2014/10/25

Patrick Rafter Tops John McEnroe in Philadelphia to Earn PowerShares Series Title

By Amy Fetherolf‏

(November 2, 2012) PHILADELPHIA – Tennis stars took over Philadelphia’s Wells Fargo Center on Friday night in a PowerShares Series event featuring John McEnroe, Jim Courier, Patrick Rafter, and Michael Chang. Rafter picked up the title in his first PowerShares Series appearance since 2009, defeating McEnroe, 8-4 in the final.

 

The four participating players combined for 14 Grand Slam titles during their illustrious ATP careers, and they showcased some of their old magic in a fan-friendly exhibition format.

 

To start the event, Courier took on McEnroe. The 53-year-old McEnroe, 11 years senior to his opponent, nevertheless displayed the finesse that earned him seven Grand Slam singles titles.

 

Down an early break in the set, and as shouts of encouragement, “Hey, Johnny!” and “Johnny Mac!” rang through the court, McEnroe clubbed a forehand down-the-line to break back, raising his arms in victory.

 

The crowd reveled in McEnroe’s occasional temperamental outbursts. He slapped at the net with his racquet after pushing a passing shot long, and chucked the racquet onto the tennis court so hard that it bounced off the rubbery playing surface.

 

Courier hit his trademark compact forehands with aplomb, but McEnroe outfoxed him with cleverly placed drop shots and deep returns that earned him the necessary break of serve. McEnroe took the one-set match 6-4.

 

Next, Rafter took on Chang for a chance to take on McEnroe in the final. Rafter’s serve-and-volley style against Chang’s defensive prowess made for an intriguing match-up on paper. But Rafter hardly looked like he’d missed a day on the ATP Tour. He breezed through the match, 6-2, hitting incredible volleys in the process.

 

In the final, it was mostly one-way traffic for Rafter. He and McEnroe, two of the sport’s greatest volleyers, battled each other for the edge up at the net. Rafter showed off his effortless backhand overhead volley, a shot that delighted the crowd.

Broken once, Rafter was able to break McEnroe’s iconic lefty serve three times to win the match.

 

“I’ve haven’t played too many competitive matches in awhile, but I moved really well, I’ve been doing a lot of fitness work back home, so I guess it all paid off,” Rafter said after the final. “You want to come out here and still play well. I’m still at an age where I feel like I can hit the ball okay, so I want to enjoy it while I can.”

 

“John puts me under a lot of pressure on my serve, and I felt it all the time. I always find him very difficult to play against. He’s unreal, he’s amazing.”

Amy Fetherolf‏ is the founder of the tennis news site Drop Shot Dispatch and a co-founder of the new tennis site The Changeover.  Follow her on twitter at  @AmyFetherolf.

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“On The Call” with John and Patrick McEnroe

Patrick McEnroe

On Friday ESPN’s John and Patrick McEnroe discussed the US Open on a media conference call which begins Monday, August 27, with extensive coverage on ESPN2 and ESPN3.

 

Q.  Doing a story on your brother, Mark.  For both of you what does he bring to his job at the academy?  And what part do you expect him to play in the debate about the future of American tennis and where the next great tennis start is going to come from?

PATRICK McENROE:  Well, he can get in line to get into the debate.  I mean, we are all enjoying that.  Mark has been the big man until the middle for many years and I’m happy he’s in the game.  I’m very happy that John got himself into the game.  John put his money where his mouth is by doing his own thing and his own academy and that’s awesome for tennis and New York in general.

 

For Mark, he’s a pretty darned good tennis player, so the fact that he’s working alongside John is great for him and great for the family.  And I know John feels pretty good having him alongside, and I know I feel pretty good when I take my little daughter up there for lessons and he takes care of it, so it’s all good.

 

JOHN McENROE:  At my club over in Randall’s Island; it’s nice to have someone you trust who also loves the sport.  As Patrick pointed out, being the middle brother, he can bridge the gap of Patrick and I on any issues that I think in the long run is going to help all of us.  I’m looking forward to hopefully the situation where all of us work together, not just the two of us.

Q.  Given his background, Wall Street lawyer and working in hedge funds and stuff like that ‑‑

PATRICK McENROE:  I’m not going to hold that against him.

Q.  Do you think that helps in bringing in a different perspective a little bit?

JOHN McENROE:  Well, I think that strictly from the managerial standpoint, he’s a smart guy and being a lawyer, he can help me with things that other, quote, unquote, tennis guys wouldn’t be able to.  As far as whether or not it helps in the sort of world of tennis, I honestly can’t say that you can make a determination that because he was around Wall Street or involved with hedge funds that that necessarily makes him better equipped to deal with the politics that goes along with tennis or the sport itself.  I mean, I think that’s a bit of a stretch.

Q.  I wanted to ask you for your thoughts on the men’s field, in particular, of the top three seeds, who do you see as the favorite, and who among them do you think has more at stake or maybe just a word about what each respectively kind of has at stake in the last slam of the year.

JOHN McENROE:  Yeah, I was just going to say that to me, the three of them ‑‑ I almost think that you can make an argument for all three.  I think it’s very close.  They are sort of all ‑‑ it would be hard to pick one of them right now, because you can make an argument for any one of them.  I can say that as far as what’s at stake, I think Murray has got the most at stake, because, yes, he’s won this Olympic thing, but I think it’s pretty universally understood that it’s not quite ‑‑ while it’s become more important obviously in the fact that it was at Wimbledon was helpful, it’s not thought of I think in the same way as the slams.

 

So I don’t think the burr is off him but I’m hoping that it can break the ice so to speak and he can win some slams.  I think he has the most to loss and the most to gain at this point.  Before the Olympics, it was between the three guys, you know, obviously Rafa is not here; who would win and then become No. 1.

 

But now the way it pans out, it’s conceivable that Murray could make an argument were he to win this, and then have a strong season, and, say, win the Masters, there’s a possibility that you could say he’s the best player in the world this year.  To me that’s an unbelievable upside.  In some ways Roger has accomplished ‑‑ I thought he would win another major and be back at No. 1.  He’s proved a lot of people wrong there.

 

Djokovic obviously has this year, greatest year in 40 years, and he’s not been really at the same level.  Yet, he’s still for a guy who has really had not as good a year as he had last year, is still in the mix; if he were to win this, he could be No. 1 again and will be No. 1.  So that’s quite a nice thing for him, as well.

 

PATRICK McENROE:  I think that obviously this year, in particular, I think it’s pretty cool that he’s got No. 1 really up for grabs in The Open at the first time in a while. As to John’s point, career‑wise, Murray has the most at stake because he just has not won one.  But for a different year, they have all got a lot at stake because you can easily make the case that if any one of the three wins it, they will and should be No. 1 for the year.  Obviously there’s still tennis to be played post the Open, but certainly either Roger or Djokovic win this, they are No. 1 this year because they have won two Majors.

 

I think Roger is probably a slight favorite, just because I think that having won Wimbledon again and gotten back to No. 1, I feel like watching him in Cincinnati, which I know is slightly different than a US Open, that he’s sort of playing with no pressure at all.  He’s sort of playing with house money, because he has not won one for so long, and to keep ‑‑ for him, he kind of got the monkey off his back and then he had not won for three years.

 

So I think when he plays with that sort of freedom and abandon, he’s very, very dangerous.  You know, he’s obviously the most talented player that I’ve ever seen, so I think when he can play with that kind of freedom, it makes him that much tougher to beat.

 

Now, that being said, I think the conditions here with the tournament being back‑loaded for the last couple of days, I think that makes it a little bit trickier for him with potentially to potentially beat Murray and then Novak back‑to‑back on hard courts with a lot of heat or maybe wind or rain delays, things like that.  So I think that’s sort of the X‑factor for Federer.  But from a pure tennis standpoint of what I’ve seen the last three months, I would call him the favorite.

Q.  It seems like this year, Federer, there’s just been a little bit of a flip flop.  Djokovic was obviously so dominant last year and Federer, we were talking about, will he ever win another one; and now it seems like he’s No. 1 again.  Do you think that’s more that Federer is playing better or Djokovic is not playing as well?  And the second question I wanted to ask is about Serena, and obviously once again, as we always say, when she feels like it and when she plays well, there’s nobody that can beat her and all this.  What do you think of this Kerber, this German woman who has been playing well; do you think that she’s someone we should be watching or do you think Serena is just going to kind of roll over everybody again?

JOHN McENROE:  I’ll go first.  Federer is playing better, I believe, and Djokovic has dropped off a little bit.  And I think Federer prefers a Djokovic match up to Nadal, and it’s the opposite, interestingly enough, with Djokovic.  He seems to prefer to play Nadal right now than Roger.  Some of it was timing, and obviously there’s always a little bit of luck that goes into it, such as the roof closing when they played at Wimbledon, things of that nature.

 

But the match‑up seems to suit Roger, and he seems to be more comfortable in that situation.  And it was hard to keep up, for anyone to keep up that level, because Djokovic had pushed all year towards becoming the first guy since Laver to hold all four slams at the same time.  When he lost that final where he almost had a chance to get back in and win, I think there was a letdown.

 

So, yeah, I think there’s been a shift, but Djokovic, as Patrick rightly pointed out, would still be No. 1 if he wins this.  I think he’s really sort of had some time to sort of get over the frustration, not a lot of time obviously, because the Olympics definitely complicates things.  But he had a couple tough losses there and lost to Roger at Wimbledon.  He sucked it up and played a couple of the hard courts and he’s got a week here.  I think he’s definitely feeling like he should win this thing.

 

As far as Kerber, I’ve watched Kerber play for the last couple years and she’s someone to me who is an extremely smart tennis player.  She knows the game and she knows how to sort of ‑‑ she’s like sort of a natural tennis thinker.

 

However; if, Serena, to me, is mentally and physically ready to play and into it, I don’t think there’s a player alive that can beat her right now.  Now, of course she’s only won one slam in the last few years, so it’s not as if she’s been ‑‑ I think there’s been seven straight different women winning slams, I believe, or something close to that.  And Kerber is someone who is one of those that if she catches you on an off‑day can beat anyone, but I don’t see her with the type of firepower needed to go all the way.

 

PATRICK McENROE:  I think Serena is obviously the favorite, but I think there’s more that can go wrong in the US Open for her than certainly at Wimbledon.  And what I mean by that is she’s ‑‑ it’s interesting reading her article in the New York Times magazine that she’s got a little something in her head about things going wrong at the US Open, whether it’s the grunting or the line call or the point penalty, etc.

 

So that’s not a good thing for her.  And I think probably more importantly even than that, even though she said she loves hard court and it’s her favorite surface, I think her weakness, obviously there are not many, but when she gets inconsistent can show up a little bit more on a hard court than playing on a grass court where her serve is that much more magnified.  Wind can also hurt her a little bit.

As John said she’s the best out there but seven straight matches ‑‑ even the first week of Wimbledon, you know, she very nearly lost a couple of times.  So if that kind of thing happens again at the US Open, she can be in trouble.  But Kerber is certainly someone that I think can be around in the second week, but I’m amazed at her negative attitude out there that she gets so negative, and yet she’s still able to compete.  I think if she could somehow get a little more positive, that might help her once she gets to the quarters and semis.  And obviously there’s some other young players.

Q.  A lot of people are talking about the change Andy Murray is going through under the guidance of Ivan Lendl.  So my question is about coaching.  What do you need for a player to find the right coach?  Is it a connection that can change a player’s mentality, and can a coach have that much impact?

JOHN McENROE:  Yeah, that’s a great question.  I’m not sure there is an answer, and it obviously depends on an individual and the timing of it.  I mean, Murray has been through a number of coaches, and a number of world‑class coaches.   So this could have ‑‑ it seems to have come at a time, a pretty critical point in his career, where perhaps Ivan had the credibility of someone who had been in a similar situation as Andy, having not won his first four Grand Slams, losing in the finals, and then being one of the great players of all time, Ivan Lendl.

 

So sometimes a player needs to sort of have someone who has been there, done that.  And other times, you could look at other players in the Top‑10, where they have had the same coaches since they were teenagers or even before, and they feel a comfort level.  So it’s wildly unpredictable; when Paul Annacone first started working with Roger, most people assumed he would try to get Roger become more aggressive, particularly against Nadal, maybe come in and take an earlier volley more.

 

Very, very subtle changes; it took years ‑‑ to me, it seems like the reason why Roger won Wimbledon this year was in the finals against Murray, it was one of the greatest volleying performances I’ve ever seen him have, considering he had not been volleying that well beforehand.  So would you say that’s an influence of Paul Annacone finally, or not; it’s hard to say, is the bottom line.

 

But certainly there’s been occasions where a coach can have a fairly significant impact.  There’s other times where you’ve seen some of the other players play without coaches.  Tsonga is without a coach and he’s playing the best tennis of his career.  Federer played for the better part of a few years winning Grand Slams without a coach.  So this is something that is hard to say exactly, but certainly, there’s a handful of people out there that have made a difference with some of the top players.

PATRICK McENROE:  Oh, there’s no doubt it (a new coach) can (help).  I only heard the second half of John’s answer, and I certainly agree a hundred percent with what he said.  Absolutely there’s cases where a coach can give you a burst of energy.  Sometimes you just need to hear a different voice.  Obviously players that are in the top ‑‑ winning tennis matches their entire life.  So they are used to that.  They are used to winning.  But sometimes they just need a different push.

 

In the case of someone like a Murray, he’s someone that brought a little something to the table.  Lendl has experience.  Really, as John said, it depends on the individual and it depends on the relationship between the coach and the player.  I mean, you spend so much time with that person that it’s not necessarily always about X’s and O’s.  It’s about the relationship and the trust that you have and where you are at this stage of your career that you’re willing to say, okay, I’m going to listen to somebody like that.

Q.  Wondering about Andy Murray, do you see anyone early in his run in the draw who could cause a problem?  I know he’s kind of got that out of his system and is going deep in most Majors recently.  Are there any dangers for him early in the draw that you see, any other big guns, any dangerous for them early in the draw?

JOHN McENROE:  Well, I don’t have the draw in front of me but I believe he’s slated to play Raonic in the 16s.  So that would be an example of someone that potentially, I think, could be a problem for any top player.  Just like a guy like John Isner could be if he’s on his game.  These guys that have huge firepower and get you out of your comfort zone.  So that’s the type of a person on a hot day or an off‑day where he’s serving big could provide problems for him or any player.  I look at a player like that and I think to myself, that could be a future top‑five player.          Patrick, do you know who his quarter is?

 

PATRICK McENROE:  I don’t have that in front of me either.

JOHN McENROE:  I believe it’s Tsonga, if I’m not mistaken.  Those are obviously matches in his record, I’m pretty sure it’s Tsonga, and I believe if that is the case, that that would be someone who he has a good record against.  Yeah, of course, he’s the type of player that could obviously beat anyone on a given day, but I think he’s only one in six events against Andy.

 

But more than who he’s playing, it’s actually how ‑‑ I don’t know if there’s anything to what’s happened since the Olympics.  I mean, there’s obviously a big letdown coming straight from there and having to go play.  He was supposed to play Raonic and he pulled out with the knee.  I saw the first match he played in Cincy and I thought he looked good.  He looked like he was moving well and then he lost the next round.  That surprised me.

 

Having said that, he’s much tougher to beat in a longer match, if he’s healthy.  So I still would suspect that if he’s playing as well as ‑‑ because the way he played at the Olympics, I don’t see him not making a serious run and not winning the whole thing.

 

PATRICK McENROE:  I agree, I think he’s probably the most vulnerable of the top three, but that’s not saying a lot because the other guys are pretty much not vulnerable at all, Djokovic and Federer.  Murray still does have those matches where his energy is sort of low and he can be very defensive.  I don’t think he has them as often as he did.  Certainly Lendl has helped him a lot there.  I think he’s a little more vulnerable to a solid guy who is ranked between 15 and 30 upsetting him than Federer and Djokovic are.

Q.  How important is the Olympic title compared to Grand Slam title?  And how are Nadal’s injury problems?

JOHN McENROE:  Those are both good questions.  With Nadal, we are all worried, and we are all hopeful he will make the type of comeback that he made when he injured his knee like three years ago.  When you are talking about one of the greatest to ever play the game, you don’t want to see him have to go out with physical problems before he wants to.  So that goes without saying that everyone is concerned, including myself, that we want to see him back in the mix as soon as possible, because he’s huge for our sport.  And the first part of the question was, what was it again?  I’m sorry.

 

Q.  How important is the Olympic title compared to a Grand Slam title?

JOHN McENROE:  The Olympics started to get some recognition, this is just my opinion, when Agassi won in ’96, he had not really done a whole lot that year for his standards.  He showed that it meant a lot to him, and I think that raised some eyebrows with players that up to that time, and following it even, a lot of the top players, maybe half the top players, if not more, didn’t play.

 

So each Olympics that’s gone by, I think you’ve seen more top players play, perhaps at the expense of Davis Cup, for example.  They picked and choose, and realize it’s only one week or ten days and now it’s one week and they have cut it to two‑out‑of‑three, and there’s something beautiful about the Olympics.

 

I think in the future, there to be a decision made, in my opinion, they should elevate it; if we are going to play it, we should elevate it to something that’s as big as the Grand Slams, which I don’t think it is.   I mean, I know points‑wise, it’s considered to be behind 14 other tournaments, the four Majors and the ten Masters Series.  I find that ludicrous.  But I don’t think that at this point, even though it was nice for Murray and it was a boost at Wimbledon that it’s at the level of the four slams.

 

And it would have to be determined by the powers that be or the players, whether it’s 2016 or 2020, that this will count as a fifth Grand Slam, as an example.  So that in the history books, when you count how many Grand Slams people have won, it would include the Olympics.  Well, maybe you can’t do that.  But to me, that’s the only way it would truly be at the same level as the other slams.

Q.  John, are you looking forward to the exhibition game with Adam Sandler, and how much practice is involved with you and Adam with that?  Will you and Adam be practicing?

JOHN McENROE:  Hopefully.  He may need a little more practice than I do, I’m just guessing.  But yeah, I’m looking forward to it.  It’s going to be fun.  It’s Thursday night, Wednesday or Thursday, that’s right before men’s quarters and that’s a big time for our men as it winds down to the top couple players.

 

PATRICK McENROE:  Let me just say, John, since he won’t be able to be in the broadcast booth for that match, I’m hoping Will Ferrell will come up and join me.

 

JOHN McENROE:  Well, you know, you may know this, Pat, Will was originally involved but I guess he decided he would rather broadcast a match with you.  They have got Kevin James, who obviously he’s got a sense of humor, too, and Adam.  So I think it’s going to be a lot of fun.  If I don’t break too much of a sweat, I’ll try to get up there for that match with you.

Q.  Have you ever played with him before?  Are you friends?

JOHN McENROE:  I would like to consider myself a friend.  He’s been nice enough to put me in for his movies, not regularly by any means.  I would like to consider myself as a friend to some degree.  Think he’s a great guy.  But I have not been on a tennis court with him, never.

Q.  That is exciting and we are looking forward to that.

JOHN McENROE:  I’ll be nervous but I’ll be less nervous than him in this case, because there will probably be 10,000 or 15,000, and I’m a little more used to it on a tennis court than he is.  Hopefully I won’t be the one to lay an egg but I’m confident that we’re going to get it done.

 

THE MODERATOR:  For folks who are not familiar with what they are talking about, the second Thursday of the tournament, 7:00 on ESPN2, Adam Sandler and John will team against Kevin James and Jim Courier in an exhibition doubles match for charity, and comedian Colin Quinn will be the chair umpire and will no doubt have his hands full.

Q.  A lot of players are doing better these days it seems, after the age of 30.  How does a pro train, eat and compete differently when you get to that point of your career and draw back on your own histories, if you could.

JOHN McENROE:  Well, I’ll start.  I wasn’t one of those guys that got better with age, so I do sort of look at what’s happening today and sort of feel like, wow, it would be good to be sort of around a time where you have more knowledge about the training, the best training to do on and off the court, what to eat, how to recover, etc.

 

And so you see basically players with teams around him now.  And so that every little detail is executed to the highest possible degree; and it sort of would be nice to feel like at a later age ‑‑ I think that in a nutshell, is because of the knowledge and the ability to sort of make decisions pretty quickly that will help the player, a, improve, or b, recover, is why you saw more 30‑year‑olds and older than ever playing at Wimbledon this year.

I think that’s good because you are able to appreciate even more what you’ve accomplished and better able to handle what goes along with it.  So I’m actually happy to see that this is becoming more of a trend than ever.

 

PATRICK McENROE:  I would just add to that that I think it’s not only the top, top players; that obviously can afford to have a coach and trainer and hitting partner, but it’s players that are not even necessarily at the top, top of the game.  Tommy Haas obviously was a Top‑5 player, but even guys below him, you know, are still playing into their early 30s that don’t have a full‑time.

 

I think that’s just realizing the off‑court training is more important as you get older, taking care of your body, doing the off‑court fitness, stretching.  So get to the point where the tennis side of it isn’t as important as the hours that you spend on the court.  But I think a lot of these players spend as much time, if not more, sort of preparing to play, preparing to practice, and doing off‑court work to keep their bodies as fit as possible.  I think it’s great for tennis but it’s not great for the young guys trying to break in.  It used to be that 17, 18, 19 years old, you were breaking through and winning Majors.  Now, you can barely get a teenager in the top hundred in the men’s game.

Q.  Specifically to Roger, what has he done both on the court and from what you may know off the court, his training, to maintain this level?

JOHN McENROE:  I don’t know the specifics of that, but I do know that Roger was someone who trained a lot harder than people realise.  He had a place in the Far East, the Middle East, excuse me, in Dubai, and trained in extreme conditions, hot conditions.  And I’m going under the assumption to some degree, but I don’t know this for sure, exactly what Patrick said is what he’s doing.  He’s maximizing sort of his off‑court training to subsidize what he does on the court, because his body ‑‑ he would be a perfect example to test out, because he’s 31 and he’s now participating, I believe, in his 52nd consecutive major.  So if there’s ever a guy to look at and see what he’s doing, that should be studied for sure.

 

PATRICK McENROE:  Obviously what makes Federer so great, obviously his ability, his talent, but his work ethic and his ability to brush off both the wins and the losses.  That’s what’s been to me the most amazing thing that he’s had these sort of crushing losses in big matches, whether it was Djokovic last year in the Open where he could easily look back and say, man, a couple of swings here or there, and I would have 21 majors.

 

But he somehow managed to just let it happen, no big deal, I’m moving on, I’ll playing well; he never dwells on either the negative or the positive.  I think he certainly uses the positive when he gets on a roll and gets the confidence going.              That’s why I think coming into this year’s Open, he’s going to be very, very tough to beat, because I feel like he’s playing with more confidence than he’s had in a couple of years.  Obviously when he didn’t have the utmost of confidence, you could still play him as the No. 2 or No. 3 player in the world.

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Peter Fleming Named Associate Director of John McEnroe Tennis Academy

 

Together they formed one of the most prolific doubles teams in tennis history.  Now, longtime friends and tennis partners John McEnroe and Peter Fleming are again teaming up – this time in an effort to boost the sport they love, as Fleming was today named an Associate Academy Director at the John McEnroe Tennis Academy.

McEnroe and Fleming will officially kick off this re-constituting of their partnership with a kids clinic at the new Sportime Lake Isle in Eastchester, New York on Sunday August 26th at noon.  Lake Isle will be one of two new annexes for the JMTA, with the other being in Bethpage, New York.

Fleming, once the No. 1 doubles and No. 8 singles player in the world, will be based out of the JMTA’s flagship Randall’s Island and Lake Isle locations.  He will maintain a presence at both clubs from September through May.

“Peter and I have known each other since the early 1970s,” said McEnroe, “and probably no one on the planet knows better than Peter about my approach to the game – both on and off court – and how I would like to see the game played, kids train, and parents to act.  It’s a perfect fit.”

“I am very excited to be able to work formally again with John and the staff at JMTA,” Fleming said. “I have talked with John for years about his dream of exposing the game to a new generation  of kids and using a system he believes in to build a new group of dedicated players and lifelong fans of the game, and anything I can do to help him I will.”

Fleming paired with McEnroe to win 57 doubles titles, notably Wimbledon four times (1979, 1981, 1983, 1984) and the US Open three times (1979, 1981, 1983).  The duo also won seven straight Masters titles from 1978-84, never losing a match at Madison Square Garden in New York.  The pair also earned four ATP Doubles Team of the Year honors (1979, 1981, 1983, 1984).

The hard-hitting right hander was a perfect complement to McEnroe, as the pair reached 68 doubles finals and compiled a 351-42 record.  In Davis Cup play, they recorded a stellar 14-1 mark, winning three titles (1979, 1981, 1982).

In addition to his new duties at the JMTA, which will focus on working with top players privately and in group sessions, Fleming will continue as a standout commentator for Sky TV.

Peter joins a staff that now includes fellow Associate Academy Director and New Jersey native, Fritz Buehning, a former world top 20 player who made a run to the U.S. Open doubles final in 1981]only to run into Fleming/McEnroe at their peak. “With  Fritz and Peter on a staff led by Academy Director, Lawrence Kleger, and with Johnny Mac himself inspiring the troops, JMTA is becoming what we envisioned it would be – the best academy in the world,” comments Sportime Chief Executive Officer Claude Okin. “We are ready to train the next generation the great American players at JMTA.”

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Washington Kastles Continue Quest for Perfection; Extend Streak to 28

NEW YORK, NY – Hall of Fame football coach Vince Lombardi once said, “perfection is not attainable, but if we chase perfection we can catch excellence.” In World TeamTennis the Washington Kastles lead by coach Murphy Jensen have both attained perfection and caught excellence since late July of 2010. The 12-0 Kastles, 2011 World TeamTennis champions, who have already clinched a playoff spot, and have extended their winning streak to 28 victories in a row since July 22, 2010, with a 21-16 victory over the New York Sportimes (7-5) at Randall’s Island on Wednesday night.
The streak is now the second longest in team sports, behind the Los Angeles Lakers‘ 33 in a row during the 1971-72 NBA season.
Coach Jensen doesn’t seem to be consumed with the quest for another perfect season.
“Every day is another opportunity to make a masterpiece,” said Jensen. “We really live shot to shot, moment to moment, heartbeat to heartbeat. And we really don’t get too caught up in it actually.
“It’s really funny because I don’t think there is time in World TeamTennis because we are traveling so much. Just lugging bags around and getting to the next spot.”
Newcomers to the Kastles – Treat  Huey and Raquel Kops-Jones proved to be the most valuable players for the Kastles against the Sportimes with both winning their doubles sets, particularly closing out the match with a mixed doubles victory over  Hall of Famer John McEnroe and future Hall of Famer Martina Hingis 5-3.
Murphy pointed out the keys to success against for his mixed doubles team versus the veterans were Huey’s serves and Kops-Jones’s returns.
“It was fun,” Huey said, definitely, I grew up watching them play a ton. They’re really cool people. Some of the greatest players of all time. I’m thankful to have opportunity to play against them.”
“I played Hingis for maybe one game in World TeamTennis about three years ago,” Kops-Jones explained. ” Never played against McEnroe so that was something. You can see why sometimes there the legends that they are from the shots that they can make. Their hands are still pretty good…it never really leaves them.  It was fun.”
Both Huey and Kops-Jones are recent sunstitutes to the team due to some regular players competing in the Olympic Games in London.
“I’ve only been on the team since Sunday,” noted Huey.  But everyone on the team is so close that I’ve such a good time. They’ve welcomed me and everybody is so nice to me, we’re a real team. The atmosphere is unbelievable. I can’t think of a team that’s closer than this team, that’s why I think we’re doing real well.
“Everybody is accountable for each other and we come out and have some fun. Obviously we play a game and we play some tennis to entertain the fans. So it’s always good to get out here and have a little fun and obviously winning makes it a lot more fun and that’s always good.”
“There’s a bit of pressure since I just came in yesterday as a substitute,”  said Kops-Jones. “So we want to keep that streak going for the regular team. It’s a bit of pressure but the more we keep getting the “w’s” the better we feel.
“I tell the guys,” explained Murphy, “I really don’t care about the scoreboard. You do what you do as good as you can do it, as hard as you can do it – that’s success. And if you do that and the scoreboard isn’t in our favor, we are still successful.” Murphy may not be from the Lombardi mold as a coach, but for 28 straight matches, he’s pushed all the right buttons for the Kastles to achieve excellence.
The Kastles will try to extend their streak to 29-0 when they visit the Kansas City Explorers on Friday.
Karen Pestaina for Tennis Panorama
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Podcasts – John McEnroe and Andre Agassi Face-off in World TeamTennis

RANDALL’S ISLAND, NEW YORK CITY – (July 19, 2012) -  NY Sportimes John McEnroe lost to Andre Agassi representing the Boston Lobsters in the men’s singles in World TeamTennis on Thursday night.

Agassi edged McEnroe in a 5-4 tiebreak. In the mixed doubles, McEnroe and Hingis teamed to stop Agassi and Gullickson-Eagle 5-3.

The NY Sportimes defeated the Lobsters 22-18 World TeamTennis.

Proceeds from the match benefited the Johnny Mac Tennis Project, McEnroe’s not-for-profit foundation to provide scholarships, coaching, transportation and other financial assistance to qualified young tennis players in the greater New York area.

Listen to the post-match on-court interviews where both men talk about competing and other tennis topics:

John McEnroe of NYSportimes- Post-Match on-court interview 7192012 World Team Tennis at Randall’s Island

 

Andre Agassi of Boston Lobsters-Post-Match On-Court interview 719201 World TeamTennis at Randall’s Island

 

 

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Champions Series Tennis Circuit renamed PowerShares Series

InsideOut Sports + Entertainment announced on Friday that the Champions Series tennis circuit has been renamed the PowerShares Series. As the marketing agent for PowerShares QQQ Trust, an ETF based on the NASDAQ 100 index, Invesco PowerShares signed a multi-year agreement in 2011 to become the title sponsor of the InsideOut owned tennis tour.

 

The PowerShares Series will feature Andre Agassi, Pete Sampras, John McEnroe, Jimmy Connors, Jim Courier and other Grand Slam winners competing in twelve one-night tournaments across the United States this fall. Each PowerShares Series tournament will showcase four of the legendary players playing in two, 1-set semifinals followed by a 1-set championship match.

 

The champions will compete for a prize pool totaling $1 million to be shared by the top three finishers at the conclusion of the season. Pete Sampras finished the 2011 season as the #1 ranked player, followed by Jim Courier and Andre Agassi.

 

Event details, including ticket information, player fields, dates and venues, will be announced this summer.

 

“We look forward to a fantastic season of PowerShares Series tennis,” said Jon Venison, founding partner of InsideOut Sports + Entertainment. “With legendary players competing across the United States this fall, PowerShares Series events will bring top flight tournament tennis and star power to the greatest sporting arenas in the country.”

 

“The name change to PowerShares Series tennis reflects our ongoing support for this highly successful tour which has garnered valuable exposure for PowerShares QQQ,” said Jason Schoepke, Chief Marketing Officer at Invesco PowerShares. “We are confident the 2012 PowerShares Series tennis circuit will continue to advance the PowerShares brand with our core audiences and look forward to this year’s events.”

 

The PowerShares Series is a tennis circuit for champion tennis players over the age of 30, created in 2005 by InsideOut Sports + Entertainment, the New York based firm which is co-owned and operated by former SFX executive Jon Venison and former world No. 1 Jim Courier.

 

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Tennis Night in America Spokesman McEnroe Says There is “Work to Be Done” To Get Kids into Tennis

Seven-time major champion and native New Yorker John McEnroe will serve as the spokesman for Tennis Night in America. Tennis Night in America is an annual celebration of tennis since 2009 that includes youth registration events at facilities around the country and is highlighted by the fifth annual BNP Paribas Showdown at Madison Square Garden on March 5 featuring former number ones Caroline Wozniacki against Maria Sharapova followed by Andy Roddick taking on Roger Federer. It’s a team effort between the United States Tennis Association (USTA), StarGames, Inc., and MSG Sports to celebrate of tennis.

 

The evening’s events will begin with local children in a 10 and Under Tennis demonstration. Similar to other children’s sports where equipment and playing fields are scaled down to size for kids, 10 and Under Tennis gives the younger players the chance to be successful initially by playing tennis on smaller courts, using smaller and lighter racquets and slower-moving and lower-bouncing balls.

 

As part of his duties as spokesman this year, McEnroe lead a youth tennis clinic with children from the New York Junior Tennis League (NYJTL) on Wednesday afternoon February 29, 2012 at the Sportime facility on Randalls Island. McEnroe who runs his own tennis academy at the same facility talked about encouraging children to take up tennis:”I have been long in trying to get as many kids as possible to play this sport. A lot of people are trying to think out of the box that the game has been inaccessible and not affordable enough so it’s nice to see kids get an opportunity to play. The more that we can do that the better chance we’ll have with success in the future. Maybe kids thinking that they actually want to play tennis perhaps before other sports.”

 

“We need to find some of the kids that have turned to the other sports – football’s an obvious one, even soccer, basketball and try to get these kids to look at tennis, that’s something I want to do and obviously could afford to do it.”

 

In terms of player development, I asked McEnroe about what he and his academy are doing to help get children into the sport of tennis. He admits there is a lot of work to be done. “We are still trying to figure it out, McEnroe said.  And I believe it’s going to be an ongoing thing for the coming years.”

 

“You know we are right next to Harlem and I have been trying, and I’ve met with met with charter schools or schools that maybe have a different curriculum or public schools, but obviously my whole idea was to do things in the New York area close because it logistically gets to be a bigger and bigger problem the farther away you get. But we have this gold mine as far as I’m concerned, close by you know and a resource and we owe it to ourselves I think what we are trying to accomplish in the sport to try to do a better job of reaching out..that’s easier said than done.”

 

“I try to drum up enough corporate sponsorship so that I can afford to give as many kids as possible who can’t afford to play the chance to play, that cost money. The people that started this academy spent 19 million dollars building the facility. So my guess is that they don’t want to lose that money. So there is this fine line.

 

“You’ve got a ride, this is a business. This is owned by the city. The city benefits from it. (The) Randalls Island Sports foundation benefits. They are getting a significant sum of money every year, more than anyone else is getting here. So again it’s the way you look at things.

 

“When I came into tennis – was the sport too expensive – yes. Is it still too expensive now – yes.

 

“I think that my goal since I’ve been fortunate to get a lot from the sport through the years would be to try make this sport sort of thought in the same what that some kid maybe the next Michael Jordan, maybe, that he might say ‘you know something I think I want to play tennis instead of basketball.’ That’s sort of like my goal that we could have kids that think ‘hey this is cool’ not like ‘oh god tennis.’ So this is a battle, you know fighting for ever since I was a kid and will continue to fight.

 

“So certainly we all could do more and we want to do more. When you get into specifics, it’s easier said than done. But were definitely out there, you know looking for ways to get the buzz back. My goal at the very beginning was to get the buzz back to the sport. It’s a sport that’s given me a lot,

 

“Athletics is getting shortchanged in school, even in private schools, even where I went. I can only imagine how bad it is in public if private is as bad as it is. You know they don’t give the time for kids, there’s so much stress. Kids need a release to me. They need to get out there, and whether it may be art, they might love that, they may love music, but to me sports is a great way to have a great release and hopefully we can provide that too.”

 

Continuing to promote junior tennis and 10 and under tennis across America is a key to the future of the sport noted McEnroe. “Tennis Night in America brings focus to all of this so I am excited to be a part of it.”

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Federer Joins 1000 Match Club with Straight Set Win Over Del Potro to Advance to Semis

MELBOURNE PARK, Australia – Roger Federer joined the exclusive 1000 matches played club with his 6-4, 6-3, 6-2 win over Juan Martin Del Potro in the quarterfinals of the Australian Open.  This will mark the ninth consecutive year that Federer has advanced to the Australian Open semifinals. The Swiss joins the ranks of Jimmy Connors, Ivan Lendl, Guillermo Vilas, Andre Agassi, Stephan Edberg, Illie Nastase and John McEnroe who have played in 1000 matches or more.

On achieving the milestome, Federer said, “Well, 1000 matches, not 1000 wins.  Big difference.

“I wish it was 1000 wins, but I’m happy with 1000 matches in total, too.  It’s nice to win this one.  I mean, eventually I will forget which was one was my 1000th match and someone will remind me again.

I do not remember my 500, and that was the US Open final against Agassi.  No bigger matches than those ones.

“It’s a big milestone, I agree.  It’s a lot of matches and a lot tennis.  Either I have been around for a long time or I’m extremely fit.  You decide which way you want to describe it.  I don’t know.  But I’m happy.”

“We have played some big matches against each other,” Federer said of his match with Del Potro.  “So just knowing how well he’s been playing as of late, I was just hoping that I would get off a good start.  But I was able to mix it up well and control the ball, and right away sort of felt confident, which then sort of helped me to use all aspects of my game.

“Then it got tough with the shadow creeping in, and I knew that was going to happen rather sooner than later just because the matches before me took some time.  I knew it was going to happen eventually.  That’s why the second set, serving out the second set was key for me.  You know, get through that tough patch, and then in the third it was a bit more free swinging for me.

The almost two hour match saw Federer hit 38 winners with an 89% first serve percentage.

For the first time since 2005, Federer is on the same side of the draw at a major as Rafael Nadal. Federer will face the winner of the Nadal-Tomas Berdych quarterfinal on Tuesday night  in the semis for a spot in the Australian Open final.

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McEnroe-Borg Matchup Raises $300,000+ For Johnny Mac Tennis Project

 

John McEnroe photo by Fred Mullane

By Jerry Milani

NEW YORK (July 19, 2011) – The John McEnroe Tennis Academy today announced that more than $300,000 was raised from last Thursday night’s World TeamTennis match between the New York Sportimes, captained by John McEnroe and the Philadelphia Freedoms.  The highlight of the night was a singles matchup between legends McEnroe and Bjorn Borg, which McEnroe won 5-4. A sellout crowd attended the night at SPORTIME Randall’s Island, the home of the Academy and the Sportimes.  The funds raised will benefit the Johnny Mac Tennis Project, which provides scholarships, coaching, tournament travel and introductory programs for area youth who would not otherwise have the opportunity to attend the Academy or to participate in recreational tennis programs.

Bjorn Borg photo by Fred Mullane

“We are very pleased that the fundraising night in connection with an exciting World TeamTennis match was able to both bring in critical dollars and to show so many people our facility for the first time,” Academy Director Mark McEnroe said.  “The Academy’s first year of operation has gone very well, and we are confident that these funds will help us increase our reach to many kids who have the interest but not the wherewithal to join our mission of bringing well-rounded, athletic kids from all walks of life into the game of tennis.”

The Academy approach encourages students to continue their individual schooling during normal school hours and supports kids continuing to participate in other sports.  Full and partial scholarship money is available for qualified and promsing young players  who cannot afford the full tuition. Corporate partners Nike and Dunlop are providing students with equipment and apparel for use both at the Academy and when tournament play begins.  Former ATP, Olympic and Israeli Davis Cup player Gilad Bloom is the Academy’s lead pro, supervising a team of over 30 instructors. John McEnroe himself is routinely involved in daily instruction and provides strategic direction for all Academy business. The Academy’s first year of operation exceeded expectations with over 600 local boys and girls enrolled.  The second year of Academy training will begin in September.

SPORTIME Randall’s Island, which opened in 2009, is the flagship of Sportime’s 13 tennis, fitness and sports clubs across New York State, which serve over 25,000 tennis and fitness members and an additional 10,000 junior players. The Randall’s Island facility has 20 indoor/Outdoor Deco-Turf and Har-Tru courts, all enclosed during the indoor season and lighted for evening play.  The facility also has a 20,000 square foot clubhouse, a computer/study lounge and a state-of-the-art fitness and training center.

The SPORTIME facility is part of the rebirth of Randall’s Island, located just off the East Side Manhattan below the RFK Bridge.  The facilities on the island now include Icahn Stadium, a state-of-the-art track and field facility, nearly 70 baseball, soccer and softball fields, and a renovated Golf Center. The Randall’s Island Sports Foundation manages the Island on behalf of the NYC Department of Parks and Recreation.  SPORTIME operates the tennis center pursuant to a 20 year license agreement with the City of New York, Parks and the Randall’s Island Sports Foundation.
For details on the Academy, visit http://www.johnmcenroetennisacademy.com .

For additional information about SPORTIME, visit http://www.sportimeny.com .

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McEnroe Edges Borg But Philadelphia Freedoms Rally To Top New York Sportimes

Bjorn Borg, John McEnroe photo ©Kenneth B. Goldberg

 

 

John McEnroe photo ©Kenneth B. Goldberg

 

Bjorn Borg photo © Kenneth B. Goldberg

Photos by Kenneth B. Goldberg

Story by Jerry Milani

NEW YORKJohn McEnroe edged Bjorn Borg, 5-4, but the visiting Philadelphia Freedoms rallied past the New York Sportimes, 21-19, in World TeamTennis action on Thursday night at Sportime on Randall’s Island.

Trailing, 17-16, Philadelphia sent Beatrice Capra up against Martina Hingis in the women’s singles competition, which Capra claimed, 5-2, to give the Freedoms the win.

Philadelphia’s mixed doubles tandem of Lisa Raymond and Nathan Healey opened the match with a 5-4 win over Katie O’Brien and Travis Parrott.  O’Brien and Hingis teamed to win women’s doubles, 5-2 over Raymond and Capra.  Healey and Brendan Evans evened the match with a 5-3 men’s doubles victory over McEnroe and Parrott, before McEnroe’s win over Borg gave the Sportimes a slim edge entering the final event.

New York (6-3) hosts Springfield on Friday, while Philadelphia (1-8) returns home to face Boston.

Proceeds from the match benefited the John McEnroe Tennis Project.

World TeamTennis
at New York
Philadelphia Freedoms 21, New York Sportimes 19
Mixed Doubles – Lisa Raymond/Nathan Healey (Phil.) d. Katie O’Brien /Travis Parrott, 5-4
Women’s Doubles – Martina Hingis/Katie O’Brien (N.Y.) d. Beatrice Capra/Lisa Raymond, 5-2
Men’s Doubles – Brendan Evans/Nathan Healey d. John McEnroe/Travis Parrott, 5-3
Men’s Singles – John McEnroe (N.Y.) d. Bjorn Borg, 5-4
Women’s Singles – Beatrice Capra (Phil.) d. Martina Hingis, 5-2

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