November 27, 2015

Eurovision and Food Poisoning – The World According to Andrea Petkovic


By Ros Satar

(June 24, 2015) EASTBOURNE, England – People often ask me why I prefer to follow the Women’s Tour. In fact just this week a colleague from Tennis Panorama wanted to know why I had missed Queen’s. I preferred to freeze my socks off in my old university city of Birmingham and watch the first of two weeks of Premier competition before Wimbledon.


Alas, I arrived too late to catch one of the more enduring characters of the tour Andrea Petkovic who lost to one of many of the strong Czechs who can really play on grass, losing to feisty teen Katerina Siniakova. However she redressed the balance in some style against another of the tour’s young stars Caroline Garcia.


“Well they play so flat and she played well. I didn’t play too bad, as I said I was a little insecure on the first match on grass. It’s not like on clay, I just need my time, and once we were in the tiebreaker I was ‘oh first match n grass, third set tiebreaker, what’s gonna happen?’ and it was over in a blink already.


“But well, you know now I played really well today so hopefully I can build on that.”


So exactly what is the issue with the stuff?


Petkovic explained her theories on the subject: “The thing with grass, I’ve figured now over the years, I think the first match that you play on grass is very determinate about your future on grass, and mine was kinda traumatic.


“So always in the beginning when I was still young and I wasn’t able to put things into perspective, I always told myself, ‘you’re bad on grass’ because one match that I played, I was bad on grass. Now that I’m a little older, I know that I’m not as natural on grass as I am on clay. The moment I step on clay I feel very comfortable, I know how to move, how to slide, because I grew up on it. It’s quite normal, right?


“And the moment I step on grass I feel a little off, I don’t know how to move and it takes me time. It’s not that I play bad on grass, it just takes me much more time than on other surfaces.”


With this being the first season where grass has now been extended to make the entire season five weeks long, it was curious to see that Petkovic’s grass tally throughout her career coming into this match was dead even at 11/11. She had a great run at ‘s-Hertogenbosch in 2010 but the two terrible years of almost career threatening injuries gave the German a new perspective.


She explained: “When you’re young and you’re going through normal youth, you don’t normally deal with stuff, right? Just I have to do homework, parents are annoying, parents are bothering you, they won’t let you go to a party, whatever.”


Petkovic came to tennis comparatively late, turning pro at 19 and she continued: “That’s the thing that you have to deal with and all of a sudden, as a tennis player You’re there, there are hundreds of people watching you, you feel the expectation of the media, you feel the pressure and all of a sudden you have to deal with pressure at such a young age and it takes a lot of energy.


“I was drained after matches, even if I won 6-2 6-2, I wanted it so much and I was expecting so much and everybody was watching me and if I lost what would people say and what would people think, which is what I think is quite natural for young people to care more about what other people say about you.”


Her injuries came right at the peak of her career. She had reached the Top 10 but the injuries started to rack up. She struggled with a right knee injury for the tail end of the 2011 season before the really bad luck hit, with a lower back injury that made her miss the Australian Open through to the spring hard court swing. On her return in Stuttgart, a home tournament that means a great deal to her, she injured her ankle, resulting in another four months off the tour, and another knee injury saw her miss the first two months of 2013 (including the Australian Open again). She rose from 177 in March of that year to finishing the year ranked No. 39.


She explains: “Obviously when you’re a little older, you’ve gone through stuff, you had sickness in the family, whatever, you know stuff you really have to deal with, not some stupid pressure because you care about what people think. And I think changes us older players and players who’ve gone through injury and for me I was quite unlucky where I was out for two years almost on the height of my career when I was Top 10, and I was playing really well. And then I came back and all these new young players were there now and I had to deal with double the competition all of the sudden after being absent for two years.


“So I’ve just grown as a person and I’m not taking anything for granted anymore. I’m not taking the wins for granted and I’m not taking the losses as bad, and I think that’s a better balance, just in general.


“I hope, but you never know, there is one loss and you still go depressive on yourself and watch sad French movies and cry yourself to sleep (laughs).”


For a player that loves the clay (and not in the sense of using it to make unpopular relatives ashtrays as gifts), it was a crying shame this year that her clay court season was marred once more with injury and then food poisoning.


She can laugh about it now but the effects knocked her out of the two Premier Mandatory events in the run up to Roland Garros.


“For me was kind of a tough thing that my clay court went sort of to the dumpster because of my food poisoning and my hamstring. I was sitting at the doctors and I couldn’t sit, I was falling down like this [falls from side to side]. I was like ‘ok you know when you feel bad you’re like in one day, two days it will be over. And I was [thinking] that I have to pull out of Madrid but I will be fine for Rome. It didn’t get better and that was the worst thing, In the end I took antibiotics and it went gradually better.”


However, it did not stop her from taking to Twitter during the Eurovision Song Contest this year. For those that have no idea why once a year a large proportion of (admittedly) European players and a fair few tennis writers go a bit mental for a week, there is an annual song competition between a bunch of competing countries in Europe, and a few oddities including Australia this year to celebrate 60 years of the competition.


On the night, Petkovic ruled Twitter with a steady stream of hilarious commentary, and while we both admitted to each other that once it used to be our guilty pleasure, we had fun talking theories and whether or not this year was a classic.


She surmised: “Not so classic year and I will tell you why. I have a theory and I think my theory, it’s not scientifically proven but it should be.


“Every year the winner song gets copied in the year after, and the problem with last year’s (that’s why Conchita won, because she was special obviously on one hand) but on the other hand, because she had a ballad and everybody else was doing this europop dance thing, because the year before Sweden had won with Euphoria. So this year everybody went for the ballad thing and so it was kind of boring.


“And so next year it will be really good because everyone will do some kind of Heroes, there will be a lot of hot guys, so I am expecting a huge Eurovision for 2016” she said, laughing out loud.


It has always been an amusing mystery why the tennis community is so bound up in this annual madness, but Petkovic had a theory on that too.


“I think one factor is definitely that it’s during Rome/Paris clay thing where you’re in Europe so it’s always in the evening, it’s quite late and you’re probably already back from dinner. I mean I plan my day according to the Eurovision but you can’t expect that from everybody (laughing).


“Most of the players they play a lot and so they have to rest their souls and can rest your soul the best by watching Eurovision Song Contest. I really don’t know (laughing) but it’s amazing.


“I always [used to] watch with my sister and now when my sister is not with me, I have twitter. I would like to see a statistic to see how many people unfollow me during Eurovision – so many probably (more laughter).”


Petkovic is nothing if not genial, engaging and there is a reason why she is one of the most popular players amongst fans. And despite her determinate first steps on grass those many years ago, she has just advanced to the Eastbourne quarter-finals, for the first time, where she will face Caroline Wozniacki.


Ros Satar is a British sports journalist covering tennis, and can also be found at Britwatch Sports.


Venus Williams Loses to Carla Suarez Navarro in Miami Open Quarterfinal

Carla Suarez Navarro

Carla Suarez Navarro

(March 31, 2015) In a very topsy-turvy match, Spain’s Carla Suarez Navarro recovered from losing the first set 6-0 to recover to defeat three-time champion Venus Williams at the Miami Open on Tuesday 0-6, 6-1, 7-5 to reach the semifinals.

Williams needed just 27 minutes to blow out Suarez Navarro in the first set, nailing 14 winners.

The second set saw a reversal of fortune for the Spaniard, as she moved 16th seeded Williams from corner to corner, dominating with her forehand.

Both women broke each other’s serve, the 12th seed Suarez Navarro coming back from twice from being a break down.

Williams made 41 unforced errors.

The victory for the Spaniard moves her into the most important semifinal of her career- a Premier Mandatory. A win in the semifinal will move her into the top ten for the first time.

“It was a crazy match, crazy first two sets,” said the winner. “Venus was unbelievable at the beginning.

“I start a little bit nervous, but, you know, in tennis, even if you lost the first set, you’re still in competition. I’m happy with the way I come back after the first set.”

“Just a little too many errors and I was going for it the whole match,” Williams said. “Towards the end just never found the happy medium between being aggressive and putting the ball in the court.”

“Of course I want to play well every match as much as I can,” the seven-time major champion said, “I feel like I have the ability to win this match.

“Unfortunately it was a loss, but I learned a lot from them, and they always make me better. “

The Spaniard will play No. 9 seed Andrea Petkovic for a place in the final. The German ousted No. 14 Karolina Pliskova 6-4, 6-2, earlier in the day.


Petkovic Wins Antwerp Crown with Walkover Against Suarez Navarro


(February 15, 2015) Third-seeded Andrea Petkovic of Germany won her sixth career WTA title when fifth-seed Carla Suarez Navarro of Spain withdrew from Sunday’s final of the Diamond Games in Antwerp with a neck injury.

“Right before we went on court I was warming up and they told me the news,” Petkovic said. “At first I was very shocked because I didn’t know anything about her physical pain and the blockage. But secondly I was sad. I really like Carla – she’s a great person and always friendly and positive, and she has a tremendous amount of talent. Also, you can never really enjoy the win when you don’t fight for it. So I’m happy I had a great week and I’m leaving as the champion, but definitely mixed emotions.”

“I woke up in the morning and just felt this pain in my neck,” Suarez Navarro said. “I went to the physio to get treatment and tried to play at 11:30, then had physio again and tried to play again at 2:15, and I just couldn’t serve. I couldn’t play like I wanted. So I had to pull out of this final. I’m really sorry. I love this tournament and I had a great week. I really tried today.”

Petkovic played an exhibition match against four-time major champion and tournament director Kim Clijsters.

“I hope you don’t take any offense Kim, but I’m glad you are done playing on tour,” Petkovic said after losing the exhibition.

For her efforts this week, the 27-year-old Petkovic will move back into the top 10 in the rankings on Monday



2015 Australian Open Women’s Contender Profiles

(January 17, 2015) Profiles of the top Women’s Singles contenders for the 2015 Australian Open. Note: Grand Slam records for main draw matches only.  – by Jack Cunniff

Serena Williams

Serena Williams

2014 Record: 52-8

Grand Slam Record: 259-39

Australian Open Record: 61-9

Australian Open Best Result: Won (2003, ’05, ’07. ’09, ‘10)

Fast Fact: At the Australian Open, Serena has only lost twice to a Top Ten player (2001 to Hingis, 2008 to Jankovic).


Maria Sharapova

2014 Record: 49-13

Grand Slam Record: 165-40

Australian Open Record: 42-10

Australian Open Best Result: Won (2008)

Fast Fact: With her win last week in Brisbane, Sharapova has won a title in each of the last 13 years, placing her 4th in the Open Era behind Navratilova (21), Evert (18), and Graf (14).


Simona Halep

2014 Record: 46-16

Grand Slam Record: 27-18

Australian Open Record: 6-4

Australian Open Best Result: QF (2014)

Fast Fact: Halep celebrated 50 consecutive weeks in the Top Ten, and will mark her one year anniversary during the Australian Open (reached No. 10 on Jan 27, 2014).


Petra Kvitova

2014 Record: 43-16

Grand Slam Record: 64-24

Australian Open Record: 11-6

Australian Open Best Result: SF (2012)

Fast Fact: Kvitova will play her 500th career match in the first round of the Australian Open.


Ana Ivanovic

2014 Record: 58-17

Grand Slam Record: 97-39

Australian Open Record: 24-10

Australian Open Best Result: RU (2008)

Fast Fact: Despite having her best season since 2008, Ivanovic lost to lower-ranked players at all of the Grand Slams in 2014.


Agnieszka Radwanska

2014 Record: 47-22

Grand Slam Record: 90-34

Australian Open Record: 24-8

Australian Open Best Result: SF (2014)

Fast Fact: Since beating Venus Williams to win 2014 Canadian Open (Montreal), Radwanska has a losing record, 8-9.


Eugenie Bouchard

2014 Record: 43-22

Grand Slam Record: 23-7

Australian Open Record: 5-1

Australian Open Best Result: SF (2014)

Fast Fact: Bouchard won more Grand Slam matches in 2014 than any other woman (19).


Caroline Wozniacki

2014 Record: 49-19

Grand Slam Record: 79-31

Australian Open Record: 22-7

Australian Open Best Result: SF (2011)

Fast Fact: Wozniacki has a 7-0 record in opening round matches at the Australian Open, the only Grand Slam event that she has not lost in the first round.


Angelique Kerber

2014 Record: 47-24

Grand Slam Record: 48-28

Australian Open Record: 11-7

Australian Open Best Result: 4R (2013, ‘14)

Fast Fact: Kerber has a 1-7 record against Top 50 players at the Australian Open.


Ekaterina Makarova

2014 Record: 41-21

Grand Slam Record: 48-29

Australian Open Record: 18-7

Australian Open Best Result: QF (2012, ‘13)

Fast Fact: In her last four Australian Open appearances, Makarova has defeated four Grand Slam champions (Ivanovic, S. Williams, Bartoli, V. Williams).


Dominika Cibulkova

2014 Record: 32-24

Grand Slam Record: 53-29

Australian Open Record: 13-7

Australian Open Best Result: RU (2014)

Fast Fact: Cibulkova has won only six matches since Wimbledon, as many matches as she won en route to the Australian Open final in 2014.


Flavia Pennetta

2014 Record: 33-20

Grand Slam Record: 69-45

Australian Open Record: 13-11

Australian Open Best Result: QF (2014)

Fast Fact: Pennetta had a losing record at the Australian Open until reaching the QF in 2014.


Andrea Petkovic

2014 Record: 41-23

Grand Slam Record: 31-20

Australian Open Record: 6-5

Australian Open Best Result: QF (2011)

Fast Fact: Petkovic hasn’t won a match at the Australian Open since 2011 (def. Sharapova 4R).


Venus Williams

2014 Record: 32-14

Grand Slam Record: 221-57

Australian Open Record: 41-14

Australian Open Best Result: RU (2003)

Fast Fact: With her 2014 Australian Open appearance, Venus moves into 3rd place in the Open Era with 65 Slam appearances, trailing only Frazier (71) and Navratilova (67).


Victoria Azarenka

2014 Record: 15-9

Grand Slam Record: 101-32

Australian Open Record: 32-7

Australian Open Best Result: Won (2012, ’13)

Fast Fact: Azarenka enters a Grand Slam event unseeded for the first time since 2007 U.S. Open, after 27 Slams where she was seeded.




Andrea Petkovic Wins WTA Tournament of Champions

Andrea Petkovic

Andrea Petkovic

(November 2, 2014) Andrea Petkovic came back to beat Flavia Pennetta of Italy 1-6, 6-4, 6-3 on Sunday to win the WTA Tournament of Champions is Sofia, Bulgaria. For Petkovic, it’s her third title of the year, fifth of her career.

“I am very happy to win the title at the end of this long season,” the German said. “I dedicate my victory to my dad,” who also is her coach Zoran Petkovic.

“I love watching Flavia play, but I hate playing her because she’s so difficult to play! I’m happy could gather enough energy in the end and play well enough to win it in the end.”

Petkovic’s performance this week will move her ranking up to No. 14 on Monday.


WTA Event Enters Its Fourth Year at Citi Open

Alison Riske at  Kid's clinic at Citi Open. Photo by Christopher Levy @tennis_shots

Alison Riske at Kid’s clinic at Citi Open. Photo by Christopher Levy @tennis_shots

By Dave Gertler


(July 28, 2014) Now in its fourth year, the WTA Citi Open event in Washington is hosting one of its most impressive fields to date, even with the withdrawal of tournament favorite Eugenie Bouchard. Now seeded at No.1, Lucie Safarova leads an exciting field of 32 women including some top European hard-courters as well as American up-and-comers.


For the last two years running, it has been Slovakian Magdalena Rybarikova who has capitalized on a line-up that has been improving from scratch since Washington began hosting the WTA International event in 2011. The world No. 37 is undefeated across ten straight matches at the tournament, and has defeated the top seed both years – Anastasia Pavlyuchenkova in 2012, and Angelique Kerber in 2013. Russian Pavlyuchenkova was ranked 28 at the time, while this year all eight top seeds are within the WTA’s top 29. Rybarikova did not play the Citi Open’s inaugural tournament in 2011, when world No.24 at the time, Shahar Peer, reached the final as No.1 seed, losing to second-seeded Nadia Petrova.


While Rybarikova is back in 2014 to attempt to prolong her dynasty at the Citi Open, Bouchard, Peer, Petrova, Kerber and her opponent in the 2013 final, Germany’s Andrea Petkovic, are prominent names missing from this year’s player field. The impact of their absences on the tournament, however, will be heavily reduced by the fact of the players that ARE attending.


Sloane Stephens leads the camp of exciting ‘new-wave’ of WTA players that will be in attendance this year. The world No. 22 – known for being much more solid at majors than she is across the WTA Premier and International calendar year – first entered the Citi Open in 2011, when she was 18 years old and ranked outside the top 120, losing in the first round. The following year, ranked just inside the top 50, she would reach the Washington semi-finals, losing to the eventual champ Rybarikova. In 2013, as a top 20 player, she would lose in the first round once again. It would seem apparent, therefore, that she’s due for another enduring showing at the Citi Open this year.


Although Bouchard has withdrawn from the 2014 tournament as the top seed, citing a knee injury, her results have been mixed since the Citi Open initiated their relationship with the Canadian in 2011 when they offered her a wildcard into her first main draw of a WTA event. In 2012 she lost a quarterfinal to Stephens, while last year – ranked No.62 in the world – she lost in the first round. Having reached at least the semi-finals of all three grand slams since then, Bouchard’s ranking has shot up to No.7 at the start of the Emirates Airlines US Open Series.


While the tournament has secured the first-time attendance of its high-profile Czech top seed Lucie Safarova, this only serves to augment the returned appearance of Romanian Sorana Cirstea, France’s Alize Cornet and American Madison Keys.


Cornet last year reached semi-finals on her first appearance at Citi Open. While the third seed will be vying for her fifth career WTA title, many Washingtonian tennis enthusiasts will have their eye on rising American talent, Madison Keys, who will be taking her career-high No.27 ranking into the Citi Open draw for her second appearance there. Despite retiring injured from her most recent match, a third-rounder at Wimbledon, Keys has been one of the big movers since clay season ended, going 8-2 on grass, and taking her first WTA title at Eastbourne along the way. Keys’ big serving game is a force to be reckoned with on hard courts, and has already ushered her to two WTA Tour semi-final appearances over the past year.


While unseeded Magdalena Rybarikova has managed to upset the field for the past two years straight, this year she faces a much tougher task if she’s to three-peat, considering the elevated level of play that will be coming off the racquets of top seeds with whom the Citi Open has been developing strong relationships over the past few years.


Dave Gertler is a tennis journalist, player and musician based in Sydney covering Citi Open for Tennis Panorama News. Follow his Twitter updates from the tournament @TennisNewsTPN, follow him on his personal Twitter @davegertler,  read his blog,  and listen to his podcast, Tennis Days .


Andrea Petkovic Beats Shelby Rogers for Bad Gastein Crown



(July 13, 2014) Andrea Petkovic won her second title of the year at the Gastein Ladies on Sunday. The 20th ranked German defeated Shelby Rogers of the United States 6-3, 6-3 to add to her Charleston title in April which was also on clay.

Surprise finalist 21-year-old Rogers, ranked at 147th had to come through qualifying, had precious never reached the second round of a WTA event before this week. She knovked out her first ever top 50 players this week in No. 16 Carla Suarez Navarro, No. 40 Camila Giorgi and No. 14 Sara Errani en route to the final.

“It’s a super feeling, I am totally happy,” said Petkovic, who making strides to get back in the top 10 again, a feat she accomplished 3 years ago. “I want back into the top 10 and I am just playing good tennis. My serve and my footwork can still improve but I am playing well.”

Shelby Rogers photo by Christopher Levy @tennis_shots

Shelby Rogers photo by Christopher Levy @tennis_shots

“I wanted this victory so badly,” Petkovic said. “I am very relieved. Shelby played very aggressive tennis. I didn’t know her game but I’ve done some research on YouTube.”

“Playing in a final there are always some nerves, but I was expecting that and expecting a tough opponent. I’ve never won two two tournaments in a year before and I’m obviously very happy to achieve this.”

“I had an incredible time,” said Rogers, who has won four tournaments on the ITF circuit. “This has definitely been a week I will never forget.”

“I’m definitely feeling the matches, I’ve played a lot this week,  but she played incredible and is always a tough competitor,” Rogers continued. “I’m still so happy with my whole week, though. I had such a great time here. The fans were amazing too. I had an incredible time here on and off the court.

“It was just an incredible experience this year in Bad Gastein.”


Simona Halep and Andrea Petkovic Reach French Open Semis




(June 4, 2014) Andrea Petkovic and Simona Halep have both moved into their first-ever Grand Slam semifinal, both advancing with 6-2, 6-2 quarterfinal victories at the French Open on Wednesday. The matches on the show courts had their starts delayed by rain.

The 28th seeded Petkovic from Germany defeated 10th seed Sara Errani, the losing finalist at the French Open in 2012. Halep, the fourth seed beat 2009 Roland Garros champion Svetlana Kuznetsova the 27th seed.

“I have to say, today I was in a real zone. I didn’t think at all,” said an excited Petkovic. “I was just focused on what I had to do.”

“I had a very good game plan from my coach. It didn’t work in the beginning, so I was getting a little, not panicked, but when you have a certain game plan and you lose the first two games and it’s not working, so I was kind of getting a little worried,” Petkovic said. “I was lucky that I started playing better and that I was putting more balls into play.”

At one point last year when Petkovic lost in the French Open qualification tournament, she considered quitting tennis, now she’s in her first major semifinal.

The highest seed remaining in the women’s draw, No. 4 seed Halep held back Kuznetsova who had an injured left thigh and had to take a medical time out after the first set.


“I felt very good on court. It was a perfect day for me. I played really well and stuck to my gameplan,” Halep said to press. “I was very aggressive. I played very fast.
“So it was a good match, and I’m really happy that now I can play in the semifinals in Paris.”

Petkovic and Halep will face off for a spot in the French Open final, the winner playing the winner of the Maria Sharapova versus Eugenie Bouchard.


Andrea Petkovic Wins Family Circle Cup


(April 6, 2014) In a week full of surprises in Charleston, 14th seed Andrea Petkovic won the Family Circle Cup for her first WTA Premier level tournament title with a 7-5, 6-2 win over Jana Cepelova of Slovakia on Sunday. This is her third WTA tournament crown, first in three years since she won the Strasbourg title in 2011.

Petkkovic knocked out three top ten seeds on the road to the title – No. 4 Sabine Lisicki, No. 9 Lucie Safarova and No. 6 Eugenie Bouchard.

The German who was once No. 9 in the world before being beset by injuries, is currently at No. 40 in the world will move into the top thirty with the victory.

No. 78 Cepelova beat No. 1 Serena Williams in the second round of the tournament. She’ll see her ranking rise into the top 50 for the first time.

At the end of the match Petkovic dropped on the ground in celebrations before she came to the net and hugged her opponent.

“I don’t know why but I just sort of broke down,” Petkovic said. “I was happy. Normally I don’t cry when I’m sad – I cry when I’m happy, strangely, so it’s weird, but I don’t know. I was just so relieved and proud that I’ve come back from all these injuries, and I never thought I would play in the finals of the big tournaments again, and so I was just proud and happy and everything just sort of came together.”

Petkovic takes home $120,000 for the win.


Defending China Open Champ Victoria Azarenka Done in by Double Faults and Andrea Petkovic


(September 30, 2013) BEIJING – Double faults and erratic play were the undoing of defending China Open champion and No. 2 Victoria Azarenka on Monday. She lost to Andrea Petkovic 6-4 2-6 6-4 in first round play in Beijing.

To go along with 15 double faults, Azarenka hit 44 unforced errors and appeared to still be suffering from the effects of an illness she had during last week’s Tokyo event where she lost in the second round.

“I don’t take the last week even as a tournament,” she continued.

“If I’m going to be doing it again, I probably should have taken a longer break and just prepare myself.  I don’t feel like I was ready to play ‑‑ there is no excuse ‑‑ to be 100%, but the preparation wasn’t there enough, so I cannot deny that.

“It’s just my mistakes for not paying much attention after the US Open how I managed my time and how I managed my health.  I mean, today’s match is today’s match.  I felt good.  I didn’t have any issues, but overall, that comes maybe.  There is no excuses.”

“It was an awful match and very bad performance from me, so not much to say,” Azarenka said.

“It happens once, twice a year to every player, and happened to me today.”

Andrea Petkovic

Andrea Petkovic

Petkovic appeared ill in the second set when she had to take a medical time out. She lost seven games on the trot and the Belarusian evened up the match at a set all.

In the third set both women traded breaks but it was Azarenka’s 15th double fault coming on break point as she was serving in the ninth game which cost her the game. The German served out the match after that.

“I’m going to come back, reevaluate, practice more,” Azarenka said in response to the loss.  “I just needed more preparation, and that’s what I’m going to get now before the last tournament.”



Beijing, China
September 28-October 6, 2013

Results – Monday, September 30, 2013
WTA Singles – Second Round
(5) Sara Errani (ITA) d. (Q) Misaki Doi (JPN) 63 62
Lucie Safarova (CZE) d. Kaia Kanepi (EST) 63 63

WTA Singles – First Round
Andrea Petkovic (GER) d. (2) Victoria Azarenka (BLR) 64 26 64
(8) Jelena Jankovic (SRB) d. Anastasia Pavlyuchenkova (RUS) 16 64 60
(14) Ana Ivanovic (SRB) d. Flavia Pennetta (ITA) 76(9) 61
Svetlana Kuznetsova (RUS) d. Hsieh Su-Wei (TPE) 61 61
Bojana Jovanovski (SRB) d. Sorana Cirstea (ROU) 63 62
(Q) Eugenie Bouchard (CAN) d. Magdalena Rybarikova (SVK) 64 61
(Q) Polona Hercog (SLO) d. Monica Puig (PUR) 61 64
(Q) Galina Voskoboeva (KAZ) d. (Q) Sharon Fichman (CAN) 64 63
(WC) Zhang Shuai (CHN) d. Peng Shuai (CHN) 63 63

WTA Doubles – First Round
Lisicki/Medina Garrigues (GER/ESP) d. (5) Groenefeld/Peschke (GER/CZE) 64 16 103 (Match TB)
(8) Black/Mirza (ZIM/IND) d. Date-Krumm/Scheepers (JPN/RSA) 63 63
Chan/Huber (TPE/USA) d. (WC) Williams/Williams (USA/USA) 67(3) 64 119 (Match TB)
Soler-Espinosa/Suárez Navarro (ESP/ESP) d. (WC) Sun/Zhang (CHN/CHN) 76(4) 60
Chan/Zheng (TPE/CHN) d. (WC) Shvedova/Zhang (KAZ/CHN) 63 36 105 (Match TB)
Hantuchova/Raymond (SVK/USA) d. Kudryavtseva/Rodionova (RUS/AUS) 75 63
Dushevina/Parra Santonja (RUS/ESP) d. Husarova/Kalashnikova (SVK/GEO) 62 63

ATP Singles – First Round
[WC] L Hewitt (AUS) d [7] T Haas (GER) 76(6) 63
B Tomic (AUS) d [WC] Z Zhang (CHN) 76(4) 64
[Q] R Bautista Agut (ESP) d G Dimitrov (BUL) 64 62
F Fognini (ITA) d T Robredo (ESP) 75 46 63
P Kohlschreiber (GER) d A Montanes (ESP) 75 16 76(4)

ATP Doubles – First Round
[3] A Qureshi (PAK) / J Rojer (NED) d [WC] Y Lu (TPE) / D Wu (CHN) 64 63