French. This guy stepped it up to like a gear that was frighteningly good. It was like taking a body blow, a shot to the stomach. It was hard to recuperate. He made a little bit of a run at the end, but the damage had been done.  This guy, he’s very, very formidable. I think Andy is playing extremely well, actually the best I’ve ever seen him play at the French. First time I thought he had the chance to win it.

He’s as prepared as he possibly can be. I think his chances are better, for reasons I mentioned earlier. The crowd will be much more behind him. I think the game suits him better. He sort of has that cat-and-mouse thing. Novak has gotten much better at that, too.  It’s a tall order, but I think if you said to me he has a better shot of beating Novak at Wimbledon than the French, although he could have done it, I think he’s got a better shot.  He’s positioned himself as well as he possibly can. He hasn’t beaten him in a while. He beat him in Rome. He’s believing more. But that’s certainly another reason why I thought he brought Ivan in.

 

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Vesnina Defeats Defending Champ Bencic in Eastbourne

Elena Vesnina photo courtesy of MiamiTennisNews.com

Elena Vesnina photo courtesy of MiamiTennisNews.com

(June 21, 2016) Third seed and defending champion Belinda Bencic lost to 2013 winner Elena Vesnina 7-6 (4), 7-6 (5) on Tuesday in the second round of the Eastbourne International.

Top seed Agnieszka Radwanska moved on when her opponent Mirjana Lucic-Baroni retired with gastrointestinal illness with the Polish woman leading Radwanska led 6-4, 2-1.

“She was still playing great tennis, very powerful game, very consistent,” said Radwanska. “So I was surprised that something happened to her.”

“Well, very tough conditions today,” Radwanska said. “I think the first day that it was really windy. And with her powerful game, sometimes it’s hard to find a right rhythm from the beginning.

“But, well, is not easy match for the first round as well here. But, well, still happy that I could win that one-and-a-half sets and ready for the next one.”

Second seed Roberta Vinci lost to 2010 champion Ekaterina Makarova 4-6, 6-4, 6-3. A total of ten seeded players lost on Tuesday including fourth seed Timea Bacsinszky, sixth seed Svetlana Kuznetsova and eighth seed Carla Suarez Navarro.

Fifth seed and two-time Wimbledon champion Petra Kvitova advanced with a straight sets win over Timea Babos.

“I think that I’m kind of feeling that I am playing well, even though I kind of lost some of the matches in a couple of months,” Kvitova said. “But I think it’s pretty good.

“The main thing is to stay healthy, for sure. Otherwise I feel good. I think that the mental side should be a little bit, you know, stronger.”

Caroline Wozniacki is into the third round by dominating seventh seed Samantha Stosur 6-2, 6-1.

“I feel good, said the Dane. “The ankle is feeling good. As long as I’m stable and moving well, it feels good.

“I’m pleased with the way I have been playing. You know, the first match I played quite well, but today I feel I played even better. Hopefully there is more tennis to come.”

 

AEGON INTERNATIONAL – EASTBOURNE, GREAT BRITAIN
$776,878
JUNE 19 – 25, 2016

RESULTS – JUNE 21, 2016
Women’s Singles – Second Round
[1] A. Radwanska (POL) d [Q] M. Lucic-Baroni (CRO) 64 21 Retired (Gastrointestinal Illness)
E. Makarova (RUS) d [2] R. Vinci (ITA) 46 64 63
E. Vesnina (RUS) d [3] B. Bencic (SUI) 76(4) 76(5)
K. Mladenovic (FRA) d [4] T. Bacsinszky (SUI) 61 75
[5] P. Kvitova (CZE) d T. Babos (HUN) 64 76(5)
[Q] K. Bondarenko (UKR) d [6] S. Kuznetsova (RUS) 26 64 75
C. Wozniacki (DEN) d [7] S. Stosur (AUS) 62 61
M. Doi (JPN) d [8] C. Suárez Navarro (ESP) 36 64 61
[10] Ka. Pliskova (CZE) d D. Gavrilova (AUS) 62 62
[11] J. Konta (GBR) d L. Tsurenko (UKR) 76(4) 61
[12] D. Cibulkova (SVK) d J. Ostapenko (LAT) 63 63
A. Petkovic (GER) d [13] S. Errani (ITA) 61 36 64
[Q] M. Brengle (USA) d [14] A. Pavlyuchenkova (RUS) 64 63
E. Bouchard (CAN) d [15] I. Begu (ROU) 63 61
A. Friedsam (GER) d [16] L. Safarova (CZE) 76(5) 64
[Q] M. Puig (PUR) d [Q] A. Konjuh (CRO) 61 53 Retired  ( Neck Injury )
First Round
[Q] M. Lucic-Baroni (CRO) d [LL] D. Allertova (CZE) 64 62
[Q] K. Bondarenko (UKR) d Y. Putintseva (KAZ) 62 46 64
A. Friedsam (GER) d [LL] A. Kontaveit (EST) 67(3) 64 64
M. Doi (JPN) d [Q] P. Hercog (SLO) 64 64
D. Gavrilova (AUS) d A. Schmiedlova (SVK) 61 75
[Q] M. Brengle (USA) d [Q] A. Van Uytvanck (BEL) 67(4) 76(4) 62
L. Tsurenko (UKR) d [LL] S. Zhang (CHN) 61 76(3)

Women’s Doubles – First Round
[4] T. Babos (HUN) / Y. Shvedova (KAZ) d A. Medina Garrigues (ESP) / A. Parra Santonja (ESP) 61 62
D. Jurak (CRO) / A. Rodionova (AUS) d G. Dabrowski (CAN) / D. Kasatkina (RUS) 64 16 10-6
Y. Xu (CHN) / S. Zheng (CHN) d C. Chuang (TPE) / C. Liang (CHN) 26 63 10-6

ORDER OF PLAY – WEDNESDAY, JUNE 22, 2016
CENTRE COURT start 11:00 am
[Q] M. Puig (PUR) vs C. Wozniacki (DEN)

Not Before 1:00 pm
[1] A. Radwanska (POL) vs E. Bouchard (CAN)
[5] P. Kvitova (CZE) vs [11] J. Konta (GBR)
A. Petkovic (GER) vs E. Makarova (RUS)
[1] M. Hingis (SUI) / S. Mirza (IND) or [WC] L. Safarova (CZE) / S. Stosur (AUS) vs D. Jurak (CRO) / A. Rodionova (AUS)

COURT 1 start 11:00 am
[12] D. Cibulkova (SVK) vs [Q] K. Bondarenko (UKR)
K. Mladenovic (FRA) vs A. Friedsam (GER)
[Q] M. Brengle (USA) vs E. Vesnina (RUS)
M. Doi (JPN) vs [10] Ka. Pliskova (CZE)
After suitable rest – [3] E. Makarova (RUS) / E. Vesnina (RUS) vs [PR] A. Groenefeld (GER) / K. Peschke (CZE) or A. Klepac (SLO) / K. Srebotnik (SLO)

COURT 2 start Not Before 1:00 pm
[1] M. Hingis (SUI) / S. Mirza (IND) vs [WC] L. Safarova (CZE) / S. Stosur (AUS)
[PR] A. Groenefeld (GER) / K. Peschke (CZE) vs A. Klepac (SLO) / K. Srebotnik (SLO) 36 20  To finish
Y. Xu (CHN) / S. Zheng (CHN) vs [4] T. Babos (HUN) / Y. Shvedova (KAZ)
[WC] N. Broady (GBR) / H. Watson (GBR) or R. Atawo (USA) / A. Spears (USA) vs S. Errani (ITA) / O. Kalashnikova (GEO) or [2] H. Chan (TPE) / Y. Chan (TPE)

COURT 3 start 12:00 noon
[WC] N. Broady (GBR) / H. Watson (GBR) vs R. Atawo (USA) / A. Spears (USA) 57 00  To finish

Not Before 1:00 pm
S. Errani (ITA) / O. Kalashnikova (GEO) vs [2] H. Chan (TPE) / Y. Chan (TPE) 00  To finish

 

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