2014/07/30

ATP Pro Robert Kendrick Named To Sportime, John McEnroe Tennis Academy Staff

NEW YORK, September 10, 2012 – Veteran ATP World Tour professional and NY Sportimes standout Robert Kendrick has been named to the dual posts of Director of Tennis at the Sportime location in Syosset, N.Y., and Co-Director of the John McEnroe Tennis Academy Annex at the Sportime location in Bethpage, N.Y., by Sportime CEO Claude Okin. Kendrick, who has helped the Sportimes advance to the World TeamTennis Eastern Conference finals for the second time in three years, will begin his duties full-time following WTT Finals Weekend presented by GEICO, Sept. 14-16 in Charleston, S.C.

Kendrick, 32, is completing his fifth season since 2002 playing for the NY Sportimes. He was a member of the Sportimes’ WTT championship team in 2005 and was protected by New York in the first round of this year’s draft. Kendrick, also a new father, has been ranked as high as No. 69 on the ATP World Tour. After achieving All American honors at the University of Washington and at Pepperdine, Kendrick’s decade on the ATP Tour was highlighted when he took Rafael Nadal to five sets on center court Wimbledon in 2006. Kendrick contributed 45 men’s doubles and 44 mixed doubles game wins during the 2012 regular season as the Sportimes earned a second-place, 9-5 mark. He will compete as the Sportimes take on Washington in the first round of the Finals next weekend.

“We are fortunate to have someone of Robert Kendrick’s ability, experience and temperament in these important positions at Sportime Syosset and with the John McEnroe Tennis Academy Annex at Sportime Bethpage,” said Sportime Clubs and NY Sportimes CEO Claude Okin. “I have known Robert since he came out of college as a Davis Cup practice player and joined our New York WTT franchise in 2002. He is a world-class tennis player and an even better person. He is going to have a major impact on our aspiring junior players and he is going to bring his normal fun and energy to our adults and recreational players. We couldn’t be more pleased to have him in a key leadership role on Long Island.”

“I am very excited to begin this new phase in my life, working every day with club members and students of all ages in Syosset and with our future college players and pros at JMTA in Bethpage,” said Kendrick. “My wife Tara, my baby girl Kenzie and my son who is scheduled to arrive in a few months, are all excited to be making this move to New York, as begin what I know will be a long career with Sportime. I look forward to the opportunity to share the knowledge I have gained in my almost 30 years playing competitive tennis as a junior, a college player and professional on the ATP Tour. It is so special for me to be able to create this new opportunity with my friends Claude Okin and John McEnroe, and with Sportime”

About Sportime:

Sportime is New York’s leader for tennis and sports clubs and programs. Operating 13 clubs across Long Island, in NYC, in Westchester and in the NY Capital Region, Sportime strives to provide its members with welcoming and comfortable environments and the best instructional programs anywhere. Sportime’s “fitness for real life” philosophy is reflected in clubs that are state-of-the-art, yet affordable, and that offer the best tennis facilities, along with great gyms and every sports or fitness experience imaginable.

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Robert Kendrick Suspension Reduced

From the ITF:

 

The International Tennis Federation announced that the Court of Arbitration for Sport (CAS) has partially upheld the appeal by Robert Kendrick against the decision of the independent tribunal dated 29 July 2011.

The independent tribunal had determined that Mr Kendrick should be suspended from participation for a period of 12 months, commencing from 22 May 2011 and so ending at midnight on 21 May 2012 for the commission of an Anti-Doping Rule Violation under Article C.1 of the Tennis Anti-Doping Programme (presence of a Prohibited Substance in player’s sample).

The CAS panel decided that the independent tribunal’s decision be set aside, and replaced with a period of ineligibility of eight months, with the start back-dated to 22 May 2011, the date on which the positive sample was provided. He thus will be eligible to participate on 22 January 2012.

Mr Kendrick’s results from Roland Garros remain disqualified, including forfeiture of the prize money and ranking points won at that event. Mr Kendrick is permitted to retain the prize money won at the UNICEF Open in s’-Hertogenbosch.

The full decision, with reasons, will follow in due course.

The Tennis Anti-Doping Programme is a comprehensive and internationally recognised drug-testing programme that applies to all players competing at tournaments sanctioned by the ITF, ATP and WTA. Players are tested for substances prohibited by the World Anti-Doping Agency and upon a finding that an Anti-Doping Rule Violation has been committed, sanctions are imposed in accordance with the requirements of the World Anti-Doping Code. More background information on the Programme, sanctions, tennis statistics and related information can be found at www.itftennis.com/antidoping.

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American Kendrick Banned for a Year for Testing Positive for a Stimulant

Robert Kendrick of the U.S. reacts during his loss to Gael Monfils of France during the U.S. Open tennis tournament in New York, August 30, 2010. REUTERS/Jessica Rinaldi (UNITED STATES – Tags: SPORT TENNIS)

 

American tennis player Robert Kendrick currently ranked 105 in the world, will be banned from the game by the International Tennis Federation for 12 months for testing positive for a stimulant called methylhexaneamine. He was found positive while being tested at the French Open.

Kendrick admitted that he took the stimulant through a “jet lag” pill. On top of the year ban, he will give up all of his earnings and ranking points from the French Open until now.

The formal International Tennis Federation Press Release:

ITF Press Release

 

Decision in the Case of Robert Kendrick

 

The International Tennis Federation announced today that Robert Kendrick has been found to have committed a Doping Offence under Article C.1 of the Tennis Anti-Doping Programme (presence of a Prohibited Substance in player’s sample).

Mr Kendrick, a 31-year-old tennis player from the United States, provided a sample on 22 May 2011 at the French Open held in Paris, France. That sample was sent to the WADA-accredited laboratory in Montreal, Canada for analysis, and was found to contain methylhexaneamine, a stimulant.
Methylhexaneamine is a Prohibited Substance under section S6 of the 2010 WADA List of Prohibited Substances and Prohibited Methods, and is therefore also prohibited under the Tennis Anti-Doping Programme. Mr Kendrick was therefore charged with an anti-doping rule violation under Article C.1 of the Programme.

Mr Kendrick asserted that the methylhexaneamine had got into his system through his ingestion of a capsule of Zija XM3, which he took to combat jetlag. He denied any intent to enhance his performance as a result of taking this substance.

The ITF accepted Mr Kendrick’s account of the circumstances surrounding his ingestion of methylhexaneamine, and accepted that he did not intend to enhance his performance. Under the Tennis Anti-Doping Programme, however, it is a player’s strict personal duty to ensure that no Prohibited Substance enters his body, whether as a prescription medication or otherwise, unless he holds a valid therapeutic use exemption (TUE) for such substance. Mr Kendrick did not hold a valid TUE.

A tribunal therefore confirmed Mr Kendrick’s commission of a Doping Offence under Article C.1 of the Tennis Anti-Doping Programme, and determined that he should be suspended from participation for a period of 12 months, commencing as from 22 May 2011 and so ending at midnight on 21 May 2012. The tribunal also determined that Mr Kendrick’s results at the 2011 French Open should be disqualified, with resulting forfeiture of the ranking points and prize money that he won at those events.

The Tennis Anti-Doping Programme is a comprehensive and internationally recognised drug-testing programme that applies to all players competing at tournaments sanctioned by the ITF, ATP World Tour, and Sony Ericsson WTA Tour. Players are tested for substances prohibited by the World Anti-Doping Agency and, upon a finding that a Doping Offence has been committed, sanctions are imposed in accordance with the requirements of the World Anti-Doping Code. More background information on the Programme, sanctions, tennis statistics and related information can be found at www.itftennis.com/antidoping.

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Sony Ericsson Open – The Excitement Starts Here and Now

By Craig Hickman

Tours, draw ceremonies, and qualifying matches filled up most of the day at the 2011 Sony Ericsson Open.

At 10:00 am, I toured the 34-acre site guided by tournament director Adam Barrett and Media and Public Relations Director Sam Henderson. Tracking down minor facilities issues (“Why is the Head Tent Closed?”) while walking a small group of media around the exquisitely designed and built set of facilities, it was clear that the Sony Ericsson Open has its eye on a bigger future. Adding another television court, hardwiring expanded workrooms for faster connectivity, and including a high-end VIP restaurant which will feature four celebrity chefs over the next week, the event will remain the premiere event outside of the Grand Slams.

At approximately 11:45, the women’s draw was unveiled. Samantha Stosur chose the chips with the 32 seeded players whose names were taped on a giant draw board threatening to blow off the easel. “Right now, it’s all just a bunch of names,” she said of her place in the 128-line draw. The No. 4 seed and Roland Garros finalist will face the winner of Zheng Jie and Xperia Hot Shot Sorana Cirstea in the second round.

 

The men’s draw followed with Jurgen Melzer doing the choosing. “The first thing I look at is where is Juan Martín del Potro in the draw,” said the No. 10 seed. “He’s in Robin Soderling‘s section so that’s going to be a nice little section. I think everybody says you play one match at a time, but we’re human so sometimes we do look ahead. If you’re confident you don’t care who you play, but if you’re not, you want to know what’s coming.” What’s coming for Melzer is his doubles partner Philipp Petzschner of Germany or Florent Serra of France.

Next, I jumped around and the grounds and darted in and out of several qualifying matches.


American wildcard and birthday girl Sloane Stephens had to rally from a set down to advance to the second round of qualifying. She beat the No. 4 seed Evgeniya Rodina of Russia 3-6, 6-4, 6-3. For a place in the main draw she’ll face Aussie Sophie Ferguson who upset No. 13 Alberta Brianti of Italy 6-4, 3-6, 6-2.


The No. 4 seed in the men’s qualifying draw fared no better. Milwaukee native Tim Smyczek picked about Israel’s Dudi Sela 6-1, 6-4. “I didn’t know what I was doing,” he said after the match. Had me fooled. Though only 5′ 9″, the 23-year-old hits a big serve, has no weakness on either wing, and plays the net with aplomb. Perhaps his best asset on the court is his positive attitude. He played every point as though it were the last and never let an error cost more than one point. Smyczek will have a tough match against Olivier Rochus of Belgium who beat Flavio Cipola of Italy 6-3, 6-2.

 

American Ryan Sweeting also advanced in straight sets. Even though he yelled out to his box that his backhand was the worst it’s ever been, you wouldn’t have known it. Not the way he dismantled Juan Sebastian Cabal 7-6(4), 6-2. The Colombian became so frustrated he double faulted twice to lose the match. Sweeting will play Lukas Rosol of the Czech Republic for a spot in the main draw.

Coming off the biggest win of his career with an upset of Andy Murray at the BNP Paribas Open, Donald Young was back to the business of qualifying for another major event. Against the wily veteran in Arnaud Clement, Young was out of sorts out the gate, dropping the first 10 points of the match with a listless performance and cantankerous disposition. But the young American who has seemed burdened by big expectations shook off a lopsided first set and turned the match around. “I didn’t play my game in the first set. I started to keep more balls in play and kept fighting,” said Young. He took pace off his shots, forcing Clement to create his own pace, and that change in tactics forced the Frenchman to make more errors. “If I keep playing my game, the way I played in the last two sets, I can get through.” He’ll have to fight past Frank Dancevic of Canada who can produce good tennis on North American hardcourts.

 

Americans Lauren Davis, Irina Falconi, Jamie Hampton, Christina McHale, Robert Kendrick, Michael Russell also advanced.

Tomorrow, matches from the women’s main draw begin on the Grandstand, Court 1 and Court 2. Find the full schedule here.

Craig Hickman is founder and editor of Craig Hickman’s Tennis Blog. Follow him on twitter @CraigHickman.  Find his Sony Ericsson Open tweets on @GVTennisNews.

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