2014/09/20

A Consistent Murray Moves Past Teen Kyrgios in Toronto

Andy Murray

Andy Murray

 

By Dave Gertler

(August 6, 2014) TORONTO – Andy Murray has averted the potential threat coming from Nick Kyrgios at the Rogers Cup in Toronto on Wednesday. Back from his hiatus that commenced after he was ousted from the quarter-finals of Wimbledon, the world No. 9 appeared fresh and in rhythm, employing a mixture of rock-solid consistency and relentless pressure to weather the initial onslaught from the explosive Australian teenager, and ultimately move through to the round of 16.

 

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After both players exchanged holds of serve on Stadium Court, cracks began to appear in Kyrgios’ game. An unforced error-laden game saw him get broken for 1-2. “It was a solid match for a first match back after sort of four-and-a-half, five weeks. I was happy,” said Murray after the match, “I  thought I did most things pretty solid. I didn’t make too many errors. I moved well. High first-serve percentage.”

 

After a series of love-holds from both players, Murray struck again with a second break for 5-2, consolidating for the first set. After compound-fracturing his racquet at the tail-end of the first set, Kyrgios set about gaining a foothold in the second set, new racquet in hand.

 

But after both players held twice early in the second set, the 27-year-old wielded his experience over the 19-year-old, breaking him twice, sealing the next four games. The final scoreline of 6-2, 6-2 was achieved in 54 minutes. “He played way too good for me today,” said Kyrgios, who leaves tomorrow morning for Cincinnati to prepare to qualify for the Western & Southern Open, his last stop before the US Open later in August.  “I never felt comfortable out there. I felt awkward and wasn’t serving great, and he made me pay the price, so there’s a lot of things I can take away from that match today.”

 

To reach the second round, Kyrgios had to spring back from a set behind in the first-round against Colombian Santiago Giraldo yesterday, but Kyrgios said about today’s match. “I don’t think I can beat myself up too much,” said Kyrgios,”I haven’t played that much tennis at this sort of level yet. I’ve played a couple of grand slams, and this is only my third tour event, so it’s all new to me still, I’m getting used to it though.”

 

Having won the Rogers Cup twice before, Murray has not made it past the quarterfinals since 2010, and will now play Richard Gasquet in the round of 16, while Novak Djokovic will face Jo-Wilfried Tsonga in his third-round match. While Tsonga made it through his opponent, compatriot Jeremy Chardy, in straight sets on Grandstand Court, Djokovic found himself in a dire situation against another Frenchman, Gael Monfils. While it was the Serb world No.1 who made it through in the end, it was not without dropping a set to Monfils, both players electrifying the crowd with highlight-reel tennis over a devastating two hours and 40 minutes on Stadium Court, the final score going Djokovic’s way, 6-2, 6-7, 7-6(2).

 

Other winners to advance to the third round included Ivan Dodig, Marin Cilic, Julien Benneteau, Tommy Robredo and Kevin Anderson.

 

Dave Gertler is a tennis journalist, player and musician based in Sydney covering the Rogers Cup in Toronto for Tennis Panorama News. Follow his Twitter updates from the tournament on @TennisNewsTPN, follow him on his personal Twitter @davegertler,  read his blog,  and listen to his podcast, Tennis Days .

 

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Around the Grounds at the Rogers Cup Toronto

 

(August 3, 2014) TORONTO, CANADA – Photographer Nida Alibhai snapped photos all around the grounds of the Rogers Cup on Sunday, August 3, 2014.

Photos include: Roger Federer, Grigor Dimitrov, Andy Murray, Novak Djokovic, Bernard Tomic,Tomas Berdych, Feliciano Lopez and others.

Follow Nida Alibhai’s photo coverage of the tournament on Twitter @TennisNewsTPN.

 

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Novak Djokovic and Rafael Nadal to Headline U. S. Open

2011-US-Open-Tennis-Tournament

White Plains, N.Y., July 17, 2014 – The USTA announced that world No. 1 Novak Djokovic and defending champion Rafael Nadal lead the men’s singles field for the 2014 US Open Tennis Championships. The field features six former US Open champions, including Djokovic (2011), two-time champion Nadal (2010, 2013), five-time champion Roger Federer (2004-08), Andy Murray (2012), Juan Martin del Potro (2009) and Lleyton Hewitt (2001).

Each of the world’s top 104 men received direct entry into the US Open, representing 36 countries.

The 2014 US Open will be played August 25 through September 8 at the USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center in Flushing, N.Y. The US Open Men’s Singles Championship is presented by Mercedes-Benz.

Leading the entry list is Djokovic, the Serbian world No. 1 who has reached the US Open final every year since 2010. He won his seventh major title earlier this month at Wimbledon, beating Federer in five sets, after which he reclaimed the world No. 1 ranking from Nadal.

Nadal, the world No. 2, defeated Djokovic in four sets last year to win his second US Open championship, joining Federer (2007) as the only men to win the Emirates Airline US Open Series and US Open titles in the same year. This spring, the Spaniard won his record ninth French Open title, giving him 14 Grand Slam singles championships, tied with Pete Sampras for second all-time.

World No. 3 Federer, of Switzerland, is the all-time leader with 17 major singles titles, and was bidding for his eighth Wimbledon title this month before falling to Djokovic in the five-set final. Federer is competing for his sixth US Open title, which would surpass Pete Sampras and Jimmy Connors for the most US Open men’s singles titles in the Open Era.

Stanislas Wawrinka, the Swiss No. 4 and a 2013 US Open semifinalist, won his first major singles championship at the Australian Open this year, joining del Potro (2009 US Open) as the only men outside the “Big Four” of Djokovic, Nadal, Federer and Murray to win a Grand Slam since the 2005 French Open.

Filling out the field’s top 10 are No. 5 Tomas Berdych, of the Czech Republic, a 2012 US Open semifinalist and 2010 Wimbledon finalist; No. 6 Milos Raonic, of Canada, a 2014 Wimbledon semifinalist; No. 7 David Ferrer, of Spain, a French Open finalist (2013) and two-time US Open semifinalist (2007, 2012); No. 8 and 2009 US Open champion Juan Martin del Potro, of Argentina; No. 9 Grigor Dimitrov, of Bulgaria, a 2014 Wimbledon semifinalist; and No. 10 Andy Murray, the 2012 US Open champion and 2013 Wimbledon champion.

American men who received direct entry are No. 12 John Isner, of Greensboro, N.C., No. 62 Sam Querrey, of Las Vegas, Nevada, No. 64 Steve Johnson, of Orange, Calif., No. 69 Jack Sock, of Lincoln, Neb., No. 70 Donald Young, of Atlanta, and No. 77 Bradley Klahn, of Poway, Calif.

Germany’s Dustin Brown, ranked No. 104, is the last man to receive direct entry into the field of 128. No players used protected or special rankings to gain direct entry. Sixteen more players will gain entry through the US Open Qualifying Tournament, held August 19-22, while the eight remaining spots are wild cards awarded by the USTA.

Among the players competing in the US Open Qualifying Tournament will be the winner of the fifth annual US Open National Playoffs – Men’s Championship, held during the Emirates Airline US Open Series women’s event in New Haven, Conn., prior to the US Open Qualifying Tournament. The USTA created the US Open National Playoffs in 2010 to allow players 14 and older, regardless of playing ability or nationality, to vie for a spot in the US Open Qualifying Tournament via one of 13 sectional qualifying tournaments.

The July 14 edition of the Emirates ATP World Tour rankings was used to determine the US Open main draw entry list. Seeds will be determined and announced closer to the start of the event.

The 2014 US Open will mark the culmination of the Emirates Airline US Open Series, the North American summer season of eight ATP World Tour and WTA events that begin this Monday, July 21. The US Open is the highest-attended annual sporting event in the world and will again be televised domestically on CBS Sports, ESPN and Tennis Channel, with international coverage reaching more than 180 countries.

The 2014 US Open will be played from Monday, August 25 through Monday, September 8. Tickets can be purchased: at USOpen.org; by calling Ticketmaster at 1-866-OPEN-TIX; at all Ticketmaster outlets; at the box office at the USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center.

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Novak Djokovic Gets Married

 

(July 10, 2014) Associated Press is reporting that Wimbledon champion and world No. 1 Novak Djokovic married his Fiance Jelena Ristic on Thursday in a ceremony in Montenegro at a resort on the Adriatic coast.

Djokovic won his second Wimbledon title this past Sunday over Roger Federer in the final.

Djokovic and Ristic who first met in high school, have been together for ever 8 years. They are expecting their first child later this year.

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Djokovic Returns to No. 1, Qualifies for ATP World Tour Finals

 

 

(July 7, 2014) ATP World Tour – LONDON – Novak Djokovic today returns to No. 1 in the Emirates ATP Rankings for the first time since the week of 30 September 2013. And in a double reward for capturing his second Wimbledon title on Sunday, Djokovic has earned the right to play for a fourth Barclays ATP World Tour Finals crown, at The O2 in London from 9-16 November.

In lifting his seventh Grand Slam championship trophy with victory over Roger Federer at the All England Club, Djokovic overtakes Rafael Nadal at No. 1 and begins his 102nd week at the top of men’s professional tennis – the eighth-longest overall reign.

On reclaiming the No. 1 spot and qualifying for the Barclays ATP World Tour Finals, Djokovic said, “It feels great not only to win Wimbledon again but also to return to No. 1 in the [Emirates] ATP Rankings. I got to No. 1 for the first time in my career after winning Wimbledon in 2011 so it is nice to do it again here. I can’t wait to return to London to defend the [Barclays] ATP [World Tour] Finals title. I have had a good run there in the past two years. I really enjoy playing at The O2.”

Watch: Djokovic Reclaims No. 1 ; Djokovic Qualifies For London

The 27-year-old Djokovic, who will be making his eighth straight appearance at the Barclays ATP World Tour Finals, has become the first singles player to qualify for the prestigious season finale. He first won the title in 2008 (d. Davydenko), when the tournament was held in Shanghai, and claimed back-to-back crowns at The O2 in 2012 (d. Federer) and 2013 (d. Nadal).

ATP Executive Chairman and President, Chris Kermode, said, “We are delighted that Novak has become the first player to book his place at this year’s Barclays ATP World Tour Finals at The O2 in London. He is having an outstanding season and is fully deserving of his place as current World No.1. Fans in the UK and around the world will already be looking forward to welcoming back this year’s Wimbledon champion to London in November, where he’ll be looking to win a third successive season-ending title.”

After finishing his 2013 ATP World Tour campaign with four straight titles, Djokovic extended his winning streak to 28 straight matches before a loss to Stan Wawrinka in the Australian Open quarter-finals. He won three ATP World Tour Masters 1000 titles – at the BNP Paribas Open in Indian Wells, the Sony Open Tennis in Miami and Internazionali BNL d’Italia in Rome – and came up just short in his bid for a career Grand Slam, when he finished runner-up to Nadal at Roland Garros in a match with the No. 1 mantle on the line.

Djokovic first ascended to No. 1 in the Emirates ATP Rankings on 4 July 2011, following his maiden Wimbledon triumph, and held the top spot for 53 weeks. He reclaimed the No. 1 ranking from Federer on 5 November 2012, before relinquishing it to Nadal on 7 October 2013. Djokovic was the year-end ATP World Tour No. 1 in 2011 and 2012.

The Barclays ATP World Tour Finals has welcomed more than 1.25 million fans to The O2 arena over the past five years, establishing itself as the biggest indoor tennis tournament in the world since moving to London in 2009. Tickets can be purchased at: www.BarclaysATPWorldTourFinals.com.

Emirates ATP Race To London – Top 15 (as of Monday, 7 July, 2014)

 

Singles
Pos. Name YTD Points
1. N. Djokovic (SRB) 7,250
2. R. Nadal (ESP) 6,645
3. R. Federer (SUI) 4,560
4. S. Wawrinka (SUI) 4,095
5. T. Berdych (CZE) 3,050
6. G. Dimitrov (BUL) 2,785
7. A. Murray (GBR) 2,435
8. K. Nishikori (JPN) 2,405
9. D. Ferrer (ESP) 2,385
10. E. Gulbis (LAT) 2,265
11. M. Raonic (CAN) 2,205
12. M. Cilic (CRO) 1,710
13. F. Fognini (ITA) 1,500
14. A. Dolgopolov (UKR) 1,410
15. J. Tsonga (FRA) 1,365


Bold denotes qualification

 

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Novak Djokovic Wins Second Wimbledon Crown with Five-set Victory over Roger Federer

 

 

(July 6, 2014) WIMBLEDON – No. 1 seed Novak Djokovic who failed to close out the match in the fourth set was extended to five by 7-time champion Roger Federer, but the Serb held on for his second Wimbledon title a 6-7 (7), 6-4, 7-6 (4), 5-7, 6-4 at Centre Court at the All England Club on Sunday.

It was a match of momentum shifts, the first set going to the almost 33-year-old veteran grabbing the opening set in a tiebreak. Djokovic grabbed the momentum back with an early break in the second and added to it with a a solid tiebreak in the third. Djokovic ran up a 5-2 lead, serving for match at 5-3, holding a championship point. The world No. 4 surged to take the last 5 games of the set to claim it 7-5.

This set up a fifth set which saw both men hold steady until the 10th game when Federer failed to be consistent with his first serve and his groundstrokes. Four unforced errors for Federer, and Djokovic took advantage for break of serve for game, set and match.

“I was very close in several occasions, even in the fourth, to win the match,” Djokvic said.  “But, you know, I could have easily lost my concentration in the fifth and just handed him the win.

“But I didn’t, and that’s why this win has a special importance to me mentally.  Because I managed to not just win against my opponent but win against myself as well and find that inner strength that got me the trophy today.”

“I was just overwhelmed with the emotions, positive emotions, that I was experiencing in the match,” Djokvic stated.  “I was not surprised, I was just trying to enjoy the moment, rethink what I’ve been through during the match.”

“Sincerely, this has been the best quality Grand Slam final that I ever been part of.  I’ve had a longest final against Nadal in the Australian Open 2012.

“But quality-wise from the first to last point, this is definitely the best match.

“Roger played very well, I thought, in a very high level.  He showed why he’s a champion.  He showed a fighting spirit, composure in important moments when he was a break down.”

During the trophy ceremony Djokovic said to Federer: “I respect your career and everything you have done. And thank you for letting me win today.” Even Federer had to smile at his conqueror’s statement.

Not only does the win give Djokvic a seventh major title, it will moe his ranking back up to No. 1 ahead of Rafael Nadal.

“But it was close,” said Federer, who was bidding for a record eighth Wimbledon title.  “Novak deserved it at the end clearly, but it was extremely close.”

“It’s just nice being in Wimbledon finals, number one,” the Swiss continued.  “Winning or losing, it’s always something special and something you’ll remember, even more so when the match was as dramatic as it was today.

“It’s even more memorable when I see my kids there with my wife and everything.  That’s what touched me the most, to be quite honest.  The disappointment of the match itself went pretty quickly.”

With Djokovic’s win, he has snapped his losing streak in major finals,” Before Sunday he had lost the last three, and five out of the last six.

Djokovic said: “Most special Grand Slam final I’ve played.  At the time of my career for this Grand Slam trophy to arrive is crucial, especially, as I said, after losing several Grand Slam finals in a row.  Started doubting of course a little bit.  I needed this win a lot.

“I’m going to try to use it in the best possible way and for my confidence to grow for the rest of my season and the rest of my career.”

Asked by a reporter if this could be his last Wimbledon, Federer replied: “There is no guarantee that you’re going to be ever there again or not.  Or maybe there’s much more to come.  It’s really impossible to answer that question.

“I’m very happy to see that with feeling normal I can produce a performance like I did the last two weeks.  That clearly makes me believe that this was just a steppingstone to many more great things in the future.”

Djokovic dedicated his triumph to his pregnant fiancee Jelena Ristic, his future baby and his first coach Jelena Gencic who died last year.

Djokovic now joins John McEnroe and Mats Wilander in a tie for eighth place on the list for most major singles titles in the Open Era.

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Novak Djokovic and Roger Federer Advance to Wimbledon Final

 

(July 4, 2014) Top seed Novak Djokovic will face No. 4 Roger Federer for the Wimbledon final on Sunday after semifinal victories on Centre Court on Friday.

Novak Djokovic overcame a second set charge by Grigor Dimitrov to move into his third Wimbledon final in four years, 6-4, 3-6, 7-6 (2), 7-6 (7). For the 11th seed Dimitrov, who reached in his first major semifinal, had a 10-match winning streak snapped by the Serb.

Djokovic broke serve to go up 3-1 and held on to take the set 6-4. Dimitrov, after going down a break in the second set 1-3, with his girlfriend Maria Sharapova in attendance, the Bulgarian reeled off five straight games to even the match at a set apiece.

Djokovic came back with a more aggressive game, while the 23-year-old Dimitrov had serving woes, including a string of three double faults in the third game of the fourth set.

Roger Federer took on the big-serving 23-year-old Milos Raonic in the second of the men’s semis. Federer opened the match by breaking the Canadian’s serve and held on to take the set 6-4, Federer broke in the 9th game of the second set and held for 6-4, a feat he repeated in the third set to complete the win.

“He just played well,” said the Canadian.  “I didn’t put in the serves I needed to.  Normally I start off serving much better, and then he came up with the right shots.

“Pretty much every single time he was leaning the right way.  He was hitting good, deep returns that didn’t allow me to sort of get into it.

“I’m quite disappointed with the level I was able to put out, Raonic added.  “I know I can do much better.

“Obviously I wasn’t expecting by any means to play my best, but I was expecting much better from myself.”

“Well, it’s big in the moment itself because you just don’t know how many chances you’re going to get,” Federer talking about the first break of serve against Raonic.  “I think he was in the lead maybe, 15‑Love, 30‑15.  I didn’t see it coming necessarily, but I grabbed it and then ran with it.

“Because clearly I’m also looking for rhythm on my own serve, so holding for the next couple service games was important for me to stay ahead and somehow get the first set under the belt, which I did, because I don’t think we both necessarily played great in that first set.

“So it was good for me to get it that way.  I just felt like I created some good opportunities when I was in his service games.  Yeah, clearly looking back it’s always going to be big, any break you do, you make against Milos.”

The 27-year-old Djokovic will be going for his seventh Grand Slam title, while Federer will be looking for his 18th, a record 8th Wimbledon crown. Djokovic last played Federer in a major final back in the 2007 U.S. Open final where the Swiss defeated Djokovic in straight sets. Djokovic has lost in his last two major finals, falling to Rafael Nadal at the French Open last month and at the 2013 U.S. Open.

“I came out on the court to win, said Dimitrov.  “Okay, I think I had a pretty slow start, but at some point I think I got my act together and I was really playing a good tennis.”

Dimitrov had a 6-3 lead in the fourth set tiebreak and had he won it, the match would have been extended to a fifth set.

“You never know what would have happened if I had taken that fourth set.  I think at the same time I had my momentum.  It’s just he came on top today, so all the credit to him.”

It may have been a disappointing loss for the Bulgarian, but it’s been a good fortnight for him.

“I think this is the first time for me to be in semifinal of a slam, so obviously to me that’s just positive,” Dimitrov said.  “I’m not going to overanalyze much what’s been happening the past weeks to me because there’s no need for that.

“I think I’m in a good spot at the moment.  I’m practicing well.  I’m doing a good work on and off the court.  I’m focusing really on every match that I’m playing, regardless.  Doesn’t matter what kind of tournament I’m playing.

“It’s a good learning curve for me to put myself in such a position and play against those kind of players and attack the top in a different way.

“Of course, I’m going to have to play even better when it comes to matches like that, but it’s a good lesson for me.  I can take a lot of positives out of all the matches I played out here in England.  It’s been, you know, solid weeks for me.”

Djokovic, who will be playing Federer for the 35th time on Sunday talked about the keys to the match:

“We know each other’s games.  We played many matches on different occasions.  As you said, only once on grass court, but we played so many times in semifinals and finals of Grand Slams, different surfaces, big matches over the years.  They were very exciting.

“And, of course, most of the matches we play against each other went the distance.  So I’m going to be, of course, physically ready and fit to go the distance this time.  Of course, there is plenty of motivation from my side to win this Grand Slam final after losing last three out of four.

Of course, I want to try to, you know, get the title.  It would mean a lot mentally for me.  The key against him in the game, of course, is trying to not allow him to dictate too much because he likes to be very aggressive, he likes to come to the net.

“I’m going to have to be able to get as many returns back in the court and try to also stay closer to the line, protect the baseline.”

 

“We both like to be close to the baseline.  We both like to take charge, especially on quicker courts.  He has a wonderful way of either redirecting or taking the ball early, you know, taking pace from the opponent, even generating some of his own.

“So I think that’s what makes him so hard to play.  There’s not really a safe place you can, you know, play into.  Like back in the day there was many guys where you just knew, Oh, this guy is a bit dodgey on the backhand.  Let me play that and then build up the point from that.

“Novak can hurt you down the line or cross‑court on both sides.  He’s really improved now through the years.  I’ve seen him come through the ranking.  His forehand, his serve, his movement clearly is what stands out the most at this moment now.  He’s really been able to improve that and make it rock solid.

“I think for me it’s really important to stay aggressive against him.  And especially here at Wimbledon it’s more simple how we need to play against each other.  It’s not like on a slow court where you can maybe maneuver the other guy around so much.

“I think on grass it’s a bit more straightforward and I think we’re both aware of that.”

Federer leads Djokovic in head-to-head matches 18-16.

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Semifinals Set for Both Men and Women at Wimbledon

 

 

(July 2, 2014) WIMBLEDON – Grigor Dimitrov ended the run of defending champion Andy Murray 6-1, 7-6(4), 6-2 to reach the semifinals of Wimbledon, becoming the first Bulgarian man to do so. Dimitrov joins No. 1 seed Novak Djokovic, seven-time Wimbledon champion Roger Federer and another newcomer Milos Raonic in the semifinals.

The No. 11 seed ended Murray’s 16-match winning streak at the All England club which went all the way back to the 2012 Olympic Games.

“I have very good memories from that court out there,” Murray said.  It’s a special court for me.

“Yeah, I mean, you can have bad days as an athlete.  You don’t win all of the time.  Sometimes you just have to take it on the chin and move on.

“But, yeah, when you don’t feel like you played as well as you can, that’s disappointing and frustrating.  Yeah, that’s happened a few times in the slams over the last year, so I’m disappointed about that.”

“I think I got early on in the match on top of him, and I think that really helped me, you know, progress in that way.” Dimitrov said.  “I think second and third set was just a little different.

“But, I mean, I can’t say much about the match because I came out to win the match.  I was really positive.  I was ready.  I had a lot of patience no matter how many sets I was supposed to play.

“But I was just composed and I was looking for every point that I had to play.”

On Friday, Dimitrov face 2011 Wimbledon champion in Novak Djokovic who reached the semifinals for a fifth straight year. Top seed Djokovic had to rally to top No. 26 Marin Cilic of Croatia 6-1, 3-6, 6-7 (4), 6-2, 6-2.

On the lower half of the draw, Federer will play No. 8 Milos Raonic, the first Canadian man in a Grand Slam semifinal since the early 1920s.

Federer dropped his first set of the fortnight to Australian Open champion Stan Wawrinka en route to a 3-6, 7-6 (5), 6-4, 6-4 win over his Swiss countryman.

“There was a lot on the line today playing against Stan,” Federer said.  “Quarters sort of shows the direction on how you’re playing and all these things.

“I’m really pleased to have come through.  Like you said, last year was a major disappointment for me because I always see Wimbledon as one of my main goals of the season, side-by-side with rankings and some other highlights that I choose that there are for me.

“I try to be in the best possible shape, so last year was rough.  I was very disappointed.  Went back to the practice courts.  Didn’t have any options left at that point.

“So I’m happy that one year later I’m back in the semis and with a chance to go further.”

In the battle between big servers, Raonic defeated teenager Nick Kyrgios, who beat Rafael Nadal in the fourth round 6-7 (4), 6-2, 6-4, 7-6 (4). Raonic hit 39 aces.

In the women’s quarterfinals, No. 3 Simona Halep beat 2013 Wimbledo runner-up Sabine Lisicki 6-4, 6-0, and will take on No. 13 Eugenie Bouchard, who beat No. 9 Angelique Kerber 6-3, 6-4.

“It was a great match for me today,” said Halep.  “I played really well and I’m really excited that I can play semifinals tomorrow.

“I like this tournament and I feel really well here.  I’m looking forward for the next round just to play good tennis and to try my best on court.”

Bouchard has reached her third straight major semifinal.

“I’m excited to be in the semis,” said the 20-year-old.  “But, of course, you know, never satisfied, so definitely want to go a step further, or as far as I can.

“I think, you know, I played some great players when I lost in the semis.  You know, you don’t win every single time.  But, you know, I’m going to look forward to try to play a little bit like I played today.  I thought I was pretty solid out there and playing the right way on the grass.

“So that’s going to be a key.”

Thursday’s other Ladies’ semifinal will be a battle between two left-handed Czech women -2011 champion Petra Kvitova versus No. 23 Lucie Safarova.

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Andy Murray and Novak Djokovic Move into Wimbledon Quarterfinals

 

 

(June 30, 2014) WIMBLEDON -Top seed Novak Djokovic and third seed Andy Murray are getting closer to a semifinal clash as both men reached the Wimbledon quarterfinals on Monday at the All England Club.

Defending champion Murray reached his seventh straight Wimbledon quarterfinal after beating Kevin Anderson of South Africa 6-4, 6-3, 7-6 (6) under a closed roof on Centre Court, after a rain delay in the second set forced the roof to be shut.

For the Scot Murray it’s his 17 straight match win at the All England club dating back to the 2012 Olympic Games in London.

The Serb Djokovic beat France’s Jo-Wilfried Tsonga for the 11th consecutive time with a 6-3, 6-4, 7-6 (5) win.

“I was just happy that I won the match,” Murray said.  “I was a bit disappointed with how I started under the roof.  The beginning, like I said, I was a little bit tentative.  Apart from that, that sort of three or four games when we came back out, I played well.

“I created many chances, gave him a few opportunities.  That’s what you need to do on grass court tennis.  You don’t always break.  But if you keep putting them under enough pressure, you’re going to get through in the end.”

“I knew I was going to get tested, you know, at some stage,” the Scot added.  “And, yeah, today I was pushed, especially in the middle part of that second set, then obviously later on in the third there were some tight moments.

“But I handled them fairly well.  It was a good match.”

“I think he was moving great,” Anderson said of Murray’s play.  “That’s a big part of his game.  I think especially on the grass I think that’s a big contributor to why he’s had so much success on this surface.”

Murray will face No. 11. Grigor Dimitrov in his quarterfinal. Dimitrov defeated Leonardo Mayer 6-4, 7-6 (6), 6-2.

“It’s a step up because it’s one round further, and the guys that are in the quarterfinals are going to be playing top tennis,” Murray said about his encounter with the Bulgarian.  “He obviously won Queen’s a couple weeks ago.  He likes the grass courts.

“Yeah, it’s a big opportunity for him, as well, playing on the Centre Court, the courts at Wimbledon for the first time.

“Yeah, it’s a great opportunity for him.  Hopefully we can play a good match.”

 

“I’m happy that I’m in the quarterfinal match,” Dimitrov said.  “Just going to give credit to myself for that.  But my job isn’t over yet.

“So I’m excited to get on the court tomorrow.  Just go through my regular routines, through all the gears, you know, come on Wednesday.”

 

“I’m just going to play my game,” Dimitrov added.  “I’m not going to step back.  I just want to come out with my big game and play my aggressive tennis.”

 

“I was aware of his qualities, especially on this surface,” Djokvic said of his match with Tsonga.  “He looked, before the match, very determined to play his best and very focused.

“I think I did really well from the start to the end, especially in the third set where I thought he elevated his level of game and he started serving very high percentage first serve, very strong, all angles.

“It was difficult to get the return back in play, but managed to save a couple break points, crucial ones, get myself in the tiebreak and wait for the opportunity to be presented.

“We both served very well in the tiebreak, and the only opportunity I had was on second serve on 6-5, and I used it.  I went for the shot.

“Yeah, I’m just glad that I didn’t allow him to go into the fourth set, because he started to use obviously the crowd support.  And, you know, I knew that he’s going to do that because he’s the kind of player that feeds off the energy, so it was very important for me to get this done in straight sets.”

Djokovic will play Marin Cilic for a place in the semifinals.

“I will try to stick to the kind of a game plan that I had against Marin in the previous occasions,” Djokovic said.

“I am aware of the fact, as well, that since he started working with Goran Ivanesevic that he has improved, especially in his service department, where for his height I thought that he didn’t use his full potential up to now work with Goran, where it’s evident that it works well for him.

“Especially on the grass it serves as a great weapon.  He won here in straight sets against Chardy and Berdych and some very good players.

“So it says enough about his quality play in this tournament.”

Stan Wawrinka was finally able to complete his third round match on Monday. Rain on Saturday delayed his chance to play.

The No. 1 Swiss will face 19th seed Feliciano Lopez in the fourth round. Lopez dismissed the last American man in the singles draw, Ninth seed John Isner, 6-7 (8), 7-6 (6), 7-6 (3), 7-5, despite the American hitting 52 aces.

“Tough match to play,” Lopez said.

“As I said before, I knew it’s going to be like this.  I knew we going to play a lot of tiebreaks, so this is the match I was excepting to play.

“Luckily I made it.  I’m very happy to went through.  It was a very difficult one for me today.”

With Isner beaten and Madison Keys withdrawing from the tournament with an injury, it’s the first time since 1911 that no Americans have reached the round of 16 at Wimbledon.

Asked about this fact, Isner said, “Didn’t know that. Don’t really care either.”

Keys was forced to pull out of the tournament with a left adductor injury.

On the women’s side of the draw, the conqueror of Serena Williams has been knocked out of Wimbledon.

Canada’s Eugenie Bouchard, the 13th seed defeated Alize Cornet 7-6 (5), 7-5 to reach the quarterfinals.

“I think we played some good tennis today, “Bouchard said.  “You know, we had some tough points.  She has good wheels.  So I had to really try and finish off the point.

“You know, I think it made for some really tough, physical points.  So that’s definitely the most physical match I’ve played I think this tournament.

“But I’m proud that I really, really fought till the end.  She’s a good fighter, too.  We were really just battling.”

“This is what I’ve worked so hard for, to be in the quarters at Wimbledon,” Bouchard said. “But I want to go another step. I want to keep going.”

Bouchard will play the winner of the fourth round match between Maria Sharapova and Angelique Kerber.

Bouchard spoke briefly about playing both of these women:

“I think she’s a great player,” Bouchard said of Sharapova.  “She, you know, tries to be aggressive like I try to be aggressive as well.  So I think, you know, I’m going to go in and try to battle and go for my shots.  We had a tough match recently at the French Open.  But that’s the past.  So it’s a new match.  If I were to play her, I would just be very excited and really try to go for it.”

“Kerber I played at the French as well.  I played both opponents recently.  Of course with her she’s a lefty so you keep that in mind with tactics.  I played well last time against her because I was really trying to go for it.  Whenever I had an opening, I would really go for it.  I would keep my basic game against both players.”

Three players from the Cazech Republic are among the women’s quarterfinalists – 2011 Wimbledon champion Petra Kvitova, Lucie Safarova and unseeded Barbora Zahlavova Strycova.

Zahlavova Strycova, who beat No. 2 Li Na, defeated No. 16 Caroline Wozniacki 6-2, 7-5 to reach her first Grand Slam quarterfinal. Back in April 2013, she completed serving a a six-month doping ban after testing positive for the stimulant sibutramine.

“I can’t believe it for right now,” Zahlavova Strycova sid about the win and reaching the quarterfinals.  “It’s great.  I mean, it was a tough match obviously, and I had to make a fifth match point.

“I’m really, really happy that I could win today.”

She spoke about the six month ban to press: “First of all, I didn’t wanted to play again because I felt like it’s a little bit unfair.  Everything was kind of against.

“So first two months I didn’t want to come back.  Then I missed it.  I missed the feeling of working out, the feeling of winning matches, and being on tour.

“It was tough, but on the other hand, it also brings me some positive things.  Like I say, I am seeing the sport a little bit different now.

“And here I am.”

Last year’s finalist Sabine Lisicki ousted 11th seed Ana Ivanovic 6-4, 3-6, 6-1 to reach the fourth round in a match carried over from Saturday.

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Novak Djokovic Moves into the Fourth Round of Wimbledon

(June 27, 2014) WIMBLEDON – No. 1 seed Novak Djokovic has moved into the fourth round of Wimbledon with a 6-4, 6-2, 6-4 Centre Court win over Frenchman Gilles Simon.

 

The match provided some drama in the sixth game of the third set, the Serb slipped and fell on the grass injuring his left shoulder. After he called a medical time out was called, he was examined and still appeared in pain afterwards. He continued to play on and won the match.

“It was obviously a scary fall,” Djokovic said in a news conference.

“It was obviously a scary fall.  And, you know, I talked with Boris.  We obviously need to work on my diving volleys, learning how to fall down on the court.  I’m not very skillful in that.” He said with a smile.

I tried to land on my left arm.  I basically had a strong impact on the shoulder.  When I stood up, you know, I felt that click or pop, whatever you call it.  I feared, you know, maybe it might be a dislocated shoulder or something like that, or joint problem.

But luckily for me it was only an impact that had a minor effect on the joint and the muscles around, but no damage, significant, that can cause a bigger problem.

I just came from the doctor’s office, ultrasound.  It’s all looking good.

Djokovic will face off against 14th seed Jo-Wilfried Tsonga next.

No. 11 seed Grigor Dimitrov, of Bulgaria won in five sets over Ukraine’s Alexandr Dolgopolov. He’ll play Argentina’s Leonardo Mayer in his debut in the fourth round at Wimbledon.

Djokovic hit seven aces with a total of 31 winners with 23 unforced errors. He was seven for 14 in break point conversions.

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