2014/04/17

Tennis News & Net Notes

Novak Djokovic hires a new head coach, Boris Becker: “He is a true legend, someone who has great tennis knowledge and his experience will help me win new trophies from the Grand Slams and other tournaments,” Djokovic said in a statement. via USA Today

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Jerzy Janowicz pulls out of Hopman Cup: The top ranked Pole cites foot injury and hopes to be well for Australian Open. via The Sydney Morning Herald

ITF Announces 2013 World Champions: Serena Williams is named Women’s World Champion for the fourth time, while this is the third successive year that Novak Djokovic has received the honour. via ITF Tennis

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Teams Named for 2014 Hopman Cup

 

(October 8, 2013) The official draw, teams and provisional schedule have been set for the mixed teams event,  the Hyundai Hopman Cup in Perth, Australia. The event will be held from December 28, 2013 through January 4, 2014.

 

     

 

   
  Schedule Time Matches
  Saturday 28 December 10:00 am Poland v Italy
    5:30 pm Canada v Australia
  Sunday 29 December 10:00 am Czech Republic v Spain
    5:30 pm Poland v Canada
  Monday 30 December 10:00 am USA v Spain
    5:30 pm France v Czech Republic
  Tuesday 31 December 10:00 am Italy v Australia
  Wednesday 1 January 5:30 pm USA v France
  Thursday 2 January 10:00 am Italy v Canada
    5:30 pm Poland v Australia
  Friday 3 January 10:00 am France v Spain
    5:30 pm Czech Republic v USA
  Saturday 4 January 5:30 pm Winner Group A v Winner Group B

 

 

Poland                                [15] Jerzy Janowicz and [4] Agnieszka Radwanska

USA                                     [13] John Isner and [12] Sloane Stephens

France                                [9] Jo-Wilfried Tsonga and [27] Alize Cornet

Canada                               [11] Milos Raonic and [35] Eugenie Bouchard

Czech Republic                [39] Radek Stepanek and [7] Petra Kvitova

Italy                                     [22] Andreas Seppi and [31] Flavia Pennetta

Australia                             [51] Bernard Tomic and [20] Sam Stosur

Spain                                   [19] Tommy Robredo and [98] Anabel Medina Garrigues

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Stosur, Tomic, Radwanska and Janowicz to Play Hopman Cup

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Jerzy Janowicz

(August 19, 2013) Australia’s top ranked players Sam Stosur and Bernard Tomic  have confirmed they will play at Hyundai Hopman Cup 2014.

 

Current world No.4 Agnieszka Radwanska and Wimbledon semifinalist Jerzy Janowicz are also set to team up as Poland makes its debut at the event.

 

World No.13 Stosur is excited to return to Western Australia for the first time since 2010.

 

“I just wanted to get back to Perth. I thought this year I’d try something different again,” said Stosur, the 2011 US Open champion.

 

“It will be nice to be able to play. You know that you’re going to get three matches … and maybe that’s going to be good for me going into the Aussie Open.

 

“Hopefully that’s going to be the secret formula to me doing well,” added Stosur.

 

Tomic, 20, and the youngest player currently in the top 100, will pair with Stosur as he looks to continue his unbeaten record at Perth Arena.

 

“I had some success there earlier this year so hopefully I can do well again in 2014,” said the world No.42, who recently reached the fourth round at Wimbledon.

 

“The event always attracts strong teams so you know you’re going to get some tough matches against high quality players.

 

“The local crowds love their tennis and it’s always exciting to play in front of them,” added the Queenslander, who won his first ATP singles title in Sydney in January.

 

Radwanska and Janowicz will be looking to make their mark when Team Poland makes its first ever appearance at the event.

 

“I’m really excited to play the Hopman Cup for the first time,” said Radwanska, who holds 12 WTA singles titles at just 24 years of age.

 

“I’ve never played mixed doubles with him [Jerzy] before.  Actually my last mixed doubles match was I think five years ago so that will be fun for sure.”

 

Twenty-two-year-old Janowicz has climbed up the rankings by 73 places to be just outside the top 10 in the past 12 months.

 

“We decided it might be a lot of fun to play together at Hopman Cup,” said Janowicz.

 

Hyundai Hopman Cup Event Director Steve Ayles is delighted with the signing of the top Australian and Polish pairs.

 

“Sam and Bernie, Australia’s highest ranked players, have committed to play this event, which shows the strength and value of the Hyundai Hopman Cup. The players look at the event as a solid starting point for the new season.

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Rough Day Session for the Seeds in Montreal

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Vasek Pospisil

By Dominique Cambron-Goulet

(August 8) MONTREAL – After the No. 3 player in the world, David Ferrer [3], lost last night 6-2, 6-4 against qualifier Alez Bogomolov Jr., two more seeds Andy Murray [2] and Tomas Berdych [5] lost on Thursday at the Montreal ATP Masters 1000.

Ernests Gulbis

Ernests Gulbis

Murray’s upset came in straight sets against Ernest Gulbis 6-4, 6-3. Murray was broken in the 10th game leaving his opponent with the first set in hand. In the second set, Gulbis broke early and had a 3-0 lead. Murray made the fans believe in a comeback at 3-3, but fell short, losing three straight games. Gulbis said after the match that even if it was a big win, it’s better to keep your expectations really low to stay focused. “You have a good result, you build up a living basically for a couple days in your own dream world. Suddenly it breaks and you’re without confidence. There is no need for that.”

 

Tomas Berdych

Tomas Berdych

Berdych’s upset is on the other hand the story of the day. Canadian Vasek Pospisil continues his great journey through the main draw after ousting John Isner and Radek Stepanek. The winner of the Vancouver ATP 100 tournament just last week relied on his serve (20 aces) to win in three sets 7-5, 2-6, 7-6 (5).

The Montreal crowd was once again incredible. People even sat on the stairs to encourage their local favorite. After the first set, ball boys in the crowd started doing the wave and the fans kept doing it at side changes. The crowd was loud and seemed to disturb the players in some rallies. But Berdych said later in interview: “It’s a nice advantage for him, but I think we need that more because that’s why we play tennis!”

The third set was a story by itself as every point was a matter of life and death for the huge crowd gathered on BN court after Murray’s loss. Pospisil broke in the third game of the set with a winner return on 30-40. As he lead the set, the fans thought everything was possible for the Canadian, but Berdych broke him in an exhausting eighth game. After trailing 0-40, Pospisil came back to deuce but never managed to get a game point and Berdych evened things out.

Berdych was pushed to the tiebreak by Pospisil aces and that’s also what made the Canadian win the ultimate game. Serving at 5-6, the Czech hit an unforced error as the crowd got up screaming. To have my first top-10 win here, in front of that crowd, was extremely emotional. This win is the best of my whole career”, said Pospisil in a news conference.

One crazy play happened during the third set. In the seventh game, Tomas Berdych was called for a time violation and hit an underhand serve as he heard the chair umpire’s call. It was an ace but Chair Umpire Damien Dumusois refused it. “I don’t see a reason why the point doesn’t count, said Berdych in press conference. If there’s an explanation, I’m just going to ask the referees. I have no idea what’s the rule.“

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In other matches

Rafael Nadal [4] came back from breaks in both sets to win against Wimbledon’s semifinalist Jerzy Janowicz [15] 7-6 (6), 6-4.

Benoit Paire was unable to continue to the quarterfinals after eliminating Stanislas Wawrinka [8] on Wednesday. Qualifier Marinko Matosevic defeated him in a close match 7-6 (7), 6-7 (10), 6-3.

Dominique Cambron-Goulet has been teaching tennis for ten years and is now a journalist in Montreal. Follow his reports  all week from Rogers Cup here and live on twitter @TennisNewsTPN.

 

Photographs by Marc-André Gauthier

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At a Topsy-Turvy Wimbledon, Order is Restored with a Novak Djokovic – Andy Murray Final

 

 

Novak Djokovic

(July 5, 2013) During a Wimbledon fortnight which saw the upsets of Rafael Nadal and Roger Federer in the first and second rounds, respectively, chaos has come full circle to become order as No. 1 Novak Djokovic will face No. 2 Andy Murray for The Championships on Sunday.

Djokovic was pushed to five sets to best Juan Martin Del Potro 7-5, 4-6, 7-6 (2), 6-7 (8), 6-3 in a semifinal record 4 hours and 43 minutes.

Del Potro saved two match points in the fourth set tiebreak to extend the match to a fifth set.

“I’ve had some epic matches in my career and some long five‑setters,” said Djokovic.  “Especially the one that stands out is the finals Nadal Australian Open a few years ago.  It went for six hours.”

“But was a really high‑level match during four hours,” Del Potro said.  “He hit so hard the ball.  I think was unbelievable to watch, but, of course, I’m sad because I lost and I was close to beat him.”

“But credit to him,” Djokovic continued, “because he show his fighting spirit.  He came up with from back of the court some amazing flat backhands and forehands that you cannot say anything but congratulate him on that and move on.

“But I managed to hang in there, stay tough, and really glad to win.”

For Djokovic it will be his 11th major final. Djokovic holds 6 majors – 1 Wimbledon, 4 Australian Opens and a U.S. Open title.

Andy Murray was pushed by No. 24 Jerzy Janowicz 6-7 (2), 6-4, 6-4, 6-3 to earn his second straight Wimbledon final.  Murray is trying to become the first man from Great Britain to win Wimbledon since Fred Perry did in back in 1936.

Murray rallied from a 1-4 down in the third set to win the next five games in a row to take the set 6-4. After the third set ended, after 8:30 p.m. the Wimbledon roof was closed. Murray complained to officials about the decision due to the oncoming darkness. Play resumed about 30 minutes after.

Murray quickly jumped on Janowicz’s serve and broke to take a lead in the fourth set which he would not relinquish.

“Such a shame I didn’t play my best tennis today,” Janowicz said.  “I was struggling a little bit with my serve.  Everything basically collapsed after this one point when was 30‑All, third set, 4‑1 for me.  He did the tape.  The ball just roll over.

“But I’m still deep down really happy.  This was my first semifinal in Grand Slam, so tomorrow I’m going to be okay.”

“I think there is some similarities there in terms of if you look at stats and stuff,” Murray said in caparing his game to Djokovic’s.  “I mean, both of us return well.  That’s probably the strongest part of our games.  Both play predominantly from the baseline.

“We both move well, but a different sort of movement.  You know, he’s extremely flexible and he slides into shots ‑ even on the courts here.  He slides more.  He’s quite a bit lighter than me.

“So I’d say I probably move with more power and he’s much more flexible than me.

Murray and Djokovic take Centre Court on Sunday, Djokovic has a 11-7 record against Murray.

 

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Murray Rallies From Two Sets Down; Janowicz wins Battle of Polish Power at Wimbledon

Murray at Olympics

(July 3, 2013) Scotland’s Andy Murray came back from being down two sets to none to stop Spain’s Fernando Verdasco 4-6, 3-6,6-1, 6-4, 7-5 to move into the semifinals of Wimbledon. In the quarterfinal between two Polish players, No. 24 Jerzy Janowicz defeated Lukasz Kubot 7-5, 6-4, 6-4 to become the first Polish male semifinalist at Wimbledon.

Murray will face Janowicz in the semifinals on Friday.

What looked like a straightforward match on paper against No. 54 Verdasco was a struggle on Centre Court for the No. 2 Murray who is trying to be the first man from Great Britain since Fred Perry in 1936 to win The Championships.

Verdasco’s steady and powerful serving kept Murray off his game in the first two sets. Murray made his was back into the match, easily capturing the third set 6-1. In the sixth game of the fourth set, Murray survived two breakpoints and broke Verdasco three games later and served out the fourth set 6-4.

This was Murray’s second time rallying from two sets down at Wimbledon. He did it back in 2008 against Richard Gasquet.

“Like I was playing there, the more times you’re in those positions and the more times you can come back, you understand the way you need to think and the way you need to sort of negotiate your way through the last few sets,” Murray told media.

”Did a good job with that.  You know, sometimes it can be easy to get back to two sets all.  The fifth set, the final set, often the guy who won the first two comes back and wins that one.  It’s normally the toughest set of the three to win.

“I was expecting it to be tough and hung in well.”

After Janowicz beat his countryman, both men hugged each other and exchanged shirts as soccer players do.

“Right now I’m the most happy person in the world,” Janowicz said of making his first major semifinal.  “I made semifinal of Grand Slam, my best result ever.  Also I have in my mind last year Paris Bercy.  I was there in the final.”

Janowicz said of playing Andy Murray “I hope Andy will feel some kind of pressure. I’m sure he’ll feel some kind of pressure because Great Britain is waiting for the English champion in Wimbledon.”

“It will be a very tough match,” Murray said about his opponent his semifinal.  “He has a big serve.  He’s a big guy with a lot of power.  He also has pretty good touch.  He likes to hit dropshots.  He doesn’t just whack every single shot as hard as he can.

“It will be a very tough match.  He’s played extremely well here, I think.  He had a tough match in the last round against Melzer, but apart from that he’s been pretty convincing.  He’s a tough player.”

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Bellucci Beats Janowicz in Raucous Match in Miami

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By Amy Fetherolf

(March 23, 2013) MIAMI — In a match where crowd involvement surpassed the tennis for entertainment, world No. 40 Thomaz Bellucci upset world No. 24 Jerzy Janowicz, 7-6(5), 3-6, 6-3 in the second round of Miami.

The crowd was heavily behind the Brazilian, and it immediately became clear that dealing with the atmosphere would be a struggle for Janowicz.

Janowicz charged to a 3-1 lead in the first set, but Bellucci was able to break Janowicz and force a tiebreak, which he won, 7-5.

During the first set, scattered Janowicz fans began chanting during the changeovers, and the pro-Bellucci crowd responded by booing and whistling. Each time Janowicz stepped to the line to serve, the tennis crowd chanted “Vamos quebrar!” (“Let’s break.”) A few rowdy fans called out their own line calls and time violations. Chair Umpire Kader Nouni tried meekly several times to quiet the crowd, but the unruliness continued to escalate.

As Janowicz served to force a first set tiebreak, the crowd began to boo and whistle. He threw his arms up in the air, encouraging the crowd to boo louder. They were happy to oblige. They booed him enthusiastically again when he paused to tie his shoes between points. His pleas to Nouni to calm the crowd went unanswered.

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Janowicz racked up 31 unforced errors to Bellucci’s 12 in the first set.

The match stayed tight for six games in the second set, but Bellucci double faulted twice to hand Janowicz the break for 5-3, and failed to convert on an 0-30 opportunity as Janowicz served it out.

Janowicz continued to fire up the crowd, giving them a thumbs down during one of the changeovers as they booed him, and laughing at the reaction he got.

The third set was one-way traffic for Bellucci, even though he paused to receive treatment from the trainer for a gluteal injury. He held from 15-40 down, and Janowicz spit on the court in frustration.

Meanwhile, the crowd’s rancor was growing exponentially. A man sitting directly behind Janowicz’s coach began yelling and chanting, “Go home, Polska.” Nouni did not intervene, perhaps having given up on controlling the crowd. Janowicz laughed through the last changeover.

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Bellucci served out the match successfully, much to the crowd’s delight. Janowicz bolted for the exit immediately, chased by a trail of boos, whistles, and jeers.

“He’s already lost. Let him be,” Janowicz’s coach said to the man behind him who was chanting for Janowicz to go home.

For Bellucci’s part, the match atmosphere was nothing he wasn’t used to.

“Maybe Janowicz had some distractions, but for me, I’m used to playing like that,” Bellucci said. “When we play in Davis Cup in Brazil, it’s always like that. The crowd is very loud. Maybe for the other player was not so good.”

“It was very special to be on court with a Brazilian crowd. The crowd was full of Brazilians. Very happy to have this victory. I hope to play well in the next round.”

Bellucci will play Andreas Seppi next.

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Amy Fetherolf‏ is covering the Sony Open as media for Tennis Panorama News (@TennisNewsTPN). She is a co-founder of The Changeover. Follow her on Twitter at @AmyFetherolf.

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Third Time’s the Charm: Bryan Brothers Capture First Doubles Championship in the Desert

By Jennifer Knapp

Bryan Brothers

(March 17, 2013) – Top seeds Bob Bryan and Mike Bryan of the U.S. won their first BNP Paribas Open title on Saturday, defeating the first time pairing of Treat Huey (PHI) and Jerzy Janowicz (POL) 6-3, 3-6, 10-6 in 69 minutes in yet another thriller under the lights at the Indian Wells Tennis Garden.

 

Competing in the desert for the 15th time, the 34-year old twins, needed a super tiebreak to close out the match as Huey and Janowicz proved to be formidable opponents. Each team was only broken one time but in the end, the cohesiveness, experience and advanced skill level of the journeymen Americans proved to be the deciding factor.

 

After celebrating their 86th title together with a trademark chest bump, the brothers embraced.  Despite all of their success over the years, it was clear to see how much this championship meant to them.

 

The Bryans, who previously lost the 2003 and 2006 finals, praised Huey and Janowicz, who were playing in their first tournament together as a team,   ”We’ve played 3,000 tournaments,” Bob Bryan joked, “and we barely clipped you guys.”

 

With this latest win, the brothers secured their 22nd Masters Series 1000s and have increased their championship match winning percentage to 66% (86 of 130 finals).

How sweet it is.

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Doubles Delight in the Desert – Part 2

Bryan Brothers

By Jennifer Knapp

(March 13, 2013) INDIAN WELLS, California – After such an exciting day of doubles on Saturday I continued my quest to make it to as many ATP doubles matches at this year’s BNP Paribas Open as possible and thankfully, both Monday and schedule made it much easier to achieve my objective as I took in another  exciting matches.

 

On Monday, the first match I watched was James Blake and Mardy Fish taking on Feliciano López and Milos Raonic.  The match, originally scheduled for the 2200 seat Court 7, was moved into the main stadium shortly after the news of Leonardo Mayer’s withdrawal due to back injury and Rafael Nadal’s walkover victory. Needless to say, fans numbered 2201 and above were as the stadium was easily three-quarters full with a lively and primarily pro-USA crowd.   While Blake and Fish were equally as strong and in sync as they had been in their previous match, López and Raonic were not. It was López’s serve that was broken in each set but Raonic’s unforced errors contributed to each of the breaks.  Blake and Fish gave the crowd what they wanted as they advanced to the next round 6-3, 6-2 when López defaulted on match point.

 

A few hours later is was time for the next match on my agenda – number one seeds Bob and Mike Bryan versus friends and Davis Cup teammates, John Isner and Sam Querrey.  There was very little chance that this wouldn’t be a very exciting match and needless to say, there was an empty seat in the house, in fact, the lines outside the stands were the longest I’ve seen so far this week.   Interesting statistic about the Bryan’s Brothers and their record in the desert:  despite all of their success in other tournaments, including slams and the Olympics, they have never won the BNP Paribas Doubles’ title, making the finals only twice in the past 10 years (2003 & 2006).  Isner and Querrey made the final last year, losing to Marc López & Rafael Nadal.   The entire match was filled with amazing shot making and entertaining interaction amongst the players.  Isner & Querrey were formidable opponents but the experience and skill level of the Bryan’s proved to provide the upper hand when it mattered as they won the match 6-3, 6-3.  Always the showmen, the Bryan’s thank everyone in the stands for their unwavering support and proceeded to hit a few cans worth of tennis balls into the eagerly awaiting fans. Think I saw a few wristbands and towels being tossed out as well.

 

Less than 10 minutes after the Bryan’s left the court, the announcer was back on the microphone introducing the next competitors – the British team of Andy and Jamie Murray versus the Philippines’ Treat Huey and Poland’s Jerzy Janowicz, the latter two both making their debut in Indian Wells.  The Murray brothers, fresh of their first round victory over fifth seeds Robert Lindstedt and Nenad Zimonjic were looking to extend their streak but it wasn’t meant to be. The combination of Janowicz’s serves and Huey’s agility and ability to chase just about any shot down were a little too much for the Brits despite some absolutely fabulous shots. Huey and Janowicz with the win. 6-3, 7-5.

 

With that third and final doubles match, my Monday was done!

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Notes and Quotes from Down Under – Day 3

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(January 16, 2013) A look at some the questions and answers from day three of the 2013 Australian Open tennis tournament in Melbourne.

Maria Sharapova

Q.  You obviously have a pretty big candy business now, but you’re also making a lot of bagels.

MARIA SHARAPOVA:  I didn’t offer candy today (laughter).  Trying to make a good question?

I was just really trying to be focused.  You know, I didn’t know too much about my opponent; just knew she was a few inches shorter than I was.

But it’s always tough, especially when you’re up a set and a couple of breaks to keep that momentum.  You know, I really forced myself to concentrate and just get the job done today.

Q.  Have you enjoyed your first 48 hours on Twitter?

MARIA SHARAPOVA:  I’m a rookie.  There are a lot of things I’m still learning about.  I’m just starting to follow things and people.  Now I’m learning how to, is it hashtag things, right?  That was a new one for me.

But it’s interesting.  I mean, I won’t be doing it like every single minute.  I won’t be telling people what I’m eating.  I think that’s very non‑interesting.

But when I do have things to say, I’m sure I will.  Last night I was watching this match I really wanted to say something about the commentating going on, but I really bit my tongue on that one.

I was like, Isn’t that what Twitter is for, to open up?  Itself like, No, no.

Q.  Andy Roddick has been doing that.  He’s been criticizing commentating since he retired also on Twitter.

MARIA SHARAPOVA:  Well, it’s not like he didn’t when he was playing, so…

Q.  Does it surprise you that you can just say hello on social media and get 200,000 followers just like that (snapping fingers)?

MARIA SHARAPOVA:  It does.  It’s very flattering.  But it just shows you the power of social media, how everyone is just online these days with devices.

I mean, sometimes you see me and I have my notebook here and my phone here.  It’s like I’m looking back and forth.  Sometimes my mom speaks to me and she says, I think I need to send you a text message to get your attention.  It’s pretty crazy.

But it shows you how powerful these things are.  I’m happy that I’m able to share some things with my fans that maybe they don’t get to see or hear me say.  Just a fun way to communicate with them.

Q.  We can see Venus on this TV screen here.  She has a bright‑colored dress on.  Tricky to make comments.  She wore the same dress in her last match.  Any comment on her fashion statement?

MARIA SHARAPOVA:  I haven’t seen the dress.  Maybe I’ll see it in the next round and can comment.

Q.  Are you happy with these two bagel matches?  This happened 28 years ago.  Are you happy with it?

MARIA SHARAPOVA:  It’s not really the statistic I want to be known for.  I want to be known for winning Grand Slam titles, not that I won two matches 6‑0, 6‑0.

You know, I’m just happy that I won the match and I get to go through and I’m in the next round.

Q.  Date was talking about relating to the other generation.  Clearly she is a lot older than you, but do you find yourself feeling like an older player, and can you relate to the 18‑year‑olds?

MARIA SHARAPOVA:  Maybe not as old as that, but I feel like I’m somewhere in the middle definitely.  I feel like I’ve seen an older generation when I was quite young and just getting on the tour be at the peak of their career and competing really well and learning so much from that.

Now I find myself in a moment where you see so many, you know, youngsters ‑ not young, but 17, 18, 19, 20 years old ‑ that are doing really well.  And I guess that is the newer generation.

Sometimes you think it’s quite crazy because it seems like last minute you were there, you were one of them.

 

 

 Venus Williams

Q.  Do you feel more embraced by the public and fans than at any time in your career?

VENUS WILLIAMS:  I don’t know.  Maybe.  Perhaps.  I don’t know.  I think people have always been pretty nice to me.  I try to be nice to people, yeah.

 

Q.  Have you gotten any compliments on your dress?

VENUS WILLIAMS:  Yeah, I get a lot of compliments on my dress.

 

Q.  What do people say?

VENUS WILLIAMS:  They love the color.  I love your dress.  It’s a nice style.  Women’s players, men’s players, people working around.  That’s been very satisfying because I work hard on the designs.  I’ll spend all day and all night on the designs.  I eat hot fries usually during the design sessions.

Then the one time that I didn’t, I couldn’t think of anything, so I ordered some hot fries.  I got there the next day, and, bam, I had the best ideas.

But since that time I’ve really had to discontinue that.  I can’t eat the hot fries.  I credit all these designs to hot fries.

 

Q.  Are they like spicy French fries?

VENUS WILLIAMS:  Oh, they are so spicy, and I just keep eating ‘em and it hurts.  I just pop ‘em away.

It’s still vegan because it’s somewhat a potato.  It’s just very processed, extremely processed.  Probably poisonous (laughter).

Yeah, I don’t know why.  It’s just always been part of the design.  When I design, I eat hot fries

 

Madison Keys

Q.  So both your parents are lawyers, right?

MADISON KEYS:  Yes.

Q.  Both still working?

MADISON KEYS:  Both are still working, yes.

Q.  How did you get from lawyers’ kid, especially two working lawyers, to become a tennis player at this level?

MADISON KEYS:  Complete luck.  No one in my family plays tennis.  I just came upon it one day.  Just thought, Hey, I’ll try it.  You know, it’s worked out pretty well.

Q.  So you got addicted pretty quickly?

MADISON KEYS:  For sure.  Right away.

Q.  First time?

MADISON KEYS:  First time, fell in love.

Q.  Went home and said, I got to play tennis every day; get me lessons?

MADISON KEYS:  Every single day.  My parents fed me balls.  Eventually it turned into having a coach, and then it went to being at an academy.

Q.  Your parents don’t play?

MADISON KEYS:  Neither one can play tennis.

Q.  What initially attracted you when you saw tennis for the first time?

MADISON KEYS:  The outfits (smiling).

Really wanted a tennis dress.  My parents told me that if I played, they would buy me one.  I was like, Hey, I’ll try it.

Q.  Who were your tennis idols growing up?  Who did you like to watch?

MADISON KEYS:  Really, really liked watching Kim Clijsters.  I thought she was very passionate, and I thought her movement was incredible.

Q.  How old were you when you started, picked up the racquet for the first time?

MADISON KEYS:  I was four.

 

Jerzy Janowicz

Q.  What exactly frustrated you out there on court?

JERZY JANOWICZ:  Mostly only first set because the umpires, they’re making so many mistakes.  One of the most important mistake was set point in this tiebreak, 9‑8.  Was shanked forehand from Devvarman.  The ball was really slow.  It was clean out.  I was already happy.  I was already shouting, C’mon.  But the referees didn’t say anything.

This was the moment when I went nuts.  Otherwise the rest of the match I was pretty calm.

Q.  Do you have any regrets about the things you did on the court in terms of when you went nuts?

JERZY JANOWICZ:  Well, sometimes happens like this.  You can’t control your emotions all the time.  This was really big point for me.  We played this set for more than 1 hour, 10 minutes, so this was really important point for me.

Actually, I went nuts.  I calmed down little bit later on.  Sometimes I have problem to control my emotions, but I’m trying to work on this.

Q.  What exactly did you do to calm yourself down and come back to win that match?

JERZY JANOWICZ:  I don’t really know.  I was all the time trying to be focused.  I was all the time telling myself to fight for every single ball.  And somehow I just relaxed.  I have no explanation why.

Q.  Have you gone as nuts as that in a match before?

JERZY JANOWICZ:  Yeah (smiling).

Q.  Have you hit the umpire’s chair before?

JERZY JANOWICZ:  Maybe (smiling).

Q.  Do you expect to get in trouble for that?

JERZY JANOWICZ:  No, no.  I got warning only because I was shouting.  I didn’t say anything bad.  I was only shouting, so this was the problem.  Because umpire told me I got a warning because I was shouting.  They play some matches around us, so this was the problem.

I didn’t say anything bad, so I hope I not have to pay.

Q.  What about at the end?  You were very animated.  Somebody gave you flowers.  Has that ever happened before?

JERZY JANOWICZ:  Yes, some girls, they gave me flowers.  This was first time.  Never, never happen to me before.

Q.  You haven’t played this tournament before.  Was it a question of not having the financial resources to get to Australia in the past?

JERZY JANOWICZ:  Yeah.  Actually I played 2010 quallies, qualifications.  So, I mean, last year I couldn’t come here because of money.  Now I think I have little bit better situation because I have already a sponsor.

So is much, much easier for me mentally to play this Australian Open because I didn’t have to worry about money anymore.

Q.  Where were you this time last year?

JERZY JANOWICZ:  I played futures, 10,000, in England.

Q.  Quite a big change from last year to this.

JERZY JANOWICZ:  Small one (smiling).

Q.  You said it was a money thing.  How much money did you make the previous year, or not make?

JERZY JANOWICZ:  How much money I make?

Q.  In 2011.

JERZY JANOWICZ:  I think you can check this.  During 2011, yeah?  I don’t know.  You have to check this on ATP page.

Q.  But not enough that you could afford to come here.

JERZY JANOWICZ:  No, of course not.  At that time I was ranked 220, so there’s not really ranking to make some money.  And in Poland we don’t have too many opportunities to get money from sponsors.

I was struggling a little bit, so that’s why I didn’t play last year.

Q.  All of a sudden you are making money and have sponsors.  Has this changed you, your life?

JERZY JANOWICZ:  This changed my life, but this not change me.  I’m all the time same crazy person, and I hope is going to be all the time the same.

But, I mean, yeah, in life you change a lot.  Now I don’t have to worry about my trips.  I can buy easily business class for me for that kind of trip like to Australia.  Now I don’t have to worry about money for my coach.

So it’s much easier for me to play tennis now.

Q.  Did you enjoy playing out there on court today?  What was your experience with the Australian crowd?

JERZY JANOWICZ:  I would say Polish crowd mostly (smiling).

Yeah, it was really nice atmosphere today.  Polish people, they were helping me all the time.  Even when I was losing 2‑Love, they didn’t stop.  They were all the time cheering for me.

So it’s always helpful, and it’s nice to play like this.

Q.  Did you surprise yourself?  Given what happened at the end of the first set and then you lost the second quite easily, it looked like you were gone.

JERZY JANOWICZ:  No, I’m really strange person, and anyway always I’m fighting till the end.  Even when I’m going nuts sometimes, I’m always trying to win no matter what.

If I surprise myself?  Yeah, maybe, because it never happen to me before.  I was never losing two sets to love, so this is some kind of surprise for me.

Q.  Since Bercy, have you felt sometimes the media attention was too much around you?

JERZY JANOWICZ:  Yeah, especially in Poland.  First week after Bercy, I was going from TV show to some other TV show.  I didn’t have really free time for myself.

So this week was really not easy for me.  But, you know, you have to cooperate sometimes with media, yeah.  But always if there’s something too much, it’s not nice.

I was able to handle this.

Q.  What is the strangest thing you read about yourself since Bercy?

JERZY JANOWICZ:  Honestly saying I’m not reading any articles about myself.  I cannot answer for this question.

 

 Sam Stosur

Q.  Do you think you choked?

SAMANTHA STOSUR:  I don’t know.  Whatever word you want to put on it.  At 5‑2 up in the third, double break probably is a bit of a choke, yeah.

Q.  What was going through your mind at 5‑2 in the third and your opponent getting those games back?

SAMANTHA STOSUR:  I mean, at 5‑2 I felt great obviously.  I’d broken again to get a double break.  Then went out to serve the game like I had been the last 10 service games, or whatever it was.  There was no kind of negative feeling, because I started playing really quite well.

Then, yeah, got a little bit tight.  You miss a return here, a shot there, then you do the right thing, and then you don’t do it.  It was, yeah, it was too in and out for those points in time.  You make a few more errors and you’re back even.

Q.  When you say crazy things come into your head, what do you think?  Like, It’s not happening again?

SAMANTHA STOSUR:  Not necessarily it’s happening again.  You don’t want it to go any further.  It’s 5‑2.  You don’t want it to go any further than 5‑3.  We’ve all seen it happen before to many players.  You know what it feels like.  You’re desperately trying not to make it happen.

It’s probably, yeah, part of not really doing what you should be doing to obviously get to that point.

 

 Ryan Harrison

Q.  Do you think it takes some draws that give you more of a head start into the tournament?  You hit a bunch of walls early here.

RYAN HARRISON:  I’m not concerned about the draws at all.  It doesn’t matter to me the draws or things that you can’t control.  Like I said before, my goal is to win these tournaments one day.

I’m not concerned about losing second, third, or fourth round.  I want to get to the point where I’m good enough to win these tournaments eventually.

And playing these guys and having the opportunity to play everybody ‑‑ I’ve played on every stadium except for Ashe at this point, which is pretty exciting for me to know that moving forward in my career that I’m not going to have anything that I haven’t seen before.

 

Q.  Has it been strange to have no Roddick around here?

RYAN HARRISON:  I mean, not really.  I talk to him pretty much every day since I’ve been here.  He’s been actively talking to me and helping me.

Any time I ask him how he’s doing, he’s always doing great.  He doesn’t seem like he’s depressed, to say the least.  He’s loving life.

It’s certainly strange that he’s not the top dog right now.  But as he would tell you guys, he’s still ranked ahead of me, so…

 

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