February 11, 2016

Statement from Tennis Governing Bodies – Tennis Announces Independent Review

(January 26, 2016) Tennis’ governing bodies announced on Wednesday at the Australian Open that they will assign an independent review of their Tennis Integrity Unit to try and regain “public confidence” in the sport after the BBC and BuzzFeed News reported match-fixing involving top 50 players.

Here is the press release sent to media:

Statement from Tennis Governing Bodies
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE 27 January, 2016 AEDT
Tennis Announces Independent Review
 Independent Review Panel will:
o review and report on the appropriateness and effectiveness of the Tennis Anti-Corruption Program (TACP)
o take into account public commentary regarding the processes, procedures and resources
o make recommendations for change
 Adam Lewis QC to head Independent Review Panel (IRP)
 Commitment to fund and implement all actions recommended by the IRP
(Melbourne, Australia, 27 January 2016) The Chairmen and CEOs of the Governing Bodies of International Tennis – ATP, WTA, ITF and the Grand Slam Board – today announced an independent review headed by Adam Lewis QC aimed at further safeguarding the integrity of the game.
The Independent Review Panel will review and report on the appropriateness and effectiveness of the Tennis Anti-Corruption Program and make recommendations for change. In conducting the review, the IRP will take into account public commentary regarding the processes, procedures and resources of the Tennis Integrity Unit (TIU). The Governing Bodies of International Tennis said they expect the IRP to address issues including:
 How the TIU can be more transparent without compromising the TIU’s need for investigative confidentiality
 Additional resources for the TIU both within the unit and at tournaments
 Structural and/or governance changes that enhance the independence of the TIU
 How to extend the scope and reach of the tennis integrity education program.
The Governing Bodies of International Tennis commit to make the outcomes and recommendations of the IRP publicly available and to implement and fund all the actions recommended by the IRP.
Adam Lewis QC is recognised as the leading expert on sports law at the London Bar. He co-edits the principal textbook, Sport: Law and Practice, lectures on sports law and regularly chairs various sports tribunals, and acts as an arbitrator.
Mr Lewis will be assisted on the Independent Review Panel by two members that he will select and appoint to reflect the global nature of the sport.
The IRP will report to the Governing Bodies of International Tennis. An interim report will be provided by the IRP.
“This review will build on the 2008 Environmental Report that saw tennis become one of the first major sports to establish its own dedicated anti-corruption unit. Since 2010, the Tennis Integrity Unit-instigated anti-corruption investigations have resulted in 18 successful disciplinary cases being brought forward including life bans for five players and one official,’’ the statement said.

All professional players, support staff and officials are subject to the terms of the Tennis Anti-Corruption Program which equips the TIU with substantial investigative powers. These include the right to interview any relevant person of interest and obtain their telephone, computer and bank records.
“Tennis remains one of the leaders in integrity. We have a zero-tolerance approach to all aspects of corruption and all of us are absolutely committed to rooting out corruption whatever it takes.
“The environment for all major sports, including tennis, has changed dramatically over the past eight years and combined with issues raised in the media, we believe now is the right time to review how we continue to fight corruption in the game.
“Given the seriousness of the issue, we call on all governments worldwide to make match fixing a distinct criminal offence, resourced by national crime fighting agencies working in cooperation with sports integrity boards and other relevant stakeholders.”

Signed by:
Chris Kermode, ATP Chairman
Steve Simon, WTA CEO
David Haggerty, ITF President
Stephen Healy, Australian Open Chairman
Jean Gachassin, Roland Garros Chairman
Katrina Adams, US Open Chairman
Philip Brook, Tennis Integrity Board Chairman and Wimbledon Chairman

Related Articles:

Media Statement From Tennis’ Governing Bodies in Reaction to BBC and BuzzFeed News’s Report on Match Fixing
In Their Own Words – Players Reactions to Allegations of Match Fixing
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Line-up Confirmed for 2016 ITF Junior Masters

ITF

(January 25, 2016) Hungarian duo Dalma Galfi, the 2015 ITF Girls World Champion, and Mate Valkusz, the current boys’ world No. 1, head the entry for the 2016 ITF Junior Masters taking place at the Sichuan International Tennis Centre in Chengdu, China on 8-10 April.

 

The ITF Junior Masters, now in its second year, is an international event showcasing eight male and eight female players who qualify on the basis of their 18-and-under ITF Junior World Ranking at the end of the year. The ITF Junior Masters consists of two knock-out singles events, with each player guaranteed three matches to determine their final finishing position. Players will compete for a total prize fund of $160,000 in travel grants, and will also compete for wild cards into professional events.

 

The following players will contest the 2016 ITF Junior Masters:

 

Women’s singles


Dalma Galfi (HUN)
Katie Swan (GBR)
Anna Blinkova (RUS)
Tereza Mihalikova (SVK)
Usue Arconada (USA)
Sofia Kenin (USA)
Charlotte Robillard-Millette (CAN)
Kayla Day (USA)

 

Men’s singles


Casper Ruud (NOR)
Mate Valkusz (HUN)
Hong Seong Chan (KOR)
Marcelo Barrios Vera (CHI)
Orlando Luz (BRA)
Miomir Kecmanovic (SRB)
William Blumberg (USA)
Alvaro Lopez San Martin (ESP)

 

Galfi, the 2015 US Open junior champion, lines up alongside Australian Open junior champion Tereza Mihalikova and runner-up Katie Swan, and Wimbledon junior finalist Anna Blinkova. They will be joined by Sofia Kenin, a member of the United States’ 2014 Junior Fed Cup by BNP Paribas winning team.

 

Valkusz, who took over the boys’ No. 1 ranking at the start of 2016, heads up the men’s entries alongside 2015 Orange Bowl junior champion Miomir Kecmanovic, Australian Open junior runner-up Hong Seong Chan and 2014 double Youth Olympic medallist Orlando Luz. They will be joined by 2013 Junior Davis Cup by BNP Paribas winner Alvaro Lopez San Martin.

 

The provision of travel grants is one of the ways in which the ITF Junior Masters assists these top juniors in making a transition from junior tennis to the professional game. Each player competing in the 2016 ITF Junior Masters will earn a minimum travel grant of $7,000, while the boys’ and girls’ champions will both be awarded $15,000 travel grants. Players will also compete for wild cards into professional events donated by National Associations, with further details to be confirmed later this year.

 

The Sichuan International Tennis Centre will host the event for the second year as part of the ITF’s three-year agreement with the Chinese Tennis Association and the Chengdu Sport Bureau. The centre, which was built in 2008 and consists of 32 hard courts, has hosted several international events. The ITF Junior Masters will be staged on the centre’s two show courts, including a 6,000-capacity centre court, with matches broadcast by Sichuan TV and streamed live over the three days of competition.

 

The ITF Junior Masters joins the ITF junior team competitions, the 14-and-under ITF World Junior Tennis competition, and 16-and-under Junior Davis Cup and Junior Fed Cup by BNP Paribas, as the premier junior events on the 2016 ITF calendar.

 

Related article:

A First Round Loss at US Open for Sofia Kenin Provides the “Best Experience”

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In Their Own Words – Players Reactions to Allegations of Match Fixing

(January 18, 2016) On Monday at the Australian Open, players were asked to respond about allegations cited in reports by BBC and BuzzFeed News that tennis authorities have suppressed evidence of match fixing and ignored possible cases involving players ranked in the top 50, including winners of majors in singles and doubles.

 

Here are some of the reactions from players in their news conferences which include Novak Djokovic, Roger Federer, Maria Sharapova and Serena Williams, as well as the specific questions asked.

 

Are you aware of reports today that there is possibly match fixing allegations within professional tennis? Would you be surprised to learn of something like this happening?
SERENA WILLIAMS: Yeah, I just heard about it today, just as a warning that I might be asked about it. But that’s literally all I have heard about it.

Have you ever seen any hint of that, any indications of that at all?
SERENA WILLIAMS: Not that I’m aware of. When I’m playing, I can only answer for me, I play very hard, and every player I play seems to play hard.

I think that, you know, we go –you know, as an athlete, I do everything I can to be not only great, but, you know, historic. You know, if that’s going on, I don’t know about it. You know, I’m kind of sometimes in a little bit of a bubble.

 

Kei Nishikori

Kei Nishikori

There was a report today which suggested there was a problem with match fixing in tennis. Would you be surprised to learn there was a problem with match fixing on the tour?
KEI NISHIKORI: Yeah, it is. I didn’t know anything. It’s a little bit surprised, but, I mean, obviously I never, you know, involve with this. Actually I have no idea what’s going on.

So it’s — yeah.

 

We all turned up today to see the reports of the allegations of match fixing in tennis. What is your take on it? None of these players have been identified. Do you feel bad that it casts a shadow over everybody?
NOVAK DJOKOVIC: I don’t think so. Honestly I’ve heard about the story and I read that there were a couple of players mentioned who are not active anymore, talking about the matches that have happened almost 10 years ago.

Of course, there is no room for any match fixing or corruption in our sport. We’re trying to keep it as clean as possible. We have, I think, a sport evolved and upgraded our programs and authorities to deal with these particular cases.

I don’t think the shadow is cast over our sport. In contrary, people are talking about names, guessing who these players are, guessing those names. But there’s no real proof or evidence yet of any active players, for that matter. As long as it’s like that, it’s just speculation. So I think we have to keep it that way.

Q. In 2007 you were quoted as saying you’d been offered $200,000 to throw a first-round match in St. Petersburg. I believe you didn’t actually even play in the tournament. Can you clarify that and tell us what happened.
NOVAK DJOKOVIC: I was not approached directly. I was approached — well, me personally. I was approached through people that were working with me at that time, that were with my team. Of course, we threw it away right away. It didn’t even get to me, the guy that was trying to talk to me, he didn’t even get to me directly. There was nothing out of it.

Unfortunately there were some, in those times, those days, rumors, some talks, some people were going around. They were dealt with. In the last six, seven years, I haven’t heard anything similar.

I personally was never approached directly, so I have nothing more to say about that.

Q. As a young player on your way up, how did that make you feel, even be indirectly associated with it?
NOVAK DJOKOVIC: It made me feel terrible because I don’t want to be anyhow linked to this kind of — you know, somebody may call it an opportunity. For me, that’s an act of unsportsmanship, a crime in sport honestly. I don’t support it. I think there is no room for it in any sport, especially in tennis.

But, you know, I always have been taught and have been surrounded with people that had nurtured and, you know, respected the sport’s values. That’s the way I’ve grown up. Fortunately for me, I didn’t need to, you know, get directly involved in these particular situations.

Q. (Question regarding attending Zupska Berba wine festival with friend Ilija Bozoljac.)
NOVAK DJOKOVIC: I’m not so sure. Yeah, Ilija is a good friend of mine. I grew up with him. I drink more water than wine, I must say. So although I like to enjoy every once in a while a glass of wine, not more than that.

I’m sure it’s a great festival. For now I don’t really have time. But I do enjoy my life. I don’t know if you question that. But I assure you that I enjoy my life.

Q. You’re someone who takes your role as an ambassador for the sport really seriously. You care about the message you put out there. Does it make you uncomfortable at all that this Grand Slam has a betting company as one of its big sponsors? There’s so many ads, even on Twitter.
NOVAK DJOKOVIC: Well, this is a subject for discussion, I think, today and in the future. It’s a fine line. Honestly it’s on a borderline, I would say. Whether you want to, you know, have betting companies involved in the big tournaments in our sport or not, you know, it’s hard to say what’s right and what’s wrong.

One of the reasons why tennis is a popular and clean sport is because it has always valued its integrity. Protecting that integrity was one of the highest priorities of each and every leadership that was part of the association. I think especially in the Grand Slams that are and always have been the most valued and respected and known tennis tournaments around the world throughout the history of this sport.

You know, I know that there is also many betting companies that on the websites are using the names, the brands, images of tournaments and players and matches in order to profit from that. Tennis hasn’t been really getting the piece of that cake, if you know what I mean.

It’s hard to say. I don’t have yet the stand and clear opinion about that. I think it is a subject of discussion. We’ll see what happens.

Q. We’ve known you for a long time. You always tell it like it is. But how can tennis go to some 137th ranked player who has been struggling on the circuit and tell him don’t double-fault, don’t throw a point here or there, when the top officials themselves go to a betting company and take that money and send an obvious mixed message to everyone?
NOVAK DJOKOVIC: Well, it’s the first time that I hear something like that. Obviously I can’t speak about that from this position where I don’t have the support of the facts and information and evidence, you know. Obviously you hear some stories here and there.

From my knowledge and information about, you know, the match fixing or anything similar, there is nothing happening on the top level, as far as I know. Challenger level, those tournaments, maybe, maybe not. But, you know, I’m not entitled to really talk about it. I can give my opinion. But there is an organization, authorities, people who take care of that on a daily basis and make sure to track it down.

It’s always a choice for a tennis player, an athlete or any person in life. You know, even though it seems that you don’t, but you always have a choice, especially for somebody who is on the tennis court, whether or not you’re going to accept something that is going against everything that the sport stands for.

I would always make the right choice. But I can only speak on my own behalf.

 

 

I’m sure you’ve heard that today there’s been new stories and allegations about match fixing in tennis. As a lot of it happened under your watch when you were head of the Player Council, what is your latest take on it?
ROGER FEDERER: I don’t know exactly how much new things came out, to be quite honest. I heard old names being dropped. That story was checked out. Clearly you got to take it super serious, you know, like they did back in the day. Since we have the Integrity Unit, it puts more pressure on them that a story like this broke again.

But I don’t know how much new things there is out there. It’s just really important that all the governing bodies and all the people involved take it very seriously, that the players know about it. There’s more pressure on these people now maybe because of this story, which is a good thing.

Under my watch, I mean, we discussed it early on. I actually never heard about it until it was brought up at a player meeting when somebody came and spoke about it. I was like, Okay, came totally from left field. Had no clue what it was about. Didn’t sort of know it existed. I hadn’t been approached.

Doesn’t matter whether I’ve been approached or not, I haven’t. It’s a bit farfetched, all these things. Clearly for a few years now we know this is very serious. Got to do everything about it to keep the sport clean. It’s vital, there’s no doubt about it.

You made your views clear on not being probably spent enough on doping, anti-doping. Do you think there’s enough being done with the TIU, enough resources and men?
ROGER FEDERER: I don’t know the numbers. Really, you can always do more. It’s like I can always train more. There’s always more you can do. So a story like this is only going to increase the pressure. Hopefully there’s more funding to it. That’s about it. Same as doping. Yes, absolutely, got to be super aggressive in both areas, no doubt about it.

You’ve always called for a level playing field in tennis or other sports. But still perception is so important. How can tennis ask players not to be involved in gambling and yet take one sponsorship deal after another and have big signage promoting betting companies at events?
ROGER FEDERER: Yeah, I mean, I don’t know. It’s a tough one, you know, to talk about one or the other. In some ways they’re connected. In some ways they’re not connected at all. It depends on how you really look at it.

Betting happens all across the world in all the sports. The players just need to know, we need to make sure the integrity of the game is always maintained because without that, I always would say, why do you come and watch this match tonight or any match, because you just don’t know the outcome. As long as we don’t know the outcome, the players, fans, it’s going to be exciting. The moment that gets taken away, there’s no point anymore to be in the stadium.

That’s why it’s super important to keep it clean. In terms of having sponsors around there, I guess there is a lot of money there. Maybe, who knows, could it be helpful maybe? I don’t know. This is a question for more people in suits than a guy in a track suit, I don’t know.

If you got wind of someone you knew was offered or fixing matches, would you tell the authorities straightaway?
ROGER FEDERER: Yeah, I mean, well, I guess so. It’s important that person, how he’s been approached. He needs to feel he’s been supported by the tour, or whatever the governing body is, that there’s a place he can go and speak about it. It’s uncomfortable, not a fun thing. It’s not like, Oh, I’ve just been approached, it’s all cool, and we don’t talk about it.

I think it’s really important that you get supported and get also told how to manage that. So, yes, I guess I would encourage that person to go and say something, otherwise I would say something or I would encourage us to go together or whatever. I would be very helpful in this situation because it’s a very tricky situation to be in.

Is there anything inside the ATP that talks to younger players, older players, that gives advice on how to deal with people who approach them about match fixing?
ROGER FEDERER: You have the ATP University I went to. It was a three-day training thing. I had it in Monaco back in the day. I know they still have it at the end of the year. There was a time they stopped doing it. They were more handing out CDs and explaining everything. It was about everything: how you handle the press, how you handle financially maybe down the road, your fitness, the tour in general. They explain how things are done. Then part of that definitely today is this one as well, the doping issues as well. It’s just like with the whereabouts you, how important, how serious it is. They educate you there.

So I’m sure match fixing is also a priority in those meetings. All the guys that came up, I don’t know exactly the age, like the first to break into the top 100 maybe, or you’re close to that, you get asked to do it. You have to come and show up at the end of the year, which is a great thing. I wasn’t in favor of them handing out CDs because that just ends up being in a drawer at home. They’re taking it serious again like they did with me back in the day.

Honestly, for me it was very helpful to be there. I wasn’t happy to go there in the first place, but I made friends there. I felt supported by the tour. I learned things. For me it was more about the press, how to handle that, to see the press as an intermediary from us to the fans rather than looking at the press as the bad guy.

For me it was very educational. I hope it’s the same thing for the young guys coming up.

When you’re not top 100 or 150, it’s tough to stay alive on the circuit without finding other ways. That’s probably the reason why, even if we wouldn’t accept, it happens. Don’t you think the problem should be to find some more money for those people who are not top 100? Challengers, minor tournaments, it’s there where they try to fix.
ROGER FEDERER: I completely disagree with you. I think you don’t understand. It doesn’t matter how much money you pump into the system, there’s always going to be people approaching players, or people, any sport. It’s all a question of money, you know.

It doesn’t maybe happen at the challengers. It’s going to happen at the futures. It’s going to go away if you offer $1 million for every player to play at every tournament? It’s not going to change a thing.

Still might be approached. That’s why I think you’re wrong there, that more money there is going to solve the issue completely.

I agree we should have more money at futures, challengers, all these levels. But it’s not going to solve the issue. The issue is elsewhere, in the player’s mind.

Among the allegations in the report was some of the suspected match fixers were Grand Slam singles and doubles players. Is it surprising, that element, that they’re saying Grand Slam champions are being involved?
ROGER FEDERER: I mean, it’s like who, what. It’s like thrown around. It’s so easy to do that.

I would like to hear the name. I would love to hear names. Then at least it’s concrete stuff and you can actually debate about it. Was it the player? Was it the support team? Who was it? Was it before? Was it a doubles player, a singles player? Which slam? It’s so all over the place. It’s nonsense to answer something that is pure speculation.

Like I said, it’s super serious and it’s super important to maintain the integrity of our sport. So how high up does it go? The higher it goes, the more surprised I would be, no doubt about it. Not about people being approached, but just people doing it in general. I just think there’s no place at all for these kind of behaviors and things in our sport. I have no sympathy for those people.

 

Today there are a lot of discussions and debates about this match fixing story that came out. Of course, people like you who are top 100 or 10 or so were never in the position to survive getting fixed matches. What do you think? Do you think it exists at the minor level, when someone has to stay from 120 to 180 for five, six years, having to pay maybe a coach, transportation?
MARIA SHARAPOVA: Yeah, honestly, I really hope not. I mean, to me the sport itself has always meant a lot more than money. I know that the more successful you are and the more matches you win, the more prize money, the more money you will receive.

But ultimately that’s never been my personal driving factor in the sport. There’s just so much more on the line. There’s the competitiveness. There’s the challenge of being better. There’s playing in front of thousands of people, playing you against somebody across the net and you trying to win that match.

When you’re out there, it’s not about money.

 

Maria Sharapova

Maria Sharapova

What I’m asking is, when you are not a player of your standard, playing in front of thousands of people.
MARIA SHARAPOVA: I don’t think it really matters what level you are. The sport itself is meaningful. It’s our career. It’s our job. I mean, I guess I can only speak for myself, but we want to succeed at it by improving, by getting better, by beating our own best, and not by anything else.

That’s how I would hope everyone else would think, as well. Make it a better and more competitive sport.

We have the situation where tennis, to its great credit, asks players at all levels not to be involved in gambling. Yet our leading organizations go out and get their own money, so to speak, but getting sponsorships from Betway and other companies. Players aren’t willing to say that’s a bad thing.
MARIA SHARAPOVA: I personally don’t understand that. It’s not that I’m for or against it. As you know, I’ve had many great opportunities to work with great brands in my career. That’s just not a direction that I’ve ever followed. I don’t even know if I’ve had the chance, because I know my management would shut that down very fast. It’s so far away from any of my interests, everything I want to be a part of and the people I want to work with. It has to be true and real. That’s just not something I would ever associate myself with.

My question is, with all respect, do you think in terms of the sporting public out there, do you think it’s a problem to have signage and sponsors that say betting?
MARIA SHARAPOVA: I’m not in their seat. I’m not in the organization’s seat. It’s tough for me to speak about it.

 

Sam Stosur

Q. The match fixing allegations, Novak said his team historically had been approached to throw a match. Have you ever been?
SAMANTHA STOSUR: Never been asked. Never heard of anyone being asked. Don’t know anything about it.

Related Article:

Media Statement From Tennis’ Governing Bodies in Reaction to BBC and BuzzFeed News’s Report on Match Fixing

 

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Media Statement From Tennis’ Governing Bodies in Reaction to BBC and BuzzFeed News’s Report on Match Fixing

tiu

(January 18, 2016) The Tennis Integrity Unit along with tennis’ governing bodies the ITF, ATP, WTA and Grand Slam Board, has issued a statement in reaction to a report by BBC and BuzzFeed News about match fixing in tennis.

The article says without naming names that 16 players who have been ranked in the top 50 have been flagged to the integrity unit, but were allowed to keep playing.

The Tennis Integrity Unit was formed in 2008 as a joint collaboration of the ITF, the ATP, the WTA and the Grand Slam Board.

At a news conference at the Australian Open, which began on Monday in Melbourne, ATP chairman Chris Kermode said “absolutely reject any suggestion that evidence of match-fixing has been suppressed for any reason, or isn’t being investigated.”

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE 18 January, 2016 AEST  

Tennis rejects suggestion evidence of match fixing suppressed

 The Tennis Integrity Unit and the tennis authorities absolutely reject any suggestion that evidence of match fixing has been suppressed for any reason

 In its investigations the Tennis Integrity Unit has to find evidence as opposed to information, suspicion or hearsay

 A year-long investigation into the Sopot match in 2007 found insufficient evidence. As the BuzzFeed report states: “the investigators had hit a brick wall. It just wasn’t possible to determine who the guilty party was in relation to this match”  All professional players, support staff and officials are subject to the Tennis Anti-Corruption Program  Tennis Integrity Unit-instigated anti-corruption investigations have resulted in 18 successful disciplinary cases including five players and one official who have been banned from the sport for life.

In response to match fixing allegations aired on BBC News and BuzzFeed online, the four governing bodies of tennis (ATP, WTA, Grand Slam Board, ITF) who are partners in the Tennis Integrity Unit (TIU), said today that there is a zero-tolerance approach to all aspects of corruption and that they are and will continue to be firmly committed to protecting the integrity of the sport.

Speaking on behalf of the partners, Chris Kermode, Executive Chairman of the ATP and Tennis Integrity Board member, said: “Tennis remains fully committed to meeting the challenge that all sports face from corrupt betting practices. We have stringent procedures and sanctions in place to deal with any suspected corruption and have shown we will act decisively when our integrity rules are broken.

“No player or official is immune from investigation, regardless of their status or position in the sport. Investigations follow where evidence leads” Mr Kermode said.

“All professional players, support staff and officials are subject to the terms of the Tennis AntiCorruption Program (TACP) which equips the TIU with substantial investigative powers. These include the right to interview any relevant person of interest and obtain their telephone, computer and bank records.

“No player or official is ever cleared by the TIU of potential involvement in corruption. By its very nature, corruption is difficult to prove, so while the process can often be lengthy, the TIU will continue to pursue evidence where it believes it is warranted.”

In 2011 the TIU opened an investigation into a player that was subsequently placed on-hold for lack of substantive evidence. When new evidence was obtained in 2013, the player was charged and found guilty of three breaches of the TACP. He was suspended for a period of

five years and fined US$25,000. A subsequent appeal to the Court for Arbitration in Sport (CAS) in early 2014 was dismissed and the original sanction upheld.

“For four years the TIU continued to pursue this case; time and effort that was vindicated by removing a corrupt player from the game for a substantial period of time” Mr. Kermode said.

“We remain open and willing to upgrade any or all of the anti-corruption systems we have in place if we need to.”

In September 2008 the four tennis associations came together to streamline and strengthen corruption investigations becoming one of the first major sports to establish its own dedicated anti-corruption unit. The Tennis Investigation Unit is charged with enforcing the sport’s zerotolerance policy towards gambling-related corruption worldwide.

Since 2010, TIU-instigated anti-corruption investigations have resulted in 18 successful disciplinary cases being brought forward.

These prosecutions include five players and one official who have been banned from the sport for life.

Each of the 18 cases was a result of TIU-instigated investigations, rather than law enforcement or judicial prosecutions, or sting or entrapment operations.

Where cases have been appealed by players to the Court for Arbitration in Sport, the original period of suspension handed down by an independent Anti-Corruption Hearing Officer has been upheld. This reinforces the robustness of the original investigation and the strength of evidence gathered by TIU.

The TIU online anti-corruption player education program is mandatory and has been completed by more than 23,000 professional players.

“There are nearly 21,000 active professional players and over 2,100 officials, playing and officiating in over 1,500 tournaments in 80 countries around the world. The vast majority of these individuals are good people of high integrity,” Mr Kermode said.

“Unfortunately, there is always a minority who seek personal gain from corrupt activity. Those individuals will continue to be subject to investigation by the TIU and disciplinary sanctions which include lifetime bans and punitive financial penalties.”

Background:

Environmental review of integrity in professional tennis In 2008, the governing bodies of tennis commissioned an independent investigation by two leading experts into the integrity of the sport. As part of their review they examined 73 matches:  Carrying out a detailed analysis of betting records;  Overlaying the betting spread sheet over the umpire’s score sheet to take account of betting during play;  Interviewing players, officials and witnesses;  Examining telephone records and forensically examining handsets;  Analysing telephone records when received (not straightforward as usually foreign service providers); and  Interviewing account holders involved in the suspicious betting patterns.

The report, published in May 2008, found that professional tennis is not institutionally or systematically corrupt. However, there were intelligence indications that some players are vulnerable to corrupt approaches and there are people outside tennis who seek to corrupt those within the sport.

The report made 15 recommendations including the creation of an Integrity Unit.

http://www.sportingintelligence.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/01/Integrity-intennis.pdf

Tennis Integrity Unit In September 2008 the Tennis Integrity Unit (TIU) was formed as a joint initiative of the Association of Tennis Professionals (ATP), the Women’s Tennis Association (WTA), the Grand Slam Board and the International Tennis Federation (ITF).

Currently under the leadership of Director of Integrity Nigel Willerton, a former senior detective with the Metropolitan Police in London, the Unit has a global brief to protect the sport from all forms of betting-related corrupt practices.

The TIU works on a confidential basis and makes no public comment on its work other than to confirm the outcome of an investigation that results in disciplinary action being taken. It is operationally independent from the governing bodies of tennis and works on a global basis from its base in London. In protecting the integrity of world tennis it has a remit that covers:

 Prevention: Working closely with Governing Bodies and Tournament Directors to implement integrity protocols designed to restrict unauthorised access to players and maintain their privacy. Preventing corruption from taking place includes identification of would-be corruptors targeting players, coaches, officials or others with potential influence.

 Education: Explaining the tactics and approaches used by potential corruptors forms part of the TIU’s education program for players and support staff. All players are made aware of these risks and the responses required under the terms of the Tennis Anti-Corruption Program. Protecting innocent players from unfounded and malicious allegations of corrupt practice is another important role.

 Investigation: The TIU has a range of investigative powers that it can bring to bear in any matter of concern that it identifies or that is brought to its attention. Investigation can include any of the following elements:

– Analysis of betting data and patterns. The Unit works closely with reputable betting organisations to access, investigate and verify data. – Interviews with any person implicated in allegations. – Production of records from any person covered by the Tennis Anti-Corruption Program.

The TIU can launch an investigation at any time at its own discretion. To maintain the confidentiality requirements of the Tennis Anti-Corruption Program, the Unit does not announce, comment on or confirm any of its investigative activities. The only time public comment is made is after a Hearing has taken place and there has been a finding against a player or other person under the Tennis Anti-Corruption Program.

 Disciplinary sanctions: sanctions for proven breaches of the Anti-Corruption Program are delivered by nominated Anti-Corruption Hearing Officers appointed by the sport’s Governing Bodies. Depending on the seriousness of the breach, player sanctions can include: – US$250,000 fine plus an amount equal to the value of any winnings or other amounts received in connection with the offence. – A lifetime ban from participating in any event organised or sanctioned by any tennis Governing Body. Penalties can be subject to appeal to the Court of Arbitration for Sport in Lausanne, Switzerland.

http://www.tennisintegrityunit.com/

Tennis Anti-Corruption Program The purpose of the Tennis Anti-Corruption Program is to: (i) Maintain the integrity of tennis; (ii) Protect against any efforts to impact improperly the results of any match; and (iii) Establish a uniform rule and consistent scheme of enforcement and sanctions applicable to all professional tennis Events and to all Governing Bodies

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ITF Appoints Mary Pierce and Mark Woodforde to Board of Directors

itf

(December 21, 2015) The ITF announced  that Mary Pierce (FRA) and Mark Woodforde (AUS) have been appointed by the ITF Board to four-year terms as athlete members of the ITF Board of Directors, subject to ratification by the ITF Annual General Meeting in June 2016. Pierce and Woodforde will join the other 13 Board members alongside President David Haggerty.

 

The ITF AGM in Santiago, Chile last year approved this change to the ITF Constitution mandating athlete representation on the ITF Board. The AGM agreed that two former players (one man and one woman) would be appointed by the Board for four-year terms to help the ITF have a better understanding of the players and their importance to tennis.

 

ITF President David Haggerty said: “After an intensive process where we talked with many talented athletes, I am pleased to announce that the ITF Board of Directors has appointed Mary Pierce and Mark Woodforde for four-year terms. They are the first athlete members of the ITF Board and will provide good insight into the needs of the players and help us to grow the game of tennis around the world. Their perspective and collaboration is very important to the ITF as we work to keep tennis strong and vibrant. Both Mary and Mark will also lead the ITF’s Athlete Commission and will be members of the ITF Olympic Committee.”

 

Mary Pierce, aged 40, was ranked as high as No. 3 on the WTA rankings, won two Grand Slam singles titles at the 1995 Australian Open and 2000 Roland Garros, and reached the final at the 2005 US Open. She reached the quarterfinals at the 2004 Olympic Tennis Event in Athens, and represented her country in Fed Cup by BNP Paribas in 22 ties over ten years, playing on two winning teams in 1997 and 2003. Since her retirement from tennis in 2006, she has worked as a coach and commentator, helped junior players in Africa, sponsors two ITF Pro Circuit tournaments in Mauritius, and participated in the ITF’s Worldwide Coaches Conference.

 

Pierce said: “I am very proud and honoured to join the ITF Board. I am convinced that their role in the tennis world is crucial, and I will do my best to bring as much as I can to their action. Thank you so much for welcoming me.”

 

Mark Woodforde, aged 50, was ranked as high as No. 19 in singles and No. 1 in doubles on the ATP rankings. He won twelve Grand Slam doubles titles, eleven with long term partner Todd Woodbridge and one with John McEnroe, and was also a singles semifinalist at the 1996 Australian Open. Partnering Woodbridge, he won the gold medal in doubles at the 1996 Olympic Tennis Event in Atlanta and a silver medal at the 2000 Olympic Tennis Event in Sydney. He represented Australia 24 times over ten years in Davis Cup by BNP Paribas, played in three Finals and was part of the 1999 winning team. With Woodbridge, he holds the record for the best Davis Cup doubles team in Australia’s history. The Woodies were inducted into the International Tennis Hall of Fame and the Australian Tennis Hall of Fame in 2010 and received the Philippe Chatrier Award, the ITF’s highest honour in 2014. Since retiring from tennis in 2000, he has worked as a coach, tournament director and commentator.

 

Woodforde said: “It’s exciting to be appointed to the ITF Board of Directors. “Some of the proudest accomplishments of my career came when I played for my country in Davis Cup and the Olympic Games and was able to see at first hand the work of the ITF. My life continues to be centred around tennis as a commentator and coach. I think that this gives me both insight and perspective on the views of the players that I can share with the Board as we work together to grow tennis around the world.”

 

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Davis Cup Final Will Still Take Place Next Week

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(November 17, 2015) Despite concerns following the Paris attacks, the Davis Cup final between Belgium and Great Britain will go ahead as planned in Ghent, Belgium said the International Tennis Federation.

The Davis Cup final will be held in the Flanders Expo November 27-29.

Great Britain and Belgium named their teams. Great Britain’s team, led by Captain Leon Smith will consist of Andy Murray, Kyle Edmund, Jamie Murray and Dominic Inglot.

“Our GB Davis Cup team is proud to be competing in the Final in Ghent this year,” said Smith. “It is an historic ‎moment in British Tennis and I’m delighted to name these five players for the tie against Belgium. Andy has led from the front throughout this campaign, showing time and again what it means to him to pull on the GB jersey. He shows determination, commitment and passion that inspires the other British players on the bench and our fantastic fans in the stands.

 

The team has had some incredible results this year, and we know that off the back of defeating the three other Grand Slam nations we carry great momentum going into the final, however we will ‎not underestimate the challenge in front of us. The Belgian team is full of top 100 talent and they will push us all the way.

 

“While our team will be spearheaded by Andy, the other guys give us strong options in both the singles and the doubles positions. Jamie is having an outstanding year and is firmly established as a top 10 world ranked doubles player‎. He has played a key part in our ties this year with vital wins against both France and Australia partnering Andy.

 

“Dom is playing some of the best tennis of his career having reached the semi-finals of the US Open and recently the semi-finals of the Paris Masters Series. He played an outstanding Davis Cup match earlier in the year with Jamie against the Bryan brothers, narrowly losing the fifth set. In James Ward, we have a player who really gets the Davis Cup and has had several big wins over the last few years against top 100 players in this competition. Kyle Edmund has had a very good year on the tour, breaking top 100 for the first time and qualifying at both Australian and French Open.

 

“The support from our fans has been unbelievable. There is no other word for it. For those making the trip to Belgium it will be more important than ever that they make as much noise as possible and get behind the team”

Belgium will field David Goffin, Steve Darcis, Ruben Bemelmans and Kimmer Coppejans. Johan van Herck is the captain of the Belgian team.

The Draw for the Final will take place on Thursday 26 November at 14:00 local time (13:00 GMT). Both nations came make up to two nomination changes up until one hour before the draw.

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Davis Cup Results: Barbados, Slovenia and Sweden Remain in Zone Group I in 2016

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(November 1, 2015) The ITF has announced the final results for the three Davis Cup by BNP Paribas Zone Group I second round play-off ties taking place on 30 October-1 November.

 

Barbados, Slovenia and Sweden will all remain in Zone Group I in 2016, while Denmark, Lithuania and Uruguay have all been relegated to 2016 Zone Group II.

 

The draw for the 2016 Davis Cup by BNP Paribas Americas Zone Group II and Europe/Africa Zone Group II will be held at the ITF offices in London at 10:00 GMT on Tuesday 3 November. The seeds will be based on the new ITF Davis Cup Nations Ranking of 2 November

 

 

AMERICAS ZONE GROUP I SECOND ROUND PLAY-OFF

 

BARBADOS defeated URUGUAY 3-2

Venue:  National Tennis Centre, St. Michael, BAR (hard – outdoor)

 

Santiago Maresca (URU) d. Seanon Williams (BAR) 62 62 61
Darian King (BAR) d. Rodrigo Arus (URU) 61 63 36 61
Darian King/Haydn Lewis (BAR) d. Rodrigo Arus/Santiago Maresca (URU) 62 62 62
Darian King (BAR) d. Santiago Maresca (URU) 76(6) 62 60
Nicolas Xiviller (URU) d. Russell Moseley (BAR) 61 64

 

EUROPE/AFRICA ZONE GROUP I SECOND ROUND PLAY-OFF

 

SWEDEN defeated DENMARK 3-2

Venue: Antvorskovhallen, Slagelse, DEN (hard – indoor)
Markus Eriksson (SWE) d. Andreas Bjerrehus (DEN) 67(5) 67(5) 76(3) 76(3) 97
Mikael Ymer (SWE) d. Frederik Nielsen (DEN) 75 63 64
Thomas Kromann/Frederik Nielsen (DEN) d. Johan Brunstrom/Fred Simonsson (SWE) 67(3) 62 76(5) 76(9)
Frederik Nielsen (DEN) d. Markus Eriksson (SWE) 62 76(2) 76(8)
Mikael Ymer (SWE) d. Christian Sigsgaard (DEN) 64 60 36 57 62

 

SLOVENIA defeated LITHUANIA 5-0

Venue: Teniski Klub Triglav Kranj, Kranj, SLO (hard – indoor)
Grega Zemlja (SLO) d. Ricardas Berankis (LTU) 63 75 62
Blaz Rola (SLO) d. Laurynas Grigelis (LTU) 76(6) 62 62
Blaz Kavcic/Blaz Rola (SLO) d. Laurynas Grigelis/Lukas Mugevicius (LTU) 64 76(1) 64
Blaz Rola (SLO) d. Lukas Mugevicius (LTU) 62 62
Tom Kocevar-Desman (SLO) d. Tadas Babelis (LTU) 62 26 64

 

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Czechs Win Junior Fed Cup and Canadians Claim Junior Davis Cup Titles

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(October 4, 2015) The top seeds took home the Junior Davis Cup and Junior Fed Cup finals on Sunday in Madrid’s La Caja Magica on Sunday.

Canada won the Junior Davis Cup title over Germany, while the Czech Republic was victorious over the United States.

For Canada this was the first Junior Davis Cup title in its history. The No. 1 seeds at Junior Davis Cup, with Junior US Open champions Felix Auger-Aliassime and Denis Shapovalov capturing the deciding doubles match to earn the win 2-1.

“It was an unbelievable final,” said Auger-Aliassime after the match to Tennis Canada. “We had to clinch it in the deciding doubles but I think we did a great job. The support on the sidelines was amazing. We are really proud of what we did here.”

“It’s very exciting being the first Canadians to ever win Junior Davis Cup,” said Shapovalov. “We knew we had the team to do it as all three of the players on this team are great and contributed. We are very excited.”

Prior to this year, the best finish by a Canadian Junior Davis Cup or Fed Cup team was second place – 2011, 2004, 2003 (Junior Fed Cup) and 2010 (Junior Davis Cup).

On the ladies side, the Czech Republic also won 2-1. It’s their fourth Fed Cup title, first since 2001.

A total of 168 teams from 94 countries took part in regional qualifying in 2015, with 15 boys and 15 girls teams joining hosts Spain in the Finals.

The final positions of all the nations Courtesy of the ITF:

Junior Davis Cup – 1. Canada 2. Germany 3. Russia 4. Japan 5. Australia 6. Argentina 7. USA 8. Czech Republic 9. Poland 10. Colombia 11. Brazil 12. Chinese Taipei 13. Spain 14. Sweden 15. South Africa 16. Hong Kong, China

 

Junior Fed Cup – 1. Czech Republic 2. USA 3. Canada 4. Russia 5. Australia 6. Spain 7. Italy 8. Japan 9. Brazil 10. Great Britain 11. New Zealand 12. Argentina 13. Colombia 14. Chinese Taipei 15. Netherlands 16. Egypt

Girls Final

 

CZECH REPUBLIC (1) defeated USA (2) 2-1:
Kayla Day (USA) d. Monika Kilnarova (CZE) 63 61
Marketa Vondrousova (CZE) d. Claire Liu (USA) 75 64
Anna Slovakova/Marketa Vondrousova (CZE) d. Kayla Day/Claire Liu (USA) 60 62

Girls 3rd-4th place play-offs

 

CANADA (4) defeated RUSSIA (3) 3-0:
Bianca Andreescu (CAN) d. Evgeniya Levashova (RUS) 62 62
Charlotte Robillard-Millette (CAN) d. Olesya Pervushina (RUS) 63 75
Bianca Andreescu/Vanessa Wong (CAN) d. Evgeniya Levashova/Elena Rybakina (RUS) 61 36 63

Girls 13th-14th place play-offs

 

COLOMBIA defeated CHINESE TAIPEI 2-1:

Wu Fang Hsien (TPE) d. Sofia Munera (COL) 63 46 61
Emiliana Arango (COL) d. Lee Yang (TPE) 62 62
Emiliana Arango/Sofia Munera (COL) d. Chen Pei Hsuan/Wu Fang Hsien (TPE) 63 64

Girls 15th-16th place play-offs

 

NETHERLANDS defeated EGYPT 2-1:
Suzan Lamens (NED) d. Laila Elnimr (EGY) 36 76(2) 60
Isolde de Jong (NED) d. Dalila Said (EGY) 62 62
Laila Elnimr/Dalila Said (EGY) d. Merel Hoedt/Isolde de Jong (NED) 76(5) 64

 

Boys Final

CANADA (1) defeated GERMANY (5) 2-1:
Denis Shapovalov (CAN) d. Marvin Moeller (GER) 61 64
Nicola Kuhn (GER) d. Felix Auger-Aliassime (CAN) 63 63
Felix Auger-Aliassime/Denis Shapovalov (CAN) d. Nicola Kuhn/Marvin Moeller (GER) 63 36 62

 

Boys 3rd-4th place play-offs

RUSSIA (4) defeated JAPAN (8) 3-0:
Alen Avidzba (RUS) d. Yunosuke Tanaka (JPN) 64 62
Artem Dubrivnyy (RUS) d. Toru Horie (JPN) 63 60
Alen Avidzba/Mikhail Sokolovskiy d. Yuta Shimizu/Yunosuke Tanaka (JPN) 62 64

 

Boys 13th-14th place play-offs

SPAIN defeated SWEDEN 3-0:
Andres Fernandez Canovas (ESP) d. Linus Bergevi (SWE) 64 64
Nikolas Sanchez-Izquierdo Vivar (ESP) d. Jonas Eriksson Ziverts (SWE) 16 75 62
Alejandro Davidovich Fukina/Nikolas Sanchez-Izquierdo Vivar (ESP) d. Jonas Eriksson Ziverts/Karl Friberg (SWE) 67(5) 61 62

 

Boys 15th-16th place play-offs

SOUTH AFRICA defeated HONG KONG, CHINA 2-1:
Albertus Kruger (RSA) d. Sou Ming Chun Alan (HKG) 63 61
Richard Thongoana (RSA) d. Lam Ching (HKG) 63 62
Cheung Ngai Long/Sou Ming Chun Alan (HKG) d. Joshua Howard-Tripp/Richard Thongoana (RSA) 62 61

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USTA President Katrina Adams Among Newly Named ITF Vice Presidents

Katrina Adams

Katrina Adams

(September 26, 2015) Katrina Adams (USA), Anil Khanna (IND) and Rene Stammbach (SUI) have today been named as ITF Vice Presidents under new ITF President David Haggerty. The decision was taken on Saturday at the first meeting of the new ITF Board of Directors in Santiago, Chile.

 

ITF President David Haggerty said: “The selection of Vice Presidents reflects the diversity on the new board, and the experience of these board members. The whole ITF Board is committed to working together over the next four years to enable the continued growth of the organisation.”

 

The full line-up of the ITF Board of Directors for the term 2015-19 is as follows:

 

President

 

David Haggerty (USA)

 

Vice Presidents

 

Katrina Adams (USA)

Anil Khanna (IND)

Rene Stammbach (SUI)

 

Board members

 

Martin Corrie (GBR)

Sergio Elias (CHI)

Ismail El Shafei (EGY)

Bernard Giudicelli (FRA)

Jack Graham (CAN)

Thomas Koenigsfeldt (DEN)

Celia Patrick (NZL)

Aleksei Selivanenko (RUS)

Stefan Tzvetkov (BUL)

Bulat Utemuratov (KAZ)

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Former USTA President David Haggerty Elected ITF President

January 12, 2012- CTDW Leadership - David A. Haggerty

January 12, 2012- CTDW Leadership – David A. Haggerty

From the ITF: (September 25, 2015) David Haggerty was elected ITF President at the ITF Annual General Meeting in Santiago, Chile on Friday. The 58-year old from the United States succeeds Francesco Ricci Bitti, whose 16-year term as ITF President ends today. Haggerty will serve a four-year term from 2015-19.

 

Haggerty was elected on the second ballot with 200 votes, over Anil Khanna (IND) with 192 votes. Rene Stammbach (SUI) and Juan Margets (ESP) were eliminated on the first ballot.

 

Haggerty is an experienced tennis administrator, having held a variety of roles within the United States Tennis Association (USTA) since 2001 and within the ITF since 2009. He served as Chairman, CEO and President of the USTA in 2013-14, and was a Vice President on the ITF Board of Directors in 2013-15. He is a former President of the Tennis Industry Association and a current board member of the International Tennis Hall of Fame.

 

Away from tennis administration, Haggerty had a 30-year career in the racket industry, and is a former Chairman of Head USA, President of Penn Racquet Sports, and President of Dunlop Maxfli Slazenger Sports.

 

Outgoing president Francesco Ricci Bitti said: “I would like to congratulate David Haggerty on his election as ITF President, and wish him all the best for the future. It has been my pleasure to serve as President for the last 16 years, and I am confident that under David’s leadership, the organisation can continue to grow with the support of the ITF staff and our 210 member nations.”

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