September 28, 2016

Serena Williams Wins Wimbledon Title, Tying Steffi Graf with 22 Major Titles

(July 9, 2016) Serena Williams defeated Angelique Kerber 7-5, 6-3 to win her seventh Wimbledon title and her 22nd major to equal the Open Era record of Steffi Graf on Saturday. This match was a rematch of the Australian Open final back in January, this time, Williams won the match.

Margaret court, holder of 24 majors is the all-time leader, as most of her titles came before Open Era began in 1968.

With the win the 34-year-old Williams is the oldest woman to win a major.

Williams reached 21 majors at last year’s Wimbledon. She lost in the semis of the U.S. Open, having won the first three majors of 2015. She fell in the finals of of the first two majors of 2016, the Australian Open and Roland Garros.

The world No. 1 dominated the match with her serving, hitting 13 aces, winning 38 out of 43 points on her first serve. She hit a total of 39 winners (including the aces) with 24 unforced errors, winning a total of 72 points. She was 2 for 6 on break point chances. The American broke the German’s serve in the 12th game of the first set and the eighth game of the second set.

“You know I love playing her,” Williams said during the trophy presentation. β€œShe brings out the best tennis out of me. And off the court she is a great person.”

“It’s been incredibly difficult not to think about (winning major No. 22). I’ve had two tries this year and lost to two incredibly difficult opponents, one is Angelique actually.”

β€œIt makes the victory even sweeter to know how hard I had to work for it.”

“It was really super competitive,” Williams said later on ESPN. β€œI think the difference was I knew I needed to hold serve today because I really wasn’t feeling her serve well. The conditions were windy, so I absolutely had to hold serve.”

“This court definitely feels like home. In fact I have a match later in doubles!”

It was a double win for Serena as she and her sister Venus went on to win their 14 major doubles title together as well as their sixth Wimbledon title beating fifth seeds Timea Babos of Hungary and Yaroslava Shvedova of Kazakhstan 6-3, 6-4. the Williams sisters are now a perfect 14-0 in major doubles finals as a duo

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Sorana Cirstea: Focused on Improvement and Full of Belief

Cirstea Press

By Brodie Elgin

(August 8, 2013) TORONTO – When people refer to the “power game” in women’s tennis today, they often base it off of their experience with women’s tennis in the 1990s or the serve and volley days of the 1980s and prior. Not only are the racquet technologies of today different, but players are more fit and strong, and most women play their games from the baseline. It has been a gradual upward correlation between big hitting and big success.

 

While some of the top players in the game, Serena Williams, Victoria Azarenka, and Maria Sharapova hit the ball with incredible pace, ripping the cover off the ball isn’t an exclusively top 5 trait. Sorana Cirstea is known for her big ground strokes. Her blistering forehand is even more impressive courtside, so much so that it often leaves fans unfamiliar with her oohing and aahing at the sight of her first few big shots.

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Back on her beloved hard courts for the first time since Miami, Cirstea made an impressive run to the Stanford semifinals and then lost in her quarterfinal match in Washington before heading to Toronto. Her impressive form from Stanford has continued in Toronto as she won two of the biggest matches of her season, defeating two former world number ones Caroline Wozniacki and Jelena Jankovic in under 24 hours to reach the quarterfinals of the Rogers Cup presented by National Bank.

 

After saving two match points against Wozniacki, Cirstea reeled off 15 straight points, including the second set tiebreak to love. “I kind of started to take charge, you know, and be in control of the points.” She looked primed to control the third set with chances to hold and consolidate a break to take a 1-4 lead. However, she was eventually broken and quickly found herself locked at 3-3. Instead of letting frustrations boil over, she took a walk to the backboard, put her hands on her hips and gave herself a talking to. It worked, and holding twice she eventually broke Wozniacki to love as the Dane served at 4-5, and Cirstea took the match 5-7, 7-6(0), 6-4. “I’m proud of the fact that from the first moment until the last moment that I had the belief in me. Β I feel I earned that victory.Β  I fought very hard for it.”

Sorana Cirstea

Eventually getting back to the hotel early Thursday morning at 1:30am, Cirstea was faced with the difficult task of taking on Jelena Jankovic, a short 16 hours later. She frustrated Jankovic by going for big winners when the time arrived, and the Serbian failed to effectively counterpunch Cirstea’s overwhelming power. Jankovic became particularly frustrated in the second set, and Cirstea moved on into the quarterfinals, winning 6-3, 6-4. “I think I made a huge step forward today by backing up the win from yesterday, because I think this was one of the issues in the past.Β  I would have a good win but then couldn’t really back it up.”

After Wimbledon, Cirstea spent two weeks in Las Vegas with the Adidas Player Development Program including Steffi Graf and her husband Andre Agassi, as well as his long time fitness coach Gil Reyes. The fitness training appears to have helped.” I actually woke up, and I was very surprised nothing was hurting, nothing was sore,” Cirstea said about the morning after her Wednesday night marathon match, “so I was like, “oh, this is a new feeling.” The fact that after playing three hours yesterday, today I was actually fine, and I knew Jelena is a tough player and she’s going to make me run a lot.Β  I was like, Okay, I have no problem.Β  That’s why I’m here, no?”

 

Sorana Cirstea and Ana Ivanovic at 2012 BNP Paribas Open Players Party

Sorana Cirstea and Ana Ivanovic at 2012 BNP Paribas Open Players Party

The opportunity to hit with Steffi Graf was not just a fun opportunity, but somewhat of a daunting one as well. “I started tennis because of Steffi Graf, so of course the first time I met her I couldn’t even talk that’s how nervous I was. Even now, every time she comes I’m so nervous,” Sorana laughed. “Every time Steffi comes in, the rhythm that she plays [with], so 45 minutes with her feels like an hour and a half. She’s so professional, still so fit, even now. She’s my idol, and my biggest example. I think I’m quite lucky to interact with them and learn.”

 

While hitting big has never been a problem for the Romanian, Cirstea is hoping to take her game to the next level through improved fitness and mental maturity on court. This is already the ninth time she has won this year after dropping the first set. “Everyone knows that I start a little bit slow. This year I’ve been trying to change a little bit of things, and for me to actually start better from the beginning, and try to get ahead. But right now, I never lose my belief. If you’re better than me, you have to beat me.” The Romanian has looked particularly composed on court this week, with few outbursts towards her coaches, and often catching herself to walk to the back board and tap her racquet on it as a mental reminder to stay focused.

 

While big hitting players can often gain a lot of hype as potential top 10 players, Cirstea insisted she’s more focused on improving the parts of her game that she wants to work on than focusing on a specific ranking number goal. “I’m enjoying more, and I’m learning more things about myself.Β  I think I grew up and matured along the way.Β  I have been through great times, tough times, and I’m happy that I had all those, because they helped me be stronger and just be a better person and also athlete.”

Brodie Elgin is the writer of mindtheracket.com. You can also follow him on Twitter at @MindTheRacket. He is covering the Rogers Cup in Toronto for Tennis Panorama News, follow @TennisNewsTPN for updates.

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