2014/12/19

Anderson Ousts Third Seed Wawrinka in Toronto

Stan Wawrinka

Stan Wawrinka

By Dave Gertler

 

(August 7, 2014) TORONTO – Big-serving South African Kevin Anderson has made the most of relatively cold and gusty conditions to upset 3rd seed Stanislas Wawrinka in their Rogers Cup round-of-16 match on Thursday. This is the second straight win Anderson has had over Wawrinka since the Swiss 29-year-old won the Australian Open in January.

 

“I’m very happy,” said Anderson to media, appearing fresh and unruffled by their one-hour, 44-minute exchange, “Any time beating one of the best guys in the world is a great feeling. Obviously it’s a big challenge walking out there.”

 

Both players exchanged breaks early on their way to a first-set tie-break, in which both players had set points, Anderson claiming it 10-8. “After going down that early break (in the first set),” said Anderson, “Stan gave me a couple of double faults and just allowed me back in the match, and from there, I thought I served really, really well. I couldn’t be more happy on that front.”

 

Anderson increased his first-serve percentage in the second set to 75%, serving 7 aces along the way, keeping the pressure firmly on Wawrinka’s service games. “When I’m taking care of my serve games,” said Anderson, “It just allows me to relax a little bit more, and I thought I did a good job especially in the second, when I wasn’t getting too many looks on his serve. Sometimes in the past, I’ve let that frustrate me a little bit, and today I just let it go, and stayed focused on my serve game.”

 

“I had some chance,” said Wawrinka, showing minimal alarm at his early exit to the unseeded world No.21, “I had set point. I had two, three times 0-30, and the chance I didn’t took, it was more about choosing the right shot to play. Did some mistake that I shouldn’t do, and that’s happened.”

 

In general, I’m feeling great,” said Wawrinka, who will now leave Toronto for Cincinnati to compete at the Western & Southern Open next week, “I’m feeling physically good. I’m moving well. I’m playing well. It’s just that I need more matches to be really at the top.”

 

Anderson will contest his first career quarterfinal in Canada against Grigor Dimitrov.

 

Dave Gertler is a tennis journalist, player and musician based in Sydney covering the Rogers Cup in Toronto for Tennis Panorama News. Follow his Twitter updates from the tournament on @TennisNewsTPN, follow him on his personal Twitter @davegertler,  read his blog,  and listen to his podcast, Tennis Days .

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Andy Murray and Novak Djokovic Move into Wimbledon Quarterfinals

 

 

(June 30, 2014) WIMBLEDON -Top seed Novak Djokovic and third seed Andy Murray are getting closer to a semifinal clash as both men reached the Wimbledon quarterfinals on Monday at the All England Club.

Defending champion Murray reached his seventh straight Wimbledon quarterfinal after beating Kevin Anderson of South Africa 6-4, 6-3, 7-6 (6) under a closed roof on Centre Court, after a rain delay in the second set forced the roof to be shut.

For the Scot Murray it’s his 17 straight match win at the All England club dating back to the 2012 Olympic Games in London.

The Serb Djokovic beat France’s Jo-Wilfried Tsonga for the 11th consecutive time with a 6-3, 6-4, 7-6 (5) win.

“I was just happy that I won the match,” Murray said.  “I was a bit disappointed with how I started under the roof.  The beginning, like I said, I was a little bit tentative.  Apart from that, that sort of three or four games when we came back out, I played well.

“I created many chances, gave him a few opportunities.  That’s what you need to do on grass court tennis.  You don’t always break.  But if you keep putting them under enough pressure, you’re going to get through in the end.”

“I knew I was going to get tested, you know, at some stage,” the Scot added.  “And, yeah, today I was pushed, especially in the middle part of that second set, then obviously later on in the third there were some tight moments.

“But I handled them fairly well.  It was a good match.”

“I think he was moving great,” Anderson said of Murray’s play.  “That’s a big part of his game.  I think especially on the grass I think that’s a big contributor to why he’s had so much success on this surface.”

Murray will face No. 11. Grigor Dimitrov in his quarterfinal. Dimitrov defeated Leonardo Mayer 6-4, 7-6 (6), 6-2.

“It’s a step up because it’s one round further, and the guys that are in the quarterfinals are going to be playing top tennis,” Murray said about his encounter with the Bulgarian.  “He obviously won Queen’s a couple weeks ago.  He likes the grass courts.

“Yeah, it’s a big opportunity for him, as well, playing on the Centre Court, the courts at Wimbledon for the first time.

“Yeah, it’s a great opportunity for him.  Hopefully we can play a good match.”

 

“I’m happy that I’m in the quarterfinal match,” Dimitrov said.  “Just going to give credit to myself for that.  But my job isn’t over yet.

“So I’m excited to get on the court tomorrow.  Just go through my regular routines, through all the gears, you know, come on Wednesday.”

 

“I’m just going to play my game,” Dimitrov added.  “I’m not going to step back.  I just want to come out with my big game and play my aggressive tennis.”

 

“I was aware of his qualities, especially on this surface,” Djokvic said of his match with Tsonga.  “He looked, before the match, very determined to play his best and very focused.

“I think I did really well from the start to the end, especially in the third set where I thought he elevated his level of game and he started serving very high percentage first serve, very strong, all angles.

“It was difficult to get the return back in play, but managed to save a couple break points, crucial ones, get myself in the tiebreak and wait for the opportunity to be presented.

“We both served very well in the tiebreak, and the only opportunity I had was on second serve on 6-5, and I used it.  I went for the shot.

“Yeah, I’m just glad that I didn’t allow him to go into the fourth set, because he started to use obviously the crowd support.  And, you know, I knew that he’s going to do that because he’s the kind of player that feeds off the energy, so it was very important for me to get this done in straight sets.”

Djokovic will play Marin Cilic for a place in the semifinals.

“I will try to stick to the kind of a game plan that I had against Marin in the previous occasions,” Djokovic said.

“I am aware of the fact, as well, that since he started working with Goran Ivanesevic that he has improved, especially in his service department, where for his height I thought that he didn’t use his full potential up to now work with Goran, where it’s evident that it works well for him.

“Especially on the grass it serves as a great weapon.  He won here in straight sets against Chardy and Berdych and some very good players.

“So it says enough about his quality play in this tournament.”

Stan Wawrinka was finally able to complete his third round match on Monday. Rain on Saturday delayed his chance to play.

The No. 1 Swiss will face 19th seed Feliciano Lopez in the fourth round. Lopez dismissed the last American man in the singles draw, Ninth seed John Isner, 6-7 (8), 7-6 (6), 7-6 (3), 7-5, despite the American hitting 52 aces.

“Tough match to play,” Lopez said.

“As I said before, I knew it’s going to be like this.  I knew we going to play a lot of tiebreaks, so this is the match I was excepting to play.

“Luckily I made it.  I’m very happy to went through.  It was a very difficult one for me today.”

With Isner beaten and Madison Keys withdrawing from the tournament with an injury, it’s the first time since 1911 that no Americans have reached the round of 16 at Wimbledon.

Asked about this fact, Isner said, “Didn’t know that. Don’t really care either.”

Keys was forced to pull out of the tournament with a left adductor injury.

On the women’s side of the draw, the conqueror of Serena Williams has been knocked out of Wimbledon.

Canada’s Eugenie Bouchard, the 13th seed defeated Alize Cornet 7-6 (5), 7-5 to reach the quarterfinals.

“I think we played some good tennis today, “Bouchard said.  “You know, we had some tough points.  She has good wheels.  So I had to really try and finish off the point.

“You know, I think it made for some really tough, physical points.  So that’s definitely the most physical match I’ve played I think this tournament.

“But I’m proud that I really, really fought till the end.  She’s a good fighter, too.  We were really just battling.”

“This is what I’ve worked so hard for, to be in the quarters at Wimbledon,” Bouchard said. “But I want to go another step. I want to keep going.”

Bouchard will play the winner of the fourth round match between Maria Sharapova and Angelique Kerber.

Bouchard spoke briefly about playing both of these women:

“I think she’s a great player,” Bouchard said of Sharapova.  “She, you know, tries to be aggressive like I try to be aggressive as well.  So I think, you know, I’m going to go in and try to battle and go for my shots.  We had a tough match recently at the French Open.  But that’s the past.  So it’s a new match.  If I were to play her, I would just be very excited and really try to go for it.”

“Kerber I played at the French as well.  I played both opponents recently.  Of course with her she’s a lefty so you keep that in mind with tactics.  I played well last time against her because I was really trying to go for it.  Whenever I had an opening, I would really go for it.  I would keep my basic game against both players.”

Three players from the Cazech Republic are among the women’s quarterfinalists – 2011 Wimbledon champion Petra Kvitova, Lucie Safarova and unseeded Barbora Zahlavova Strycova.

Zahlavova Strycova, who beat No. 2 Li Na, defeated No. 16 Caroline Wozniacki 6-2, 7-5 to reach her first Grand Slam quarterfinal. Back in April 2013, she completed serving a a six-month doping ban after testing positive for the stimulant sibutramine.

“I can’t believe it for right now,” Zahlavova Strycova sid about the win and reaching the quarterfinals.  “It’s great.  I mean, it was a tough match obviously, and I had to make a fifth match point.

“I’m really, really happy that I could win today.”

She spoke about the six month ban to press: “First of all, I didn’t wanted to play again because I felt like it’s a little bit unfair.  Everything was kind of against.

“So first two months I didn’t want to come back.  Then I missed it.  I missed the feeling of working out, the feeling of winning matches, and being on tour.

“It was tough, but on the other hand, it also brings me some positive things.  Like I say, I am seeing the sport a little bit different now.

“And here I am.”

Last year’s finalist Sabine Lisicki ousted 11th seed Ana Ivanovic 6-4, 3-6, 6-1 to reach the fourth round in a match carried over from Saturday.

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After the Clay, a Pain in the Grass

 

By Wendy M. Grossman

 

(June 13, 2014) LONDON – The most spectacular day of tennis every year is the first day of Queen’s Club. The day before is the French Open final, the culmination of months of looking at crushed-brick courts and players knocking the burnt-orangey dust out of the treads on their shoes. The next morning the courts are bright emerald-green and everything old is new again. It’s grass season.

 

The difficulty of the shift is underlined by the abrupt change in cast. All of a sudden, the tour is awash in tall, skinny beanpoles whopping down serves from the height of a basketball hoop. Physically, even the best-adapted grass-court player pays a price for the change.

 

“My back,” said Kevin Anderson, when asked what body part hurts the most. He explains: the ball stays definitely lower. At 6 foot 8, Anderson has to bend a lot anyway – but the need is more pronounced on grass, and he has to reach more and farther because of the way grass can skid a ball away from you. “I feel it more on grass.” Apparently he’s happy to help dish out the pain, naming the backhand slice, which notoriously stays low and skids off the grass, as the shot he most needs to get in gear for the grass season.

 

Andy Murray, coming off his third-round loss to Radek Stepanek, noted the “little pains” because of the change of surface (while not blaming them for the loss). You use different muscles, and you use them differently, he said, than on clay, where he finds that the sliding makes his quads hurt most. On grass, he says his lower back, butt, and hamstrings “can get a bit stiff”.

 

Stanislas Wawrinka said, “You have to be lower on your feet, and sometimes the knee or the back can be difficult. But this year was OK. I had time to adapt myself.”

 

Grigor Dimitrov, because of his early loss at the French Open, has also had more time to adjust than some of the others. He said he spent last week running 25 miles, which, he says, has added up: “the quads, the glutes”. In general, he says, “I think the part that really hurts the most on grass is the lower back, the glutes, and the adductors. I think those are the parts that always, even if you play the shortest two sets, the next day you’re gonna come back and feel a little funky.”

 

What seems to definitely help is experience. Radek Stepanek, who beat Murray in the third round and followed up by downing Anderson in the quarters, said “I know exactly which muscles are going to hurt me after the first two days on grass. I’m protecting them already before coming here with the prevention exercises.” The issue for him, he said, is glutes and lower back. Despite the preventive work he does, though, he said wryly, “It always comes anyway, but you know, I’m trying to adjust the level of pain, you know, as low as I can.”

 

Leave it to Dimitrov to put the whole thing in perspective: “[I] don’t really care any more, because with or without pain, it doesn’t really matter.”

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Kevin Anderson Upsets Aussie Champ Stan Wawrinka At The BNP Paribas Open

anderson-wawrinka-shake-water

By Kevin Ware

(March 12, 2014) INDIAN WELLS – With a strong first-round win over Ivo Karlovic, and the loss of just two games to Andreas Seppi, it was a foregone conclusion that Australian Open champion Stanislas Wawrinka would stretch his win streak to 14 matches for a spot in the BNP Paribas Open quarterfinals.

His opponent, Kevin Anderson of South Africa, had other plans; knocking out the World No. 3 in three sets 7-6(1), 3-6, 6-1. Anderson had previously lost to Wawrinka in their three previous meetings, but felt good about his chances in today’s R16 match because they were all closely-contested. This was particularly true of their last meeting at the 2013 Shanghai Masters.

Wawrinka won that tough three-setter by the slimmest of margins in a third-set tiebreak, 6-4, 3-6, 7-6(5).  One of the lessons that Anderson learned from that match was the need to be more aggressive. This was evident from the start with an early break of the Wawrinka serve.

“That was my game plan coming out.  I had played Stan a few times before, most recently in Shanghai last year, and just being quite aggressive and not giving him too much rhythm from the back.”

That aggressive play was almost his undoing as his error count rose in the second set. It didn’t help that Wawrinka, appearing injured and on the brink of retirement at the end of the first set, came back from the brink to win the second set.

An awkward lunge at a backhand initially led to some tense moments as Wawrinka armed serves and swatted at backhands with limited range of movement. Wawrinka said, “It’s just tightness. And I was a little bit nervous and tight and tired.”

When asked if he’d thought of retiring, he brushed aside the injury talk. “No, never.  As I said, the injury was not big problem at all.  Not at all.  Because I won the second set after.”

“I think I was negative all the match.  I was complaining a lot about my serve, about the way I was playing, and with that, I don’t deserve to win matches. I think I should have been more positive with myself, just trying to find solution, because it was still a close match.”

Anderson got back on track in the third set, but can’t be happy with the stats sheet. He served 11 aces against 8 double faults, and a whopping 40 unforced errors against 34 winners. Still, he continues a run of good form that has seen him play some of the best tennis of his career.

Anderson struggled mightily with injury issues (and surgeries) just a few years ago. Now that the worst is behind him, he attributes much of his current success to having a few relatively healthy years to work on his game. “I have really put as much emphasis as I can on giving myself the right amount of breaks and, really fortunately, being in the position where I can pick and choose my tournaments has helped a lot.”

“Staying healthy is such an important thing.  It sounds obvious, but if you’re not at 100% it’s really tough to compete. ”

Anderson will have his hands full with his next opponent, Roger Federer. But he feels more than up to the challenge.

“I have to come out and focus on my game and just do what I have been doing.  I feel like I have been playing good tennis, and I’m going to definitely continue that tomorrow.”

Kevin Ware is in Indian Wells covering theBNP Paribas Open for Tennis Panorama News. Follow his live updates on twitter @TennisNewsTPN.  Follow his personal twitter @SFTennisFreak.

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John Isner Wins Atlanta Open

Haas d Isner semifinal (4 of 5)

(July 28, 2013) In a battle between two of the tallest players in tennis, six-foot-10 John Isner saved two match points to beat six-foot-8 Kevin Anderson 6-7(3), 7-6(2), 7-6(2) in the final of the BB&T Atlanta Open on Sunday to claim his seventh ATP World Tour title.

Neither player was able to break serve during the entire almost three hour match. Anderson failed to convert any of 11 break point chances against Isner. At 2 hours and 54 minutes it’s the longest three-set final on the ATP tour this year.

“This is a tournament where I could’ve been out in my first match,” Isner said. I lived on the edge all week and seemed to come through each and every time. It’s very encouraging.

“I’ve been on the wrong end of a final that close before, so it feels good to be on the other end of that. I never wavered. I believed that even at 0/40 that I could still hold on and was able to come up with the goods.”

“There’s no question I play my best in the U.S. This is where I’m very comfortable. I compete extra hard and things seems to work out for me when I’m playing in the U.S.”

“I was holding easily and trying to give myself chances, which I did,” Anderson said. “Just wasn’t able to capitalize on them. That was the difference today… He stays in there. He serves well, he plays well when it matters, and he definitely played two better tie-breaks than me.”

Isner took home a check for $98,700 as the winner. Isner lost in the finals of the Atlanta Open in 2010, and 2011, each time to Mardy Fish.

Of Isner’s seven career ATP World Tour titles, three have come after saving match point and winning in a third set tiebreak – ’10 Auckland, ’12 Winston-Salem,  and ’13 Atlanta.

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A Tale of Two Giants

John Isner-2
(July 27, 2013) ATLANTA, GA – The tallest final in history will go down at this year’s BB&T Atlanta Open. John Isner standing at 6’10” and Kevin Anderson at 6’8″ is a recipe for a serving war. Predicting the winner of this match is no easy task. Head to head, here are the stats that count.

Isner vs. Anderson

Aces 463 409

Double Faults 48 120

1st Serve Points Won 77% 75%

Break Points Faced 166 237

Break Points Saved 69% 65%

Service Games Won 88% 85%

Ist Serve Return Points Won 24% 30%

Break Opportunities 165 287

Break Points Converted 35% 39%

John Isner has an edge in aces, double faults, and break points faced while Kevin Anderson’s numbers are better in 1st serve return points won, break opportunities

and break points converted. In short, John may serve better, but Kevin returns better. Who’s going to win this match, your guess is as good as mine but I’ll make mine

anyway. With Isner leading the tour with the tiebreak record of 23-6 and the crowd behind him, my gut says Isner in 3 tie breaks, but I’m not putting my money on it!

 

By Tina Taylor-Brown, Special to Tennis Panorama

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Robredo wins Casablanca

 

(April 14, 2013) Spain’s Tommy Robredo captured his first title since Santiago in February 2011 with a 7-6(6), 4-6, 6-3 win over Kevin Anderson for the Casablanca crown. The 72nd ranked Robredo missed five months in 2012 due to a leg injury and fell to No. 471 in the world in the rankings.

For Robredo the victory was his 10th tournament title on clay.

“I have been practicing very well during a month in Barcelona before coming here, “ Robredo said. “I knew that I could play a good tournament here and you never know what can happen. I went match by match and kept winning. Today, I was pretty nervous since this is very important for me. I really wanted to win this. I’m very happy to win a title again after my injury. It’s just great! Those points will help me a lot in the ranking. The goal is to arrive in Roland Garros in the best form possible. After that I will sit down and have a look at my goals.”

Anderson who was playing in his first clay court final, spoke about his chances during the match.

“I thought I was in control of the match,” said the South African. “I had a lot of chances in the first set. I played a loose game to give the break back. And then in the tie-break at 6-all, I played two loose points. I came back and did well in the second. In the third, I had some good momentum, but after suddenly being up, I was down a break. I gave myself some chances to get back in the match. Obviously I’m not too happy with the errors I made on those two break points. But there are a lot of positives, which is the main thing I got to look at, as disappointing as it was not to have won it. It’s a good start for me on clay. There are still a lot of tournaments.”

 

RESULTS – SUNDAY, 14 APRIL, 2013

Singles – Final
T Robredo (ESP) d [2] K Anderson (RSA) 76(6) 46 63

Doubles – Final
[1] J Knowle (AUT) / F Polasek (SVK) d D Brown (GER) / C Kas (GER) 63 62

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Berdych Moves into BNP Paribas Open Semifinal with Win over Anderson

Berdych 1 31

(March 14, 2013) Czech Tomas Berdych continued his run at the BNP Paribas Open without dropping a set with his defeat of South Africa’s Kevin Anderson 6-4, 6-4 to move into the semifinals of Indian Wells on Thursday.

For Berdych, it’s the first time he’s reached this stage at the BNP Paribas Open.

Berdych says he’s making his way towards the top 4.  “Well, I think I’m getting closer, but those guys are still running away, Berdych told media. “I don’t know how they do it, but it’s really, really tough, you know.

“If you look at the guys who are there, it’s really, you know, very tough time.  But, you know, it doesn’t change anything for me.  I mean, I just trying to focus myself, trying to go one by one, either if it’s weeks or the matches.

“So, really, go day by day and, you know, also trying to be patient in that as well.  You know, hopefully one day I can sit and say, Yeah, all that hard work has been, you know, paying off, you know, that I was able to move, even improve the ranking or make a really big results, Grand Slam or some other, and so that’s my actually key and motivation.

Berdych will face the winner of Thursday nights’ Roger FedererRafael Nadal match.

“Well, my position is great, “ said the Czech.  “I’m in the semifinal and I can, you know, just lie in my bed, turn on the TV, and just watching the guys that they’re gonna play.

“So I cannot be in better position than that.  Well, my thoughts on that match, I mean, I think everybody knows who I would prefer to play.

But this is a sport, this is tennis, they will go there, and they will try to fight for the win.  The better is gonna wait for me next day.

“Yeah, need to get ready if it’s Roger or Rafa and try to bring my best game again.”

Berdych spoke about his recent success against Federer.

“Well, I think it’s quite simple,” Berdych said.  “It’s the way what I play.  With my style I can do a bit more damage to Roger, you know, because I can take, you know, his I’d say comfort on the court away and he starts to be more under pressure.

“And then, you know, that’s the way when he doesn’t feel, you know, that optimum and that good on court.  I’m not saying that I’m expert to beat him, but I’m trying to do my best to win the matches with him.  You know, in the past at least it’s been working.

“With Rafa, it’s way different, you know.  With his, you know, lefty hand and heavy spins, it’s very tough, you know, especially in these conditions.  If it’s going to be hot like this, yeah, it’s could be very, very tough one.

“But, you know, one day I hope that I’m going to find the way how to beat him again, and why not here?”

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Nadal, Federer, Hampton, Keys and Anderson on Notes and Quotes from the BNP Paribas Open

 Jamie Hampton

(March 9, 2013) INDIAN WELLS, CA – a few quotes from post-match news conferences from the BNP Paribas Open.

 

Jamie Hampton calls herself “boring.”

 

Q.  And you’re a little bit under the radar screen.  If someone came up to you and said, Hey, what’s the coolest thing about Jamie Hamilton, what would you say?

JAMIE HAMPTON:  I’m pretty boring, actually.  I wouldn’t consider myself cool at all.

Q.  Oh, come on.

JAMIE HAMPTON:  No, really.

Q.  Why is that?

JAMIE HAMPTON:  My life pretty much revolves around tennis.  I eat, sleep, and dink tennis.  There is not too much time for anything else for me.

I have to take care of my back and body.  That’s a full‑time job in itself.  To add tennis on top of that…

Q.  In the small sliver of time that you’re spending that you’re not playing tennis, what are you doing?

JAMIE HAMPTON:  Sleeping.

Q.  TV, sleeping?  Do you know who won the Oscar for best picture?

JAMIE HAMPTON:  Argon.

Q.  Close.  Argo.

JAMIE HAMPTON:  Argo.  I said Argon, didn’t I?  Dang it.  Okay.

 Madison Keys Tennis Panorama

 

Madison Keys on baking and candy.

 

Q.  Outside of listening to every country music station that’s on the radio, what do you do on your off time when you’re not killing yourself on the court?

MADISON KEYS:  I love baking, which I have to get it out of my house as soon as I bake it or else I’m going to eat it all.  But I like baking.  I have little sisters, so I hang out with them all the time, so…

I feel like I don’t really have off time, though.  When I do have off time I’m usually having to do homework still, so…

Q.  Favorite go‑to dish baking‑wise?

MADISON KEYS:  Oreo cheesecake cupcakes.  They’re so good.

Q.  Is that the one you put on your Facebook?

MADISON KEYS:  Those were just cupcakes.  The Oreo cheesecake cupcakes you put an Oreo on the bottom and fill the top with Oreo cheesecake.  They’re just in little muffin tins.  They’re delicious.

Q.  So when you break through and win a big, big tournament, will you promise to give us a round of cheesecake?

MADISON KEYS:  I was actually going to make them in Miami and bring them.  If I see you around, I will give you one.

Q.  Ever tried Sugarpova before?

MADISON KEYS:  I have, and it’s delicious.  Every time I see Max walking around with a bag of it, I’m like, Is there one for me?

Q.  Can you imagine getting a little of Maria’s candy into your baking?

MADISON KEYS:  That could be good.  Now I’m going to think about it.

 anderson600400

Kevin Anderson a member of the ATP Council on the 25-second rule

 

KEVIN ANDERSON:  Well, we’ll be meeting next week in Miami, so we will be getting an update on that.

I think it’s a good rule.  I think it’s always tough because it’s not like ‑‑ I mean, you have to sometimes take into consideration, you know, extenuating circumstances.  If you play like an incredibly long point or the ball kids ‑‑ maybe the ball goes out or something.

Just from the standpoint I think it’s a good rule.  It makes it fair for everybody.  But I have heard ‑‑ as the year has gone on, some guys are saying it’s getting a bit more lax.  There aren’t as many time violations going on out there.  I just heard a couple guys saying with different matches some people are sticking to the rule and some people aren’t.

It’s a work in progress, so hopefully after Miami we will be able to sort of assess where it’s at and see what other people are feeling.  I mean, just have to go from there.

Asked about if he’s in favor of a shot clock

 

KEVIN ANDERSON:  Yeah, and when we implemented the rule at the US Open we chatted about that a bit, whether there is an affordability issue.

Also, I don’t think it’s ‑‑ it’s one of those things where there are sometimes circumstances that come up that you do need more than the 25 seconds that’s out of your control.

But if there is a shot clock there it might make things trickier.  I don’t think it’s like basketball where the time continues all the time.  You are waiting for other people.  That would be something we’d have to have a trial or something to see how that would work out.

 Roger Federer-001

Federer on Nadal

 

Q.  What will be a sign on a hard court that he’s (Nadal) playing well?  Anything in particular?

ROGER FEDERER:  Progressing in the draw.  (Laughter.)

 

Yeah, wins don’t lie.

 

Nadal

Nadal on hardcourts and Federer

 

 

Q.  Here in America it’s hard court, hard court, hard court.  Do you think there should be more clay court tournaments?

RAFAEL NADAL:  I don’t want to say that, because anything that I will say not gonna affect in my career.  That’s not going to change during the years that I will be playing, no?

I think it’s more medical things than players think.  Hard courts are aggressive for the body.

If for the next generations wants to have longer careers and want to finish his careers with better conditions physically, that’s my humble opinion.  ATP have to find a solution and not continue playing more and more tournaments on this surface that is the harder one for the joints and for the knees, for the foot, for the ankles, for the back, for everything.

Q.  You’re the main one who talks about hard courts and wanting to have more tournaments not on hard courts.  Not as many as the other top players discuss that.  Do you think that a lot of players discuss your opinion, or do you think it’s more your personal experience, more you than other people?

RAFAEL NADAL:  Depends.  If you will ask a player who plays fantastic on this court is a thing that ‑‑ sorry.  At the end, we are here.  At the end, it’s an individual game.  At the end, everybody thinks for himself.

And if somebody plays great on this surface, it’s difficult to go against this surface, no?  Is normal that if the volume of the tournaments on hard are more than in the rest of the surfaces, is normal than like the top players of the world, best players of the world, are specialists on hard courts.

So they not gonna go against the hard court.  That’s why I say is not another players’ thing, it’s a medical thing.  Somebody have to think not for today.  I repeat:  I’m not talking about my career.  My career is done.

We gonna finish my career playing on the same or more tournaments on hard, because that’s the dynamic.

But, yes, no, my opinion is for the next generations that something have to change.

 

Q.  Is it kind of amazing how healthy Roger has stayed throughout his career, considering all the hard court tennis he’s played?

RAFAEL NADAL:  No.  It’s amazing?  I don’t think so.  I think, you know, he’s very good.  Don’t take my words because my English is not perfect, no?  But I think he’s very lucky to have this talent, no?  The talent of Roger is amazing, and the things that he’s able to do it, you know, the rest of the ‑‑ all the players, we are not able to play this way.

He win a lot of matches with, you know, short points; win a lot of matches with the serve, with one forehand.

So, you know, that’s why he’s able to keep having big, you know, big career and very long.

That’s amazing thing that’s have a lot of value.  No, nothing to say about that.  He’s great, and for many reason he’s the best of the history, no?

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Anderson Tops No. 4 Ferrer

 

David Ferrer

David Ferrer

(March 9, 2013) World No. 4 David Ferrer became the first major casualty of the BNP Paribas Open on Saturday when the Spaniard fell to big-serving South African Kevin Anderson 3-6, 6-4, 6-3.

Ferrer who already has captured two ATP World this season was demolished in the final of the Mexican Open by compatriot Rafael Nadal.

Ferrer gave credit to his opponent. “He was better than me, “Ferrer said.  “He serve better.”

“Well, of course I am disappoint(ed), no, because I lost in first round,” he continued.

“But this is tennis, and it’s impossible to win always.  Kevin Anderson was better than me.  What can I do?”

Anderson broke Ferrer four times and won 70% of his first serve points with six aces.

“It was fantastic,” Anderson said of the win. “Obviously David is a great player, and especially in the last few years he’s really stepped it up.  Beating a top 5 in the world player is always ‑‑ it’s a great feeling, and especially somebody like David who doesn’t go away.

“I mean, he fights for everything; doesn’t give you everything.  I felt I earned the win today.”

The win is very significant for the South African who is coming off  right elbow surgery after losing at the Australian Open.

“Everything else is completely fine, ” said Anderson.  “Just that extension on the serve gives it a little bit of pain, and it fatigues quite quickly.

“So right now just really serving on match days.  Taking it quite easy on days off.  Hopefully, you know, just as time goes on, doing a lot of the treatment and rehab, I will be able to slowly start increasing that load.”

Anderson will play face Finland’s Jarkko Nieminen next. The Finn destroyed Spaniard Fernando Verdasco 6-1, 6-0.

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