July 30, 2015

Mauresmo, Hall, and Jeffett Headline the 2015 Tennis Hall of Fame

Hall of Famers gathered in Newport to welcome the International Tennis Hall of Fame Class of 2015. Left to right: Stan Smith, Owen Davidson, Jane Brown Grimes, Rosie Casals, ITHF Chairman Christopher Clouser, Peachy Kellmeyer, Pam Shriver, Gigi Fernandez, Vic Seixas, Brad Parks, David Hall, Nancy Jeffett.    Photo by Kate Whitney Lucey

Hall of Famers gathered in Newport to welcome the International Tennis Hall of Fame Class of 2015. Left to right: Stan Smith, Owen Davidson, Jane Brown Grimes, Rosie Casals, ITHF Chairman Christopher Clouser, Peachy Kellmeyer, Pam Shriver, Gigi Fernandez, Vic Seixas, Brad Parks, David Hall, Nancy Jeffett. Photo by Kate Whitney Lucey

 

By Jack Cunniff

(July 18, 2015) NEWPORT, Rhode Island – The International Tennis Hall of Fame inducted three new members on Saturday afternoon, Amelie Mauresmo and David Hall in the Recent Player category and Nancy Jeffett in the Contributor category.

 

Mauresmo, who could not attend the ceremony due to the impending birth of her first child, was the first Frenchwoman to ever achieve the No. 1 ranking and won two major events in her career, the 2006 Australian Open and 2006 Wimbledon Championships. Her first significant achievement as a professional was in January 1999, reaching her first major final at the Australian Open. The tennis world took notice of her game, a mix of power and grace, and over the next several years Mauresmo added an effective volley and net game to her repertoire. These added dimensions culminated in her most successful year, when she captured two of the four major events in 2006.

 

In total, Mauresmo won 25 WTA Singles titles, including the year-end WTA Tour Championships in 2005. She also represented France in the 2000 and 2004 Olympics, winning a silver medal in Athens 2004, and was a seven-time member of the French Fed Cup team, including the 2003 squad that won the championship.

 

Mauresmo retired from professional tennis following the 2009 U.S. Open, but has not disappeared from the tennis scene. Today she is the coach of Andy Murray, the No. 3 ranked player, a rare women’s coach on the ATP Tour. She also successfully coached her countrywoman Marion Bartoli to the 2013 Wimbledon title, and since 2012 has been the coach of the French Federation Cup Team.

 

David Hall of Australia is a former No. 1 ranked wheelchair tennis player. When he was 16, David was involved in a car accident that resulted in the amputation of both legs. Very soon after, he was inspired when he saw a photograph of a wheelchair tennis player. He used tennis as an outlet, and turned a negative into a positive. His incredibly successful wheelchair tennis career includes six Paralympic medals, including a gold medal in Wheelchair Singles in his hometown of Sydney, and 32 singles championships. Hall was introduced by his former coach, Rich Berman.

 

Nancy Jeffett was introduced by Hall-of-Famer Pam Shriver. In her comments, Shriver highlighted Jeffett’s accomplishments, most notably co-founding the Maureen Connolly Brinker Tennis Foundation with “Little Mo” Connolly. To this day, the MCB Foundation sponsors junior tennis tournaments, and helps develop and support junior players worldwide. Shriver also noted that Jeffett was influential in the decision to host a 1965 Davis Cup tie featuring Arthur Ashe in a Dallas public park, foreshadowing the move of the U.S. Open to a public facility.

 

The Enshrinement Ceremony also featured the Hall of Fame ring presentation to Billie Jean King, a 1987 Tennis Hall of Fame inductee.

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Brits Serve Up a 2-1 Lead Going into Last Day of Davis Cup Quarterfinal

By Ros Satar

(July 18, 2015) LONDON, UK – Great Britain gave themselves the best chance of advancing in the Davis Cup since the 1980’s after they beat the French to set up a 2-1 lead going into the final day.

 

Although Britain had nominated doubles specialists Jamie Murray and Dominic Inglot, there was a widely held consensus that in order for the Brits to give themselves the best possible chance, Andy Murray had to play.

 

Yet he himself had said that he would have to be very honest with the team about how he felt after a long European swing, which saw him win his first titles on clay, Queen’s and then bowing out at the semi-final stage of Wimbledon.

 

His older brother Jamie had the best success of his career to date, making the Wimbledon men’s doubles final with his Australian partner John Peers. He, along with Inglot had paired up in Glasgow earlier in the year, but lost to the Bryan Brothers in a close affair against the United States.

 

Right down to the wire, the decision was made that the Murray brothers would face Jo-Wilfried Tsonga and Nicolas Mahut in Saturday’s pivotal rubber, and early on it looked as though this might not be the wisest choice, as Andy Murray was broken in the opening game of the match, the French not relinquishing the advantage.

 

The second set was a much tighter affair between the sides, with the Brits finally earning their first break point to hit the front for the first time in the match, and with a far more boisterous crowd than yesterday, the atmosphere was electric as Britain leveled.

 

There was drama to come through, as the court has had very little time to recover to be ready for the tie, and over the course of the two days the players have been taking tumbles. The younger Murray had already tweaked his groin in his first match, and an awkward slip rendered him face down in the grass, not to mention some embarrassingly painful looking manipulation afterward.

 

Yet as the pair battled through a tense tie-break to secure a 2-1 lead, Murray minor was leaping around pumped and getting the crowd behind him. It must have worked as the brothers quickly notched up a 5-0 lead, with the French registering a game on the board, and even pushing Jamie’s serve to a break point, before the doubles specialist stole the day with the final winner on match point – final score 4-6, 6-3, 7-6 (5), 6-1

 

It was a subdued Arnaud Clement who met with the press to defend his choices, and of course he can field Richard Gasquet in place of Gilles Simon tomorrow for the fourth rubber, leaving Tsonga to face James Ward if it comes to a fifth rubber.

 

Definitely not subdued was Jamie Murray whose confidence after his Wimbledon run spilled over as he made the most of being chief speaker after today’s result.

 

He said: “I think the crowd were great from first to the last point. Obviously that tie-break proved critical. I don’t really even remember much about it to be honest other than Andy getting that serve back and Mahut diving, and turning round and seeing Andy six feet off the ground. But you know, that’s the thing [about] home support – it’s brilliant to have it and I think as long as we’re playing home ties, everyone that’s coming to watch us should be there and cheering as loud as they can and trying to help the players, because it does really help us to perform as best we possibly can.”

 

Andy now has to try and get himself in gear for the earlier start on Sunday, especially with mixed reports about weather closing in, although no one wants this to push through into next week.

 

He said: “Got to make sure tonight conserve as much energy as possible, go back, recover properly. Get a good night’s sleep and hopefully come out tomorrow and feel good when I get up. Obviously right now after that match, it’s hard not to feel good.

 

“But I’ve also played matches where you do have a massive high, a massive adrenalin rush during the match and in the evening you can feel quite fatigued as well. I’ve been through that before. Just deal with whatever cards I’m dealt tomorrow when I wake up and hopefully play a good match.”

 

The final day starts with Murray facing either Richard Gasquet or Gilles Simon in the fourth rubber, and if it comes down to a fifth and decisive rubber, James Ward will face Tsonga.

 

Ros Satar is a British sports journalist covering tennis, and can also be found at Britwatch Sports.

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Andy Murray Levels Great Britain versus France Davis Cup Tie at 1-1

Tsonga Murray 8814

By Ros Satar

(July 17, 2015) LONDON, UK – It was always going to be a tough ask for James Ward to tackle France’s highest ranked singles player (mind you, they are all stacked one after the other in the rankings).

 

With the fans kitted out in red and blue T-shirts, it was les Bleus who took first blood, as Gilles Simon edged past Ward in the first two sets with a single break, just having to up the level of intensity a little.

 

The third set was a runaway though by French standards as Simon closed out the first rubber comfortably under two hours, 6-4, 6-4, 6-1.

 

The Frenchman is no stranger to these courts this year, having reached the semi-finals here earlier this year, before going on to the quarter-finals at Wimbledon.

 

Ward had no option really but to praise his some-time hitting partner as ‘crafty’. He said: “He hits the ball very flat and moves very well, so even if guys are serving well, he returns well, he makes a lot of balls. And he’s pretty crafty, he puts the ball in places that are not always easy to attack from.”

 

The disappointment was evident in his body-language as he admitted that he and tea, captain Leon Smith had agreed upon tactics for the game, that just hadn’t worked out well today.

 

Ward said: “The guy moves very well, and even when I feel like I’m being aggressive, you can’t go too much because he gets a lot of balls back. And as I say it was very windy, it was moving around a lot there, so to time the ball perfect is very difficult. Sometimes you’re more worried about getting the ball in than trying to go for a winner and close to the line because the margins are small.”

 

So it was left to Andy Murray to level the tie, with a competitive first set just edged as Jo-Wilfred Tsonga went off the boil, spraying some wild forehands generously around the court.

 

There was a hope for the French though, as Tsonga broke at the start of the second set, and as the pair battled into a second set tie-break it looked again as though the French had the upper hand.

 

A strong fight-back from Murray saw them swap set points between them until finally an unforced error from Tsonga put the Brits in a commanding 2 set to love lead. From there it seemed to get away from Tsonga very quickly, with a nervy serve out by Murray at the end to level the tie.

 

He said: “I thought I did well. I mean the atmosphere helps. The crowd was great today, especially the important moments and yeah I was happy with the job I did today. I didn’t feel like I played amazing. I played some good shots at important times but it was very tough conditions today. It was extremely windy on the court today and swirling around a lot so it wasn’t easy to play very well.”

 

It remains to be seen what possible permutations come out for either teams for what is sure to be the pivotal doubles rubber on Saturday.

Ros Satar is a British sports journalist covering tennis, and can also be found at Britwatch Sports.

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French Pull Surprise at Davis Cup Draw Versus Great Britain

 

Tsonga Murray 8814

By Ros Satar

LONDON, UK – The BNP Paribas offices in Central London played host to the draw ceremony for the Davis Cup quarter-final tie between Great Britain and France

 

France perhaps pulled off the biggest surprise of all by announcing that the French No. 1 and No. 2 would be Gilles Simon and Jo-Wilfried Tsonga, leaving Wimbledon semi-finalist Richard Gasquet off the side.

 

The British team were predictably in good spirits, laughing at in-jokes, and explaining away the strength in depth that the French have got, and always acknowledging that at any time, team captain Arnaud Clement could change his mind.

 

James Ward has the task of starting the whole tie off, and with a close history between his coach and Simon’s, the pair probably know their games inside out.

 

“I know him better than the other guys, I practice with him a lot so he knows my game just as well as I know his. I just need to stay aggressive and try and play my game and not worry too much about him, and yeah see how we get on.”

 

Simon agreed when asked in the French team’s press conference, adding: “I know what to expect, it will be hard but I think it will be a good match.”

 

The main focus of course is on Murray, who admitted yesterday that it had taken a few days to get over the Wimbledon semi-final loss to Roger Federer. But within the banter of the team, he was able to put his finger on what to expect when he plays the second rubber on Friday.

 

“He’s an explosive player, he can serve big, he can get to the net quickly, he can be dangerous,” he said. “The things that I’ll look for is to try and play a very consistent match from start to finish. If his level drops at times where he makes a few errors, try to capitalize on that, but he’s a tough tough guy to beat on this surface.”

 

There is always the option of adding Andy to the doubles mix, instead of Dominic Inglot who had to struggle to get fit in time for Wimbledon, and a lot will now depend on how that first rubber kicks off.

 

But one thing was clear – this was a team effort, and not a chance for Andy only to fill any hole in his trophy cabinet.

 

He said: “I wouldn’t say winning this year is the chance of the lifetime because we’re playing against a great team. It’s not like this is an amazing opportunity because the draw has opened up, this is an easy match or we have an easy path through to the final. It is extremely tough tie, beating the States was hard as well, and yeah it’s an opportunity obviously, but opportunity of a lifetime for me personally, no I don’t agree with that at all.”

 

As part of the team effort, the team are altogether in a hotel, fostering the team spirit we have seen when they greet the press for these draw conferences. Equally, the French team are just as motivated after their loss to the Swiss last year in the final.

 

The tie will start on Friday – James Ward v Gilles Simon followed by Andy Murray versus Jo-Wilfried Tsonga. The doubles is expected to be Jamie Murray and Dominic Inglot versus Nicolas Mahut and Richard Gasquet, with the reverse singles on Sunday starting with Murray versus Simon.

 

Ros Satar is a British sports journalist covering tennis, and can also be found at Britwatch Sports.

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Tennis Channel to Air World TeamTennis match Featuring Andy Roddick

Andy Roddick Tennis Panorama

LOS ANGELES, JULY 15, 2015 – Tennis Channel will have live coverage of the Mylan World TeamTennis match, featuring American star Andy Roddick on Thursday, July 16, at 8 p.m. ET.

 

The match between Roddick’s team, the Austin Aces, and the California Dream will take place at the Gregory Gymnasium at the University of Texas in Austin. This July, Tennis Channel will also have live coverage of three more World TeamTennis matchups, including competitions between the Boston Lobsters and Washington Kastles; San Diego Aviators and California Dream; and Boston Lobsters and Philadelphia Freedoms.

 

For additional details about Thursday’s programming and for future World TeamTennis dates, please see below and visit www.tennischannel.com.

 

Schedule:

July 16: Austin Aces vs. California Dream-8 p.m. live  July 21: Boston Lobsters vs. Washington Kastles-7 p.m. live 
July 23: San Diego Aviators vs. California Dream-10:30 p.m. live  July 28: Boston Lobsters vs. Philadelphia Freedoms-7 p.m. live 
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Fighting talk from the French and the British ahead of the Davis Cup Quarterfinal

314Murrayinpress2-001

 

By Ros Satar

LONDON, England – Arnaud Clement fields a team of players who believes can handle any surface thrown at them, as he prepares to face Great Britain at home at Queen’s club for the quarter-final of the Davis Cup.

 

The team comprising of Wimbledon semi-finalist Richard Gasquet, Jo-Wilfried Tsonga, Gilles Simon, Nicholas Mahut and Pierre-Hugues Herbert met with the press ahead of the draw, to talk about their preparations.

 

Last year’s finalists may be more traditionally associated with the clay of Roland Garros, but their players are no slouches on the grass, as team captain

 

Arnaud Clement explained: “You know for our team, to play on grass, hard court, indoor court or clay court it’s almost the same. My players are good on all surface and reach finals and won tournaments on all the surface all over the world so for us, I think they chose grass because it’s the best surface for Great Britain.”

 

He may have some early injury worries, as Gilles Simon was spotted limping off court an hour before the press conference, although he played down questions about his condition joking that he was in great shape and had not wanted to play anymore.

 

Conditions have veered between bouts of rain and sun making the rested courts at Queen’s probably a little slick.

 

Gasquet, who bowed out to eventual champion Novak Djokovic after a five set quarter-final against recently crowned French Open champion Stan Wawrinka gave himself a well-earned rest ahead of the tie.

 

He said: “I stopped three days and started again yesterday. I’m feeling great. I like to play on grass and playing well. And I’m in great shape now and ready for the weekend.”

 

With two of the British team also in the latter stages of the tournament, team Captain Leon Smith was quick to point out that no matter how much match research and planning he or Clement had done, it would all come down to the three days, saying: “The players are so well known. Anyway you can plan as much as you want but it will be much more down to what happens on the day and trying to react. These guys are trying to do the most important part, which is playing. It’s going to be up to us to do the best as possible on the day.”

 

That being said, the nature of Andy Murray’s defeat at the hands of Roger Federer on perhaps a flawless day of serving still was weighing heavy on his mind.

 

He said: “I still thought about it most days, yeah. I did say at the time, the guy served over 80% the first and third set. That’s won’t happen to me for the rest of the year.

 

“You have to look at the match and see what’s happened and analyse it a little bit and look at the tournament as a whole, and Queen’s as well and think about those things and see what I can do better in the future. It doesn’t take one day, there’s a lot of preparation goes into those events and you need to take your time. When you are finished you need to analyse what’s gone right and wrong and things you can do to improve in the future.”

 

There was far less bravado from the British side, but their camaraderie and results over the past few ties have helped make them a formidable unite when combined.

 

Murray continued: “I would say in the last couple of years, everyone’s played their part and all of the matches that have been played, obviously James has won some big singles marches. Even though Jamie and Dom didn’t get the win in Glasgow, they played a great match against the Bryan bros and I think over the last couple of years we’ve had some great performances and I think this is our level now, as a team, and this weekend is going to be a tough ask against four top grass court players. They’re all really really good players, it’s going to be a tough challenge for us but we have an opportunity win it with playing our best level.”

 

The draw will take place on Thursday, with play starting at Queen’s Club London on Friday.

 

Ros Satar is a British sports journalist covering tennis, and can also be found at Britwatch Sports.

 

 

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US Open Prize Money Tops $40 Million Dollars for the First Time

 

From the USTA: US OPEN PRIZE MONEY TOPS $40 MILLION FOR THE FIRST TIME

 

TOTAL COMPENSATION INCREASES BY MORE THAN 10 PERCENT

TO REACH $42.3 MILLION

 

Each Round in the Singles Competition Increased by a Minimum of Ten Percent

Doubles Prize Money Increased by More Than Eight Percent

 

Each Singles Champion to Receive $3.3 Million

 

WHITE PLAINS, N.Y., July 14, 2015 – The USTA today announced that the total purse for the 2015 US Open will increase by $4 million dollars, bringing the total purse for the tournament to a record $42.3 million and a 10.5 percent increase over the 2014 US Open.

 

Both the men’s and women’s singles champions will earn $3.3 million, the largest payout in US Open history. Each round of the singles competition will see double-digit percentage increases over last year’s record payouts, with the minimum increase of 10 percent for the champions and up to a 14.4 percent increase in the round of 32. Both the men’s and women’s doubles champions will earn $570,000, the highest in US Open history, and overall doubles prize money has been increased by 8.4 percent. The US Open Qualifying Tournament will now offer more than $1.7 million in prize money, a 12 percent increase over 2014.

 

In the last three years, US Open main draw prize money has increased by 67 percent.

Round-by-round individual prize money for the US Open is as follows:

 

Singles:                                                                Doubles (each team):

Winner:                  $3,300,000                              Winners:                      $570,000

Runner-Up:              1,600,000                              Runners-Up:                  275,000

Semifinalist:                805,000                              Semifinalist:                    133,150

Quarterfinalist:            410,975                              Quarterfinalist:                 67,675

Round of 16:               213,575                              Round of 16:                   35,025

Round of 32:               120,200                              Round of 32:                   21,700

Round of 64:                 68,600                              Round of 64:                   14,200

Round of 128:               39,500

 

“We continue our commitment to ensure that the US Open offers one of the most lucrative purses in all of sports,” said USTA Chairman of the Board and President Katrina Adams. “As we have stated, total player compensation at the US Open will reach $50 million by 2017.”

 

This year’s US Open is scheduled for August 31 through September 13, with the US Open Qualifying Tournament beginning on August 25.

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Novak Djokovic Tops Roger Federer for Third Wimbledon Title and Ninth Major

(July 12, 2015) Novak Djokovic defended last year’s Wimbledon title with a 7-6(1), 6-7(10), 6-4, 6-3 victory over Roger Federer for his third Wimbledon crown, ninth major title, sixth tournament win of the year and 54th overall career title. He’s the first man since Federer, to defend his Wimbledon title. The Serbian, world No 1 has evened his head-to-head record against the Swiss at 20-20.

The win for the 28-year-old prevented the seven-time champion, 34-year-old Federer from claiming a record eighth crown at the All-England Club.

Djokovic is now tied with his coach Boris Becker with three Wimbledon titles.

It was Djokovic’s 200th Grand Slam match win and he is now in eighth place overall on the all-time Grand Slam winners list with nine majors.

“It’s a great privilege to play against Roger, who is a great champion,” Djokovic said to BBC television after the match. “He has done so much for our sport on and off the court. It’s a great honor to play him again. I was aware coming onto the court, that Roger would play his best when it matters the most. He pushes you to limits.”

“Novak not only played great today, but also this year, last year and the year before that!” Federer said. “Well done, Novak, you deserved it. At the end he was rock solid. I didn’t play bad myself, so I can be very happy. That’s the way it goes. Once more, it has been a privilege to play here.”

Federer went up a break in the first set only to be broken right back. At 5-6 Djokovic saved to set points and went on a run where he won 14 of 15 points. Djokovic dominated the tiebreak 7-1.

In the second set, Djokovic had 7 set points and failed to close it out, with Federer edging out the Serb in the second set tiebreak 12-10.

Djokovic took away Federer’s momentum in the third set breaking the Swiss’ serve in the third game and held on to win the third set 6-4. The set was interrupted for a rain delay at 3-2.

Djokovic broke Federer’s serve in the fifth game of the fourth set and again in the ninth game to close out the set (6-3) and the match.

“It was always going to be tough for both players to start the first set, second set and third set,” Federer said.  “It’s always a mental and physical challenge to keep going, keep going.

“We both I think had chances.  I don’t remember quite how it went.  I think it went back and forth.  I saved a couple of breakpoints early which I think was big for me to stay with him. Then I think I had chances myself maybe. Then he got the break on a forehand I should not miss.

“It was a different atmosphere then.  Also from the crowd.  Everything went into the breaker.  You slowly got to build it up in the beginning of the third.

“But definitely were a few games where it was close for both guys.  Maybe at the end the key of the match, but who knows.

“Yeah, definitely would have been nice to stay with him there at that point or even go a break ahead.”

“Second set tiebreak,” Djokovic said, “it was frustrating obviously not to be able to close it out.  Very, very frustrated on the changeover because I knew that I cannot let this happen against Roger in the finals of Wimbledon because this might be my last chance in the match.

“But, again, managed to regroup, had a little bit more time, especially in the rain delay.  That’s where I got my thoughts together and went back to the basics and played a really, really good match after that.”

Reflecting on his accomplishments, Djokovic said: “I think there is no reason not to be satisfied with what I have achieved.  In contrary, I’m thrilled and very proud with all the success that I had so far in the career, everything I reached.  If you would ask me as a 14‑year‑old back in Serbia trying to find my way, you know, that this is how I’m going to end up at 28, of course I would sign the deal and take it right away.

“There were a couple of Grand Slam finals that I think I could have won. But, again, having said that, everything happens for a reason.  I try to learn from every experience, especially the ones that don’t end up victorious for me.  I’m going to keep going.

“I’m 28.  I feel good. I don’t feel old.  I have hopefully many more years in front of me.  I’m going to try to push my own limits and see how far I can go really with titles and with myself playing on this high level.”

Asked about Djokovic’s position among the tennis greats, Federer said: “Moving up. We don’t know who is what, all these things.  But he’s clearly making a big name for himself, you know, having won as many times now as he has in these different slams.  But also his streak at world No. 3, 2, 1, keeping it up, keeping it going, winning a lot of titles time and time again.

“Staying injury‑free now for him is crucial.  Clearly he’s going to be one of the top guys.  Where, we’ll still have to wait and see.  I’m sure he still has many more great years ahead of him.”

“I’m extremely proud,” Djokovic said.  “It’s a huge relief.  That’s the first feeling that I will feel after the tournament.  Whether I’m winning it or losing it, in finals, or whenever I finish, it’s just a huge relief.

“Especially in the Grand Slams, you know, you play every second day, but you have to encounter many different things on and off the court.  It’s biggest events in sport.  So many people asking you different questions.  There’s expectations from yourself, your team, people around you.

“Yeah, you know, you need to be able to accept it and live with that.  It’s not easy because it takes a lot of energy from you and from every aspect. So that’s the first thing, is a relief, it’s over.

“And obviously it’s nicer when you get to have the trophy with it, as well.

 

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Serena Williams Wins Wimbledon for 21st Major Title, 2nd “Serena Slam”

(July 11, 2015) Serena Williams made all sorts of history on Saturday in winning her sixth Wimbledon title 6-4, 6-4 over No. 20 Gabine Muguruza. She completed a second “Serena Slam” winning her fourth straight major dating back to the 2014 U.S. Open, won the third leg of the calendar slam and at 21 majors won, she is a major away from tying Steffi Graf at 22 and two behind All-time major winner Margaret Court, and if she wins the U. S Open, she’ll be the first woman to win the Grand Slam since Graf did in in 1988. Williams also held all four majors at once from 2002-2003 – 2002 French Open, Wimbledon and U.S. Open and the 2003 Australian Open.

The No. 1 player is the oldest woman to win a major at 33-years and 289 days. She’s won eight majors as a “30-something.”

“I can’t believe I’m standing here at another Grand Slam, so it’s really cool,” Williams said on-court after the match. “I’m having so much fun out here. I just never dreamt I would be out here still and let alone winning.”

So what’s the key to winning four majors in a row? Williams was asked about this and said: “I don’t know. I know just last year I was just so down because I lost so early in three of the Grand Slams.  By the time New York came around, I was like, I just want to get to the quarterfinal of a Grand Slam.  When I won my fourth round match, I was elated.  I was like, Yeah, finally.

“I’ve just been super relaxed.  I’ve been taking time every match.  I didn’t have an easy go this tournament, but I still just take it one match at a time.”

The American started out slowly, broken in her opening service game and falling behind 2-4, before regrouping to win four straight games to close out the set.

Muguruza upset Williams in the second round of last year’s French Open.

Williams raced off to 5-1 lead in the second, broken both times serving for the match at 5-1 and 5-3. Muguruza saved a match point. Williams closed out the win breaking her Spanish opponent at 5-4.

“It was definitely a little pressure toward the end, but I think Garbine just started playing really well and started hitting some great shots so that made it even harder,” Williams said.

The 21-year-old Muguruza was playing in her first major final, the first Spanish woman slam final since 2000.

“I’m very happy and proud to be playing in front of this amazing crowd,” Muguruza said “I love to play on big courts, and a Grand Slam final is just a dream come true for me.

“But I also want to say congratulations to Serena. She’s showing us she’s still World No.1.”

“It’s hard to concentrate on a final because you have Serena in front of you.  You’re thinking, She won five times this.  You’re like this.  Is your first final.  You know that you don’t have so many chances to win the match.”

“Garbine played so well,” Williams said. “I didn’t even know it was over – she was fighting so hard at the end. Congratulations, don’t be sad, you’ll be holding this trophy very, very soon, believe me!

“I can’t believe I’m standing here with another Serena Slam. It’s really cool. And the crowd helped me through it – I heard all the ‘I love yous’ and I love you more! It’s such an honor. It feels so good.”

“It is really a great feeling,” Williams said to media.  “Just the moment is still setting in a little bit.  I’m just really excited about it because I didn’t want to talk about the Serena Slam. I honestly wouldn’t have thought last year after winning the US Open I would win the Serena Slam at all.

“It’s super exciting.  I just knew I wanted to win Wimbledon this year.  Of all the Grand Slams, it was the one I hadn’t won in a while.  It was like, I really want to win Wimbledon.  It happened.”

“I’m going to leave here being really motivated,” said the Spanish woman.  “I think I’m the most motivated person right now.  This gives me a lot of, you know, power to keep practicing and improving, to see what else I can do in my next tournaments.

“I’m playing really good.  So keep working and see now the hard court season.”

“I don’t feel disappointment,” Muguruza said of the loss.  “But you never know how many chances you’re going to have to play a final in a Grand Slam. But if you have to choose who to win or who to lose, I would choose Serena.”

“I think she’s (Muguruza) such a great player. Like I said, she’s beaten me before. I think she really stepped up to the plate today.  She was determined to do well and to win.  She came out there to win.  She wasn’t out there just to play a final.  I think that says a lot about her and her future.

“She never gave up literally ever.”

“I couldn’t stop crying,” Muguruza commenting about her tears during the trophy presentation and the standing ovation given to her by the crowd.  “So many people are clapping.  I don’t know. I make all these people feel this in a tennis court?  I was like, I don’t know.  I felt special.”

On winning another “Serena Slam:” “I’ve been trying to win four in a row for 12 years, and it hasn’t happened. I’ve had a couple injuries.  You know, it’s been an up‑and‑down process.

“I honestly can’t say that last year or two years ago or even five years ago I would have thought that I would have won four in a row.  So just starting this journey, having all four trophies at home, is incredible.”

Williams will head into the U.S. Open to try to become the first woman since 1988 to win the Grand Slam.

“I feel like I’ll be okay,” Williams said.  “I feel like if I can do the Serena Slam, I will be okay heading into the Grand Slam. Like I always say, there’s 127 other people that don’t want to see me win.  Nothing personal, they just want to win.

“So it’s just, you know, going to go in there.  I had a really tough draw.  This gives me confidence that if I had this draw, I can do it again.  I’ll just do the best I can.

“You know, I really don’t feel like I have anything to lose. I’ve kind of solidified my place at No. 1.  My goal is always to end the year at No. 1.  I just want to make sure when I play Australia, I don’t have pressure going into that.”

 

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Novak Djokovic Versus Roger Federer: Tale of the Tape

228 Federer Djokovic handshake-001

(July 10, 2015) Here is a look at the head-to-head record between 2015 Wimbledon finalists world No 1 Novak Djokovic and No. 2 Roger Federer who will play the final on Sunday:

Head-to-head: Federer leads 20-19

2006     AMS Monte Carlo          Clay (O)           R64      Federer            63 26 63

2006     Davis Cup WG-PO        Hard (I)            R4        Federer            63 62 63

2007     Australian Open          Hard (O)          R16      Federer            62 75 63

2007     Dubai                           Hard (O)           QF       Federer            63 67(6) 63

2007     AMS Montreal               Hard (O)           FR        Djokovic           76(2) 26 76(2)

2007     US Open                      Hard (O)          FR        Federer            76(4) 76(2) 64

2008     Australian Open          Hard (O)          SF        Djokovic          75 63 76(5)

2008     AMS Monte Carlo          Clay (O)           SF        Federer            63 3-2 ret. (illness)

2008     US Open                      Hard (O)          SF        Federer            63 57 75 62

2009     Miami-1000                   Hard (O)           SF        Djokovic           36 62 63

2009     Rome-1000                   Clay (O)           SF        Djokovic           46 63 63

2009     Cincinnati-1000             Hard (O)           FR        Federer            61 75

2009     US Open                      Hard (O)          SF        Federer            76(3) 75 75

2009     Basel                            Hard (I)            FR        Djokovic           64 46 62

2010     Toronto-1000                Hard (O)           SF        Federer            61 36 75

2010     US Open                      Hard (O)          SF        Djokovic          57 61 57 62 75

2010     Shanghai                      Hard (O)           SF        Federer            75 64

2010     Basel                            Hard (I)            FR        Federer            64 36 61

2010     ATP World Tour Finals  Hard (I)            SF        Federer            61 64

2011     Australian Open           Hard (O)         SF       Djokovic           76(3) 75 64

2011     Dubai                           Hard (O)           FR                   Djokovic         63 63

2011   Indian Wells-1000         Hard (O)          SF       Djokovic                      63 36 62

2011     Roland Garros             Clay (O)           SF        Federer            76(5) 63 36 76(5)

2011     US Open                      Hard (O)          SF        Djokovic          67(7) 46 63 62 75

2012     Rome-1000                   Clay (O)           SF        Djokovic           62 76(4)

2012     Roland Garros             Clay(O)                        SF        Djokovic          64 75 63

2012     Wimbledon                  Grass (O)         SF        Federer            63 36 64 63

2012     Cincinnati-1000             Hard (O)           FR        Federer             60 76(7)

2012     ATP World Tour Finals  Hard (I)            FR        Djokovic           76(6) 75

2013     Paris-1000                    Hard (I)            SF        Djokovic           46 63 62

2013     ATP World Tour Finals Hard (I)            RR       Djokovic           64 67(2) 62

2014     Dubai                           Hard (O)           SF        Federer            36 63 62

2014     Indian Wells-1000         Hard (O)           FR        Djokovic           36 63 76(3)

2014     Monte Carlo-1000         Clay (O)           SF        Federer            75 62

2014     Wimbledon                  Grass (O)         FR        Djokovic          67(7) 64 76(4) 57 64

2014     Shanghai-1000              Hard (O)           SF        Federer            64 64

2014     ATP World Tour Finals  Hard (I)            FR        Djokovic           w/o (back)

2015     Dubai                           Hard (O)           FR        Federer            63 75

2015     Indian Wells-1000         Hard (O)           FR        Djokovic           63 67(5) 62

2015     Rome-1000                   Clay (O)           FR        Djokovic           64 63

 

This is the 40th meeting between Djokovic and Federer. This is the 2nd-most matches played in a head-to-head at Tour-level in the Open Era:

 

Novak Djokovic v Rafael Nadal 42
Roger Federer v Novak Djokovic 40
Ivan Lendl v John McEnroe 36
Boris Becker v Stefan EdbergJimmy Connors v Ivan Lendl

Jimmy Connors v John McEnroe

3535
35
Andre Agassi v Pete Sampras 34

 

This is Djokovic and Federer’s 13th Grand Slam encounter which equals the record for most meetings at the majors:

 

  No. of GS match-ups Win-loss
Novak Djokovic v Roger FedererNovak Djokovic v Rafael Nadal 1313 Tied 6-6Nadal leads 9-4
Roger Federer v Rafael Nadal 11 Nadal leads 9-2
Ivan Lendl v John McEnroe 10 Lendl leads 7-3

 

This is the 3rd Grand Slam final meeting between Djokovic and Federer, and the 2nd consecutive Wimbledon final. They have split their previous meetings at this stage of a major. Federer won in straight sets at the 2007 US Open, and Djokovic won in 5 sets here last year. This is also just their 3rd grass court meeting. Federer won their first grass court match in the semifinals at 2012 Wimbledon.

 

This is their 15th meeting in a Tour-level final overall. Djokovic has won 9 of their previous meetings in Tour-level finals, including most recently at 2015 Rome-1000.

 

Federer and Djokovic are both former Wimbledon champions. Five former Wimbledon champions started the event here – 2013 champion Murray lost in the semifinals, 2-time champion Nadal lost in the 2nd round, 2002 winner Lleyton Hewitt lost in the 1st round in his final Wimbledon appearance.

 

DJOKOVIC                                      v                                      FEDERER

 

28                                           Age                                          33

6’2”/1.88m                                  Height                                  6’1”/1.85m

1                                    ATP Ranking                                    2

79,387,657                     Career Earnings (US$)                     90,936,289

53                                         Titles                                         86

199-34                     Career Grand Slam Record                     291-47

8 titles                       Best Grand Slam Result                      17 titles

51-8                             Wimbledon Record                             79-9

651-143                              Career Record                             1036-233

66-15                         Career Record – Grass                        142-19

47-3                                  2015 Record                                  40-6

6-0                             2015 Record – Grass                            11-0

25-8                          Career Five-Set Record                        23-19

4                         Comebacks from 0-2 Down                         9

180-108                       Career Tiebreak Record                      381-206

9-7                            2015 Tiebreak Record                           12-9

 

 

 

Road to the final

DJOKOVIC Time Time FEDERER
d. Philipp Kohlschreiber 64 64 64d. Jarkko Nieminen 64 62 63 2:031:32 1st round2nd round 1:331:34 d. Damir Dzumhur 61 63 63d. Sam Querrey 64 62 62
d. No. 27 Bernard Tomic 63 63 63 1:32 3rd round 1:21 d. Sam Groth 64 64 67(5) 62
d. No. 14 Kevin Anderson 67(6) 67(6) 61 64 75
d. No. 9 Marin Cilic 64 64 64d. No. 21 Richard Gasquet 76(2) 64 64
3:47
1:492:21
Round of 16Quarterfinals

Semifinals

1:342:33

2:07

d. No. 20 Roberto Bautista Agut 62 62 63d. No. 12 Gilles Simon 63 75 62

d. No. 3 Andy Murray 75 75 64

total time on court 13:04 (IBM time) 9:58 total time on court

 

  • Top seed and defending Wimbledon champion DJOKOVIC is bidding to win his 3rd Wimbledon title and equal his coach Boris Becker, who won the title here in 1985-86 and 1989. Just 5 men in the Open Era have won 3 or more Wimbledon titles:


Most Wimbledon men’s singles titles in the Open Era

1= Roger Federer
Pete Sampras
7
7
3. Bjorn Borg 5
4= Boris Becker
John McEnroe
3
3
6= Jimmy Connors
Stefan Edberg
Novak Djokovic
Rod Laver
Rafael Nadal
John Newcombe
2
2
2
2
2
2

 

  • Djokovic is bidding to win his 9th Grand Slam title and take sole ownership of 8th place on the all-time list for most major titles. He has won titles at the Australian Open in 2008 (d. Jo-Wilfried Tsonga), 2011 (d. Andy Murray), 2012
    (d. Nadal), 2013 (d. Murray) and 2015 (d. Murray); at Wimbledon in 2011 (d. Nadal) and 2014 (d. Federer); and at the 2011 US Open (d. Nadal).

 

All-time Grand Slam men’s singles titles

1. 17 Roger Federer
2= 14 Rafael Nadal
Pete Sampras
4. 12 Roy Emerson
5= 11 Bjorn BorgRod Laver
7. 10 Bill Tilden
8= 8 Andre AgassiJimmy Connors

Novak Djokovic

Ivan Lendl

Fred Perry

Ken Rosewall

 

  • If Djokovic wins his 9th Grand Slam title at 2015 Wimbledon he will be the oldest player to win 9 titles at the Grand Slams in the Open Era:

 

Player Age on winning 9th Grand Slam title Grand Slam event
Bjorn Borg 24 years 2 days 1980 Roland Garros
Rafael Nadal 24 years 101 days 2010 US Open
Roger Federer 25 years 33 days 2006 US Open
Pete Sampras 25 years 167 days 1997 Australian Open
Novak Djokovic?? 28 years 51 days?? 2015 Wimbledon??

 

  • Djokovic has an 8-8 win-loss record in his 16 previous Grand Slam finals and a 2-1 win-loss record in Wimbledon finals. His only loss in a Wimbledon final came against Andy Murray:

                                          

                                             Djokovic’s record in Grand Slam finals

Grand Slam Final Result
2007 US Open l. Roger Federer 76(4) 76(2) 64
2008 Australian Open d. Jo-Wilfried Tsonga 46 64 63 76(2)
2010 US Open l. Rafael Nadal 64 57 64 62
2011 Australian Open d. Andy Murray 64 62 63
2011 Wimbledon d. Rafael Nadal 64 61 16 63
2011 US Open d. Rafael Nadal 62 64 67(3) 61
2012 Australian Open d. Rafael Nadal 57 64 62 67(5) 75
2012 Roland Garros l. Rafael Nadal 64 63 26 75
2012 US Open l. Andy Murray 76(10) 75 26 36 62
2013 Australian Open d. Andy Murray 67(2) 76(3) 63 62
2013 Wimbledon l. Andy Murray 64 75 64
2013 US Open l. Rafael Nadal 62 36 64 61
2014 Roland Garros l. Rafael Nadal 36 75 62 64
2014 Wimbledon d. Roger Federer 67(7) 64 76(4) 57 64
2015 Australian Open d. Andy Murray 76(5) 67(4) 63 60
2015 Roland Garros l. Stan Wawrinka 46 64 64 64
2015 Wimbledon v. Roger Federer

 

  • Djokovic is looking to become just the 7th man to win 200 Grand Slam matches in history. He overtook Rafael Nadal at this year’s Wimbledon and goes into this year’s final with a 199-34 win-loss record. The leading all-time performers are as follows:

 

Most Grand Slam match-wins (all-time)

Rank Player Win-loss
12 Roger FedererJimmy Connors 291-47233-49
3 Andre Agassi 224-53
45 Ivan LendlRoy Emerson 222-49217-48
67

8

Pete SamprasNovak Djokovic

Rafael Nadal

203-38199-34

196-28

910 Stefan EdbergKen Rosewall 178-47171-34

Note: active players in bold

 

  • Djokovic is through to his 4th final here and has moved into joint-8th place with Goran Ivanisevic for the most Wimbledon finals reached in the Open Era.

 

Wimbledon finals reached (Open Era)

Player No. of finals
Roger Federer 10
Boris BeckerPete Sampras 7
Bjorn BorgJimmy Connors 6
John McEnroeRafael Nadal 5
Novak DjokovicGoran Ivanisevic 44

 

  • Djokovic is just the 7th different man in the Open Era to reach the first three Grand Slam finals in a calendar year. Rod Laver (1969), Bjorn Borg (1978, 1980 and 1981), John McEnroe (1984), Ivan Lendl (1986), Jim Courier (1993) and today’s opponent (2006, 2007 and 2009) have also achieved the feat.

 

  • Djokovic is also bidding to be the first man to retain the Wimbledon title since today’s opponent in 2007. It has been 8 years since anyone retained the title at Wimbledon. This is the longest period without a successful title defence at any of the majors [see preview page 2]

 

  • Djokovic is through to his 17th Grand Slam final and has equalled Rod Laver in 5th place on the all-time list of most appearances in Grand Slam finals:

 

1 Roger Federer 26
2 Rafael Nadal 20
3 Ivan Lendl 19
4 Pete Sampras 18
5= Novak DjokovicRod Laver 1717
7= Bjorn Borg 16
Ken Rosewall 16

 

  • Djokovic has not played a Tour-level grass court warm-up event before Wimbledon since he played at Queen’s in 2010. He is one of just 7 different men in the Open Era to have won the Wimbledon title without contesting a grass court warm-up event – in 2011 and 2014. Bjorn Borg won all 5 of his Wimbledon titles straight off the clay court season:

Stan Smith        1972                 Andre Agassi                1992

Jan Kodes        1973                 Roger Federer              2007, 2009

Bjorn Borg        1976-80            Novak Djokovic             2011, 2014

Boris Becker     1989

 

  • Djokovic is bidding to record his 52nd Wimbledon match-win and take sole ownership of 6th place on the list for most Wimbledon victories in the Open Era. By defeating Marin Cilic in the quarterfinals here, Djokovic recorded his 50th Wimbledon match-win.

 

Player                          Win-loss

Jimmy Connors            84-18
Roger Federer              78-9
Boris Becker                 71-12
Pete Sampras               63-7
John McEnroe              59-11                           
Bjorn Borg                    51-4
Novak Djokovic            51-8

  • By defeating Cilic in the quarterfinals here, Djokovic recorded his 650th Tour-level match-win. Just 2 active players have won more matches than Djokovic – Roger Federer (1036 wins) and Rafael Nadal (740).

 

  • Djokovic is guaranteed to remain at No. 1 when the ATP rankings are released on Monday 13 July, regardless of his result here.

 

  • Djokovic’s 5-set win over Kevin Anderson in the round of 16 was his 4th career comeback from 0-2 down and improved his winning streak in 5-set matches to 5. It was his first 0-2 comeback since defeating Andreas Seppi at 2012 Roland Garros.

 

  • Last year here Djokovic won his 2nd Wimbledon title, defeating today’s opponent in 5 sets in the final. He was the first top seed to win the Wimbledon title since today’s opponent in 2007 and the 11th man to win multiple Wimbledon titles in the Open Era.

 

  • Djokovic has won 5 titles so far this year – at the Australian Open (d. Murray), Indian Wells-1000
    (d. today’s opponent), Miami-1000 (d. Murray), Monte Carlo-1000 (d. Tomas Berdych) and Rome-1000 (d. today’s opponent) – to extend his streak of winning at least 2 titles every year since winning his first at 2006 Amersfoort
    (d. Nicolas Massu). Just 2 of his 53 career singles titles have come on grass – at 2011 and 2014 Wimbledon.

 

  • In Grand Slam play so far this year Djokovic became just the 2nd man in history to win 5 or more Australian Open titles after Roy Emerson (6). He also finished as runner-up at Roland Garros – becoming just the 5th man in history to reach 3 finals at all 4 Grand Slams – before Stan Wawrinka ended his 28-match Tour-level winning streak in the final. This is his first event since then.

 

  • This is Djokovic’s 11th consecutive appearance at Wimbledon and his 43rd straight Grand Slam overall, which puts him in joint 10th-place with Guillermo Garcia-Lopez on the list for most consecutive Grand Slam appearances in the Open Era.

 

  • Djokovic won his 8th straight Davis Cup singles rubber and also the decisive doubles with Nenad Zimonjic in Serbia’s 5-0 World Group first round victory over Croatia in Kraljevo in March. Serbia will play Argentina in the quarterfinals in Buenos Aires on 17-19 July.

 

  • Djokovic is the only male Serbian Grand Slam champion and also the only Serbian man to appear in a Grand Slam final.

 

  • Djokovic is coached by 3-time Wimbledon champion Boris Becker. He has also been coached by Marian Vajda since June 2006. His wider team includes physios Miljan Amanovic and Gebhard Phil-Gritsch.

 

 

  • 7-time Wimbledon champion FEDERER is bidding to become the first man to win 8 Wimbledon singles titles. Martina Navratilova (9) and Helen Wills Moody (8) are the only women to have won 8 or more singles titles here.

 

  • Federer is also bidding to become the second man in history to win 8 titles at any Grand Slam event. Rafael Nadal became the first man to achieve this feat by winning his 8th Roland Garros title in 2013.

 

Most titles at the same Grand Slam tournament

Player Grand Slam Titles Years
Rafael Nadal Roland Garros 9 2005-08, 2010-2014
Richard Sears US Championships 7 1881-87**
William Renshaw Wimbledon 7 1881-86, 1889
Bill Larned US Championships 7 1901-02, 1907-11**
Bill Tilden US Championships 7 1920-25, 1929
Pete Sampras Wimbledon 7 1993-95, 1997-2000
Roger Federer Wimbledon 7 2003-07, 2009, 2012

** Challenge round played through 1911 at US Championships

  • Federer, who is 33 years 338 days old, is bidding to become the oldest Wimbledon champion in the Open

Era. The oldest man to win Wimbledon in the Open Era is Arthur Ashe who was 31 years 360 days old when he won the title here in 1975. The oldest woman to win Wimbledon is Navratilova, who was 33 years 263 days when she won the 1990 title.

 

  • Federer is also looking to become the 3rd oldest man to win a Grand Slam title in the Open Era after Ken Rosewall, who won titles at the 1972 Australian Open (37 years 62 days), 1971 Australian Open (36 years 73 days) and 1970 US Open (35 years 315 days), and Andres Gimeno, who won 1972 Roland Garros (34 years 306 days).

 

  • Federer, who won 2012 Wimbledon aged 30 years 335 days, is looking to become the fifth man in the Open Era to win 2 or more Grand Slams titles after turning 30. Andre Agassi was the last man to achieve the feat, winning the Australian Open in 2001 at 30 years 274 days and again aged 32 years 272 days in 2003.

Players aged over 30 to win 2 or more Grand Slams (Open Era)

Player Titles won aged over 30 Years
Rod Laver 4 1969
Ken Rosewall 4 1968, 1970, 1971, 1972
Andre Agassi 2 2001, 2003
Jimmy Connors 2 1982, 1983

 

  • By winning his 17th Grand Slam title at 2012 Wimbledon, Federer extended his lead at the top of the all-time Grand Slam titles list in men’s tennis. Bidding for his 18th major title here in London, he now targets the records of the 6 women who have won more Grand Slam singles titles:

All-time Grand Slam singles title leaders (men and women)

Rank No. of titles Player
1. 24 Margaret Court
2. 22 Steffi Graf
3. 20* Serena Williams
4. 19 Helen Wills Moody
5= 18 Chris EvertMartina Navratilova
7. 17 Roger Federer

*Serena Williams could win her 21st Grand Slam title if she wins 2015 Wimbledon

 

  • Wimbledon is Federer’s most successful Grand Slam event in terms of titles won, matches won and finals reached. He hasn’t reached a Grand Slam final away from Wimbledon since he finished as runner-up at 2011 Roland Garros.

 

Titles won Win-loss record Finals reached
Australian Open 4 75-12 5
Roland Garros 1 65-16 5
Wimbledon 7 79-9 10
US Open 5 72-10 6

 

  • Federer has a 17-8 record in Grand Slam finals, going into today’s match:

Federer in Grand Slam finals

Event Result
2003 Wimbledon d. Mark Philippoussis 76(5) 62 76(3)
2004 Australian Open d. Marat Safin 76(3) 64 62
2004 Wimbledon d. Andy Roddick 46 75 76(3) 64
2004 US Open d. Lleyton Hewitt 60 76(3) 60
2005 Wimbledon d. Andy Roddick 62 76(2) 64
2005 US Open d. Andre Agassi 63 26 76(1) 61
2006 Australian Open d. Marcos Baghdatis 57 75 60 62
2006 Roland Garros l. Rafael Nadal 16 61 64 76(4)
2006 Wimbledon d. Rafael Nadal 60 76(5) 67(2) 63
2006 US Open d. Andy Roddick 62 46 75 61
2007 Australian Open d. Fernando Gonzalez 76(2) 64 64
2007 Roland Garros l. Rafael Nadal 63 46 63 64
2007 Wimbledon d. Rafael Nadal 76(7) 46 76(3) 26 62
2007 US Open d. Novak Djokovic 76(4) 76(2) 64
2008 Roland Garros l. Rafael Nadal 61 63 60
2008 Wimbledon l. Rafael Nadal 64 64 67(5) 67(8) 97
2008 US Open d. Andy Murray 62 75 62
2009 Australian Open l. Rafael Nadal 75 36 76(3) 36 62
2009 Roland Garros d. Robin Soderling 61 76(1) 64
2009 Wimbledon d. Andy Roddick 57 76(6) 76(5) 36 1614
2009 US Open l. Juan Martin del Potro 36 76(5) 46 76(4) 62
2010 Australian Open d. Andy Murray 63 64 76(11)
2011 Roland Garros l. Rafael Nadal 75 76(3) 57 61
2012 Wimbledon d. Andy Murray 46 75 63 64
2014 Wimbledon l. Novak Djokovic 67(7) 64 76(4) 57 64
2015 Wimbledon v. Novak Djokovic

 

  • Federer is looking for his 2nd victory over a player ranked No. 1 at a Grand Slam. His only previous victory over a world No. 1 at a major came against today’s opponent in the semifinals at 2012 Wimbledon. He has a 1-5 win-loss record against world No. 1 players at the majors overall.

 

  • Federer is in 2nd place on the Open Era list for most match-wins at Wimbledon with a 79-9 win-loss record. Jimmy Connors heads the list with an 84-18 win-loss record here.

 

  • Federer is the most successful active player on grass with a 142-19 career win-loss record and goes into today’s final on an 11-match winning streak. His career-best winning streak on grass is 65 matches (2003 Halle – 2008 Wimbledon final).

 

  • Federer won the Wimbledon junior boys’ title in 1998 and is one of only 4 boys’ champions to have also won the men’s singles title here.

 

Player Boys’ champion Men’s champion
Bjorn Borg 1972 1976-80
Pat Cash 1982 1987
Stefan Edberg                1983 1988, 1990
Roger Federer 1998 2003-07, 2009, 2012

 

  • Federer has reached his 10th Wimbledon final and extended the all-time record that he took sole ownership of at 2012 Wimbledon.

 

                                                        Wimbledon finals reached (all-time)

Player No. of finals
Roger Federer 10
Boris BeckerArthur Gore

Pete Sampras

7
Bjorn BorgJimmy Connors

Rod Laver

6

 

Federer has also reached his 26th Grand Slam final and extended the all-time record that he took sole ownership of at 2009 Wimbledon.

Grand Slam finals reached (all-time)

Player No. of GS finals
Roger Federer 26
Rafael Nadal 20
Ivan Lendl 19
Pete Sampras 18
Novak DjokovicRod Laver 1717

 

  • Last year here Federer reached his 9th Wimbledon final – and his 25th Grand Slam final overall – but lost to today’s opponent in 5 sets. He has a 6-4 win-loss record in 5-set matches here and a 23-19 five-set win loss record overall.

 

  • In 2012, Federer equalled William Renshaw and Pete Sampras’s record of 7 Wimbledon titles by winning his 17th Grand Slam title overall (d. Andy Murray). He also won the title at Wimbledon in 2003-07 and 2009.

 

  • This is Federer’s 17th consecutive appearance at Wimbledon and his 63rd straight Grand Slam event, which extends his record for the longest streak of consecutive Grand Slam Open Era appearances [see Preview page 6]. Since making his Grand Slam debut as a wild card at 1999 Roland Garros he has missed just one major, failing to qualify for the 1999 US Open.

 

  • Prior to coming here Federer won his 8th title at Halle – and his 86th title overall – after defeating Andreas Seppi 76(1) 64 in the final. He became just the 3rd man in the Open Era to win at least 8 titles at a single tournament, joining Rafael Nadal and Guillermo Vilas.

 

  • Federer holds the Open Era record for the most career grass court titles with 15 titles on the surface. In addition to 7 titles at Wimbledon, his other 8 titles were won at 2003-06, 2008 and 2013-15 Halle.

 

  • Federer is coached by 2-time Wimbledon champion Stefan Edberg and Severin Luthi.

 

 

 *Statistics provided by the International Tennis Federation

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