August 28, 2016

US Open Day 1 Schedule of Play for Monday, August 29, 2016

Large-Unisphere-e1293763635704

US Open Day 1 Schedule of Play for Monday, August 29

 

Arthur Ashe Stadium 11:00 AM

Women’s Singles – R1

Roberta Vinci (ITA) [7]

vs.

Anna-Lena Friedsam (GER)

Women’s Singles – R1

Polona Hercog (SLO)

vs.

Angelique Kerber (GER) [2]

Men’s Singles – R1

Rafael Nadal (ESP) [4]

vs.

Denis Istomin (UZB)

Arthur Ashe Stadium7:00 PM

2016 US OPEN OPENING CEREMONY

Men’s Singles – R1

Novak Djokovic (SRB) [1]

vs.

Jerzy Janowicz (POL)

Women’s Singles – R1

Madison Keys (USA) [8]

vs.

Alison Riske (USA)

 

 

Louis Armstrong Stadium11:00 AM

Men’s Singles – R1

Rogerio Dutra Silva (BRA)

vs.

Marin Cilic (CRO) [7]

Women’s Singles – R1

Francesca Schiavone (ITA)

vs.

Svetlana Kuznetsova (RUS) [9]

Women’s Singles – R1

Elise Mertens (BEL)

vs.

Garbiñe Muguruza (ESP) [3]

Men’s Singles – R1

Not Before: 5:30 PM

Jack Sock (USA) [26]

vs.

Taylor Fritz (USA)

 

 

Grandstand11:00 AM

Women’s Singles – R1

Taylor Townsend (USA)

vs.

Caroline Wozniacki (DEN)

Men’s Singles – R1

Not Before: 1:00 PM

John Isner (USA) [20]

vs.

Frances Tiafoe (USA)

Men’s Singles – R1

Jo-Wilfried Tsonga (FRA) [9]

vs.

Guido Andreozzi (ARG)

Women’s Singles – R1

Johanna Konta (GBR) [13]

vs.

Bethanie Mattek-Sands (USA)

 

 

Court 17 11:00 AM

Women’s Singles – R1

Samantha Crawford (USA)

vs.

Belinda Bencic (SUI) [24]

Men’s Singles – R1

Gael Monfils (FRA) [10]

vs.

Gilles Muller (LUX)

Women’s Singles – R1

Magda Linette (POL)

vs.

Dominika Cibulkova (SVK) [12]

Men’s Singles – R1

Not Before: 7:00 PM

Dustin Brown (GER)

vs.

Milos Raonic (CAN) [5]

 

 

Court 5 11:00 AM

Men’s Singles – R1

Kyle Edmund (GBR)

vs.

Richard Gasquet (FRA) [13]

Women’s Singles – R1

Alizé Cornet (FRA)

vs.

Mirjana Lucic-Baroni (CRO)

Men’s Singles – R1

Brian Baker (USA)

vs.

Federico Delbonis (ARG)

Women’s Singles – R1

Barbora Strycova (CZE) [18]

vs.

Monica Niculescu (ROU)

 

P6/Old Grandstand 11:00 AM

Men’s Singles – R1

Jordan Thompson (AUS)

vs.

Steve Darcis (BEL)

Men’s Singles – R1

Vasek Pospisil (CAN)

vs.

Jozef Kovalik (SVK)

Women’s Singles – R1

Monica Puig (PUR) [32]

vs.

Saisai Zheng (CHN)

Women’s Singles – R1

Not Before: 5:00 PM

Mandy Minella (LUX)

vs.

Elina Svitolina (UKR) [22]

 

Court 13 11:00 AM

Women’s Singles – R1

Carina Witthoeft (GER)

vs.

Misaki Doi (JPN) [30]

Women’s Singles – R1

Naomi Osaka (JPN)

vs.

Coco Vandeweghe (USA) [28]

Men’s Singles – R1

Yoshihito Nishioka (JPN)

vs.

Kevin Anderson (RSA) [23]

Men’s Singles – R1

James Duckworth (AUS)

vs.

Robin Haase (NED)

 

Court 4 11:00 AM

Men’s Singles – R1

Thomaz Bellucci (BRA)

vs.

Andrey Kuznetsov (RUS)

Women’s Singles – R1

Yulia Putintseva (KAZ)

vs.

Sabine Lisicki (GER)

Men’s Singles – R1

Dudi Sela (ISR)

vs.

Pablo Cuevas (URU) [18]

Women’s Singles – R1

Madison Brengle (USA)

vs.

Kayla Day (USA)

 

 

Court 6 11:00 AM

Women’s Singles – R1

Andrea Petkovic (GER)

vs.

Kristina Kucova (SVK)

Women’s Singles – R1

Catherine Bellis (USA)

vs.

Viktorija Golubic (SUI)

Men’s Singles – R1

Marcos Baghdatis (CYP)

vs.

Facundo Bagnis (ARG)

Men’s Singles – R1

Lucas Pouille (FRA) [24]

vs.

Mikhail Kukushkin (KAZ)

 

Court 7 11:00 AM

Men’s Singles – R1

Lukas Lacko (SVK)

vs.

Ernesto Escobedo (USA)

Women’s Singles – R1

Maria Sakkari (GRE)

vs.

Ying-Ying Duan (CHN)

Women’s Singles – R1

Tsvetana Pironkova (BUL)

vs.

Virginie Razzano (FRA)

Men’s Singles – R1

Not Before: 5:00 PM

Guillermo Garcia-Lopez (ESP)

vs.

Roberto Bautista Agut (ESP) [15]

 

 

Court 8 11:00 AM

Men’s Singles – R1

Sergiy Stakhovsky (UKR)

vs.

Gastao Elias (POR)

Women’s Singles – R1

Anastasija Sevastova (LAT)

vs.

Anna Karolina Schmiedlova (SVK)

Men’s Singles – R1

Mischa Zverev (GER)

vs.

Pierre-Hugues Herbert (FRA)

Women’s Singles – R1

Su-Wei Hsieh (TPE)

vs.

Kateryna Bondarenko (UKR)

 

Court 9 11:00 AM

Men’s Singles – R1

Julien Benneteau (FRA)

vs.

Albert Ramos-Vinolas (ESP) [31]

Women’s Singles – R1

Yafan Wang (CHN)

vs.

Alison Van Uytvanck (BEL)

Women’s Singles – R1

Danielle Collins (USA)

vs.

Evgeniya Rodina (RUS)

Men’s Singles – R1

Jiri Vesely (CZE)

vs.

Saketh Myneni (IND)

 

Court 11 11:00 AM

Men’s Singles – R1

Bjorn Fratangelo (USA)

vs.

Guido Pella (ARG)

Women’s Singles – R1

Christina McHale (USA)

vs.

Mona Barthel (GER)

Men’s Singles – R1

Jan Satral (CZE)

vs.

Mackenzie McDonald (USA)

Women’s Singles – R1

Aliaksandra Sasnovich (BLR)

vs.

Lauren Davis (USA)

 

Court 12 11:00 AM

Women’s Singles – R1

Petra Kvitova (CZE) [14]

vs.

Jelena Ostapenko (LAT)

Women’s Singles – R1

Sara Errani (ITA) [27]

vs.

Shelby Rogers (USA)

Men’s Singles – R1

Benoit Paire (FRA) [32]

vs.

Dusan Lajovic (SRB)

Men’s Singles – R1

Adrian Mannarino (FRA)

vs.

Ryan Harrison (USA)

 

Court 14 11:00 AM

Men’s Singles – R1

Mikhail Youzhny (RUS)

vs.

Martin Klizan (SVK) [28]

Men’s Singles – R1

Stephane Robert (FRA)

vs.

Andreas Seppi (ITA)

Women’s Singles – R1

Irina-Camelia Begu (ROU) [21]

vs.

Lesia Tsurenko (UKR)

Women’s Singles – R1

Sorana Cirstea (ROU)

vs.

Ana Bogdan (ROU)

 

Court 15 11:00 AM

Women’s Singles – R1

Irina Falconi (USA)

vs.

Cagla Buyukakcay (TUR)

Men’s Singles – R1

Marton Fucsovics (HUN)

vs.

Nicolas Almagro (ESP)

Men’s Singles – R1

Guilherme Clezar (BRA)

vs.

Marco Chiudinelli (SUI)

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San Diego Aviators win first Mylan World TeamTennis championship

(NEW YORK, August 26, 2016) – The San Diego Aviators defeated the Orange County Breakers 25-14 to win their first Mylan World TeamTennis championship on Friday in the Mylan WTT Finals presented by Citi at historic Forest Hills Stadium at The West Side Tennis Club.

 

Darija Jurak (doubles, mixed doubles), Shelby Rogers (women’s singles, doubles) and Raven Klaasen (doubles, mixed doubles) each won two events to lead the top-seeded Aviators.

However it may have been Ryan Harrison who had the most impressive feat of the day. For Harrison, the league’s Male MVP, it was a double victory, as he also qualified for the US Open earlier in the day, dismissing Henri Laaksonen to earn a spot in the main draw. He then made the short drive across the borough of Queens to contribute to Coach John Lloyd’s team in winning the King Trophy.

 

“You’re trying not to get ahead of yourself,” said Harrison of his unique morning-afternoon twin-bill. “You’re focusing completely on your match, but in the back of your mind you’d like to win quickly. I tried to focus in on my service games, get ahead and put them away.”

 

Klaasen, ranked No. 10 in doubles on the ATP World Tour, was named the Mylan WTT Finals MVP presented by Forevermark for his performance. Klaasen, who was presented with a Forevermark diamond after the match, teamed up with Jurak and Harrison to post a pair of 5-2 wins in mixed doubles and men’s doubles.

 

“It feels really nice to get the MVP award but it feels a bit undeserving because our whole team played very well,” said Klaasen who credited team chemistry with their success. “We were apart for four days and when we saw each other again last night, it felt like we had been apart for a year. Our team chemistry has been great. We will friends for the rest of our lives.”

 

Jurak and Klaasen began the afternoon with a 5-2 mixed doubles triumph over the Breakers’ Alla Kudryavtseva and Scott Lipsky. Then Rogers and Nicole Gibbs battled it out in women’s singles, with Rogers upending Gibbs, 5-2, for a 10-4 Aviators advantage.

 

“It’s different playing for your team than just singles for myself,” said Rogers after the singles win, in which she rallied from down 1-2 and facing a game point in what may have been the turning point of the match.

 

Next was men’s doubles, with the duo of Harrison and Klaasen extending the Aviators’ advantage to a commanding 15-6 with another 5-2 set triumph, over Scott Lipsky and Dennis Novikov. Women’s doubles was next, with Rogers and Jurak teaming to topple Gibbs and Kudryavtseva by that same 5-2 score.

 

Men’s singles completed the day, as the Breakers’ Dennis Novikov salvaged the only set win, 5-4, to keep Orange County alive, Harrison then closed out the championship by winning the second Extended Play game. League co-founder Billie Jean King and Mylan WTT CEO/Commissioner Ilana Kloss presented the Aviators, including team owners Fred Luddy and Jack McGrory, with the their first King Trophy.

 

Winning the title at Forest Hills Stadium was also special for Lloyd who was named as the 2016 Mylan WTT Coach of the Year earlier this month. “It brings a lot of memories back; I played back in the US Open when it was on grass and clay,” added Lloyd, in his second year at the helm of the new champions. “In fact on this court I lost to the great Bjorn Borg. It was nice to play on this beautiful court. To come back and win this title was great.”

 

 

 

Mylan World TeamTennis Finals presented by Citi

SAN DIEGO AVIATORS def. Orange County Breakers 25-14 (EP)

 

Mixed Doubles – Darija Jurak\Raven Klaasen (Aviators) def. Alla Kudryavtseva\Scott Lipsky (Breakers) 5-2

Women’s Singles – Shelby Rogers (Aviators) def. Nicole Gibbs (Breakers) 5-2

Men’s Doubles – Ryan Harrison\Raven Klaasen (Aviators) def. Scott Lipsky\Dennis Novikov (Breakers) 5-2

Women’s Doubles – Darija Jurak\Shelby Rogers (Aviators) def. Nicole Gibbs\Alla Kudryavtseva (Breakers) 5-2

Men’s Singles – Dennis Novikov (Breakers) def. Ryan Harrison (Aviators) 5-4

Extended Play – Men’s Singles – Ryan Harrison (Aviators) tied Dennis Novikov (Breakers) 1-1

 

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Top Seeds Novak Djokovic and Serena Williams Come Into US Open Overcoming Injuries

August 26, 2016 - Photos from the US Open Draw Ceremony during the 2016 US Open at the USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center in Flushing, NY. Michael LeBrecht/USTA

August 26, 2016 – Photos from the US Open Draw Ceremony during the 2016 US Open at the USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center in Flushing, NY. Michael LeBrecht/USTA

(August 26, 2016) FLUSHING MEADOWS, New York – The two top seeds at the 2016 U.S. Open enter the tournament coming back from injuries. The world No. 1 man, Novak Djokovic said that he’s “getting there” in terms of his wrist injury.

The 12-time major champion talked about how his injury came about: “It happened actually in Rio, just few days before the start of the tournament,” said the Serb. I did experience this for the first time in my career. Never had this particular wrist injury before. I played against (Juan Martin) Del Potro, who unfortunately was absent from the tour for the wrist injury himself.

“You know, it was interesting for me to experience how was it and how it is for him for so many years struggling with that essential part of your body as a tennis player.

“Yeah, after undergoing certain treatments I’ve gotten better. I’m just hoping that Monday when the tournament starts I’ll be able to, as I said, get as close to the maximum of executing my backhand shot as possible.”

 

Twenty-two-time major winner and No. 1 Serena Williams had been dealing with a shoulder injury. “I have not played a lot, I haven’t practiced a lot, but I’m just now starting to feel a little better, she said.

“I’m really fit right now,” Williams continued. “I mean, I think I did serve pretty well at Wimbledon this year. I felt like I was able to hit aces when I wanted to. So, yeah, couple months ago, couple — few weeks ago.”

 

Both top players will face challenges in the very first round. Williams will be facing Russia’s Ekaterina Makarova, who upset Williams in the round of 16 at the 2012 Australian Open.

Commenting on her opponent she said, “she’s a big fighter. She never really stops.

“I think one thing I think that’s pretty impressive is she’s pretty — she gets a lot of balls back. You think she’s not super quick, but she is.”

 

Could potentially meet her sister Venus in the semifinals.

Djokovic will face off against a former Wimbledon semifinalist, once ranked 14th in the world, Poland’s Jerzy Janowicz.

 

Two-time U.S. Open winner and 14-time major title holder Rafael Nadal could face Djokovic in the semifinals, is also coming off a wrist injury. Nadal won the gold medal in doubles at the Rio Olympics.

“I am a little bit better,” talking about the wrist injury. “It’s obvious that when you have been outside two months and a half you need a little bit of time.

“I try to go quick, especially in the Olympics and then competing last week in Cincinnati, but the wrist still bothers me a little bit. It’s true that the wrist bothers me a little bit less every day. I need to understand again to hit my normal forehand.

“During the wrist injury always you try to find movements to avoid the pain. So I think today I can start the forehand, I think my normal forehand, but still needs time to feel that I am more confident on my wrist.

“But I am practicing well and I am competing well, I think.”

 

The fourth seed Nadal will open his quest for another title in Flushing Meadows against Denis Istomin.

No. 2 Andy Murray and No. 3 seed Stan Wawrinka are on the other side of the draw.

 

A potential dangerous floater in silver medalist and 2009 U.S. Open champion Juan Martin del Potro who sits on Murray’s side of the draw in Stan Wawrinka’s quarter.

 

The No. 2 seed in the women’s draw is Angelique Kerber who missed a chance to become No. 1 in the world when she lost the final of Cincinnati. The German also lost in the gold medal final of the Olympics to Monica Puig.

Asked about her confidence after these two tough losses she said: “Actually, to be honest, I’m feeling good, because I have great matches in the last weeks, and especially a lot of positive emotions. I mean, of course I have two tough matches in the finals, but I played not bad. I mean, my opponent is playing good in these matches.

“But I have a lot of confidence to being here again, having a lot of time now for practicing and preparing for the last Grand Slam of the year.”

 

Men’s Draw

Women’s Draw

 

Karen Pestaina for Tennis Panorama at the U. S. Open.

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US Open Qualifying Tournament – Schedule of Play for Friday, August 26, 2016

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US Open Qualifying Tournament – Schedule of Play for Friday, August 26, 2016

Court 17 11:00 AM

Women’s Qualifying Singles – R3

Women’s Qualifying Singles – R3

Men’s Qualifying Singles – R3

Not Before: 2:00 PM

Court 5 11:00 AM

Men’s Qualifying Singles – R3

Women’s Qualifying Singles – R3

Women’s Qualifying Singles – R3

Not Before: 2:00 PM

Men’s Qualifying Singles – R3

Not Before: 3:30 PM

Court 13 11:00 AM

Men’s Qualifying Singles – R3

Women’s Qualifying Singles – R3

Women’s Qualifying Singles – R3

Not Before: 2:00 PM
Court 4 11:00 AM

Women’s Qualifying Singles – R3

Men’s Qualifying Singles – R3

Men’s Qualifying Singles – R3

Not Before: 3:30 PM

Court 6 11:00 AM

Men’s Qualifying Singles – R3

Men’s Qualifying Singles – R3

Not Before: 12:30 PM

Men’s Qualifying Singles – R3

Not Before: 2:00 PM

 

Court 9 11:00 AM

Women’s Qualifying Singles – R3

Men’s Qualifying Singles – R3

Women’s Qualifying Singles – R3

Not Before: 3:30 PM

Court 11 11:00 AM

Women’s Qualifying Singles – R3

Men’s Qualifying Singles – R3

Not Before: 12:30 PM

Women’s Qualifying Singles – R3

Not Before: 2:00 PM

Men’s Qualifying Singles – R3

Court 12 11:00 AM

Women’s Qualifying Singles – R3

Women’s Qualifying Singles – R3

Men’s Qualifying Singles – R3

Not Before: 2:00 PM

Court 14 11:00 AM

Men’s Qualifying Singles – R3

Men’s Qualifying Singles – R3

Not Before: 12:30 PM

Women’s Qualifying Singles – R3

Not Before: 3:00 PM

Court 15 11:00 AM

Women’s Qualifying Singles – R3

Men’s Qualifying Singles – R3

Not Before: 12:30 PM

Women’s Qualifying Singles – R3

Not Before: 2:00 PM
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Kei Nishikori Clinches Emirates Airline US Open Series Title

Kei Nishikori

Kei Nishikori

 

KEI NISHIKORI CLINCHES EMIRATES AIRLINE US OPEN SERIES MEN’S TITLE

Nishikori Wins First Emirates Airline US Open Series Title – 2014 US Open Finalist Will Now Compete for a Record $4.5 Million Payout at US Open

Women’s Bonus Challenge to be Decided This Weekend at Connecticut Open

From the USTA – August 25, 2016 – World No. 7 and 2014 US Open finalist Kei Nishikori clinched the 2016 Emirates US open Series men’s title tonight, with Viktor Trocki’s victory over Fernando Verdasco in the quarterfinals of the Winston-Salem Open in Winston-Salem, N.C. Nishikori will now attempt to set a record for the largest payout in tennis history at the US Open – $4.5 million; $3.5 million for winning the US Open and a $1 million bonus for winning the US Open as Emirates Airline US Open Series champion.

Nishikori finishes the Bonus Challenge with 85 points – 70 for reaching the Rogers Cup final in Toronto and 15 for advancing to the Round of 16 at the Western & Southern Open in Cincinnati. Verdasco was the only remaining player in Winston-Salem who could have overtaken him in the final standings.

Grigor Dimitrov finishes second in the men’s Bonus Challenge, while 2014 Emirates Airline US Open Series men’s champion Milos Raonic finishes third. Both players tied with 70 points; Dimitrov finishes second based on tiebreakers, having won seven matches on the Series this summer, as opposed to Raonic’s five. The second and third place finishers will compete for US Open bonus payouts of $500,000 and $250,000, respectively.

Novak Djokovic and Marin Cilic each earned 100 points for their Rogers Cup and Western & Southern Open victories, respectively. Players must earn points in two or more Emirates Airline US Open Series events to be eligible for the final Bonus Challenge standings and US Open bonus prize money.

The women’s Bonus Challenge will be decided this week at the Connecticut Open in New Haven, where Agnieszka Radwanska can overtake current leader Johanna Konta by winning the title.

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US Open Qualifying Tournament – Schedule of Play for Thursday, August 25, 2016

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US Open Qualifying Tournament – Schedule of Play for Thursday, August 25, 2016

Court 17 11:00 AM

Men’s Qualifying Singles – R2

Men’s Qualifying Singles – R2

Women’s Qualifying Singles – R2

Women’s Qualifying Singles – R2

Men’s Qualifying Singles – R2

Court 5 11:00 AM

Women’s Qualifying Singles – R2

Women’s Qualifying Singles – R2

Men’s Qualifying Singles – R2

Women’s Qualifying Singles – R2

Men’s Qualifying Singles – R2

Court 13 11:00 AM

Men’s Qualifying Singles – R2

Men’s Qualifying Singles – R2

Men’s Qualifying Singles – R2

Men’s Qualifying Singles – R2

Women’s Qualifying Singles – R2

Court 4 11:00 AM

Men’s Qualifying Singles – R2

Women’s Qualifying Singles – R2

Women’s Qualifying Singles – R2

Women’s Qualifying Singles – R2

Men’s Qualifying Singles – R2

Court 6 11:00 AM

Women’s Qualifying Singles – R2

Women’s Qualifying Singles – R2

Men’s Qualifying Singles – R2

Women’s Qualifying Singles – R2

Women’s Qualifying Singles – R2

Court 8 11:00 AM

Men’s Qualifying Singles – R2

Women’s Qualifying Singles – R2

Men’s Qualifying Singles – R2

Women’s Qualifying Singles – R2

Women’s Qualifying Singles – R2

Court 9 11:00 AM

Women’s Qualifying Singles – R2

Men’s Qualifying Singles – R2

Men’s Qualifying Singles – R2

Women’s Qualifying Singles – R2

Men’s Qualifying Singles – R2

Court 11 11:00 AM

Women’s Qualifying Singles – R2

Women’s Qualifying Singles – R2

Men’s Qualifying Singles – R2

Men’s Qualifying Singles – R2

Men’s Qualifying Singles – R2

Court 12 11:00 AM

Women’s Qualifying Singles – R2

Men’s Qualifying Singles – R2

Women’s Qualifying Singles – R2

Women’s Qualifying Singles – R2

Men’s Qualifying Singles – R2

Court 14 11:00 AM

Women’s Qualifying Singles – R2

Women’s Qualifying Singles – R2

Men’s Qualifying Singles – R2

Men’s Qualifying Singles – R2

Women’s Qualifying Singles – R2

Court 15 11:00 AM

Men’s Qualifying Singles – R2

Women’s Qualifying Singles – R2

Men’s Qualifying Singles – R2

Men’s Qualifying Singles – R2

Men’s Qualifying Singles – R2

Court 16 11:00 AM

Men’s Qualifying Singles – R2

Women’s Qualifying Singles – R2

Women’s Qualifying Singles – R2

Men’s Qualifying Singles – R2

Men’s Qualifying Singles – R2

Court P6 11:00 AM The”Old” Grandstand

Women’s Qualifying Singles – R2

Women’s Qualifying Singles – R2

Men’s Qualifying Singles – R2

Women’s Qualifying Singles – R2

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From Rio Olympics to Flushing Meadows, Barbados’ Olympian Darian King Advances at US Open Qualifying

(August 23, 2016) FLUSHING MEADOWS – Barbados’ Darian King advanced to the second round of the US Open Qualifying tournament on Tuesday with a comeback victory over 31st seed Grega Zemlja 4-6, 6-4, 6-4 on Court 5.

 

King was up a break in the first set, but could not hold it. In the second set he went up two breaks against the hard-serving Slovenian, which he said was the turning point of the match.

“I think we both played great tennis,” he said. “And I’m glad that I kept (my) focus and got a great victory over Zemlja.

 

The 24-year-old born in Bridgetown, Barbados is currently ranked at No. 167 on the ATP World Tour. He just participated in the Rio Olympic Games, where he lost in the first round to No. 22 Steve Johnson 6-3, 6-2.

 

“It was great for me,” King said of his Olympic experience. “Coming from a Caribbean country, the only person that was there, it was a great achievement.”

 

“Also playing against a Top 20 player, everybody wants to play against the top players and for me to participate for my country against a Top 20 player, I think it was a great experience for me overall.”

 

Asked about if there is more pressure playing in the Olympic Games or the US Open Qualies, he said: No pressure. I’ve been playing the sport for at least five years and I don’t think there is any pressure, it’s what you train for. To train hard and hope it comes out in a match. I’m a guy who never gets nervous against anyone because I train hard for this, I’m willing to play anyone who comes up.”

 

King, who also plays Davis Cup for Barbados, has won two challenger events this summer just prior to the Olympic Games – one in Binghamton, New York and the other in Cali, Colombia.

 

“I’m transitioning from the Future to the Challengers,” he said. “It was a big move for, the first time out playing a lot of Challengers – two-time victory in the Challengers is a great achievement for me. It shows the progress I’ve been doing, the hard work I’ve been putting in. Hopefully after the US Open, I’ll continue playing Challengers more.”

 

King hopes to raise his ranking to 150 this year, a goal he set for himself in the beginning of 2016. “That’s what I’m really aiming for. It’s going to be tough because the margin from 170 to 150 is a big margin. Have to play in the big tournaments and hopefully do well in them.”

 

King will face Kazaakh Aleksandr Nedovyesov in the second round of the US Open Qualies on Thursday. The 29-year-old Nedovyesov is ranked 218th in the world.

 

Karen Pestaina for Tennis Panorama News at the US Open.

Dustin Brown was in the crowd at Court 5 cheering on Darian King.

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US Open Qualifying Tournament – Schedule of Play for Wednesday, August 24, 2016

 Large-Unisphere-e1293763635704
Court 17 11:00 AM

Men’s Qualifying Singles – R1

Women’s Qualifying Singles – R1

Men’s Qualifying Singles – R1

Men’s Qualifying Singles – R1

Women’s Qualifying Singles – R1

Court 5 11:00 AM

Women’s Qualifying Singles – R1

Women’s Qualifying Singles – R1

Women’s Qualifying Singles – R1

Men’s Qualifying Singles – R1

Women’s Qualifying Singles – R1

Court 13 11:00 AM

Men’s Qualifying Singles – R1

Men’s Qualifying Singles – R1

Women’s Qualifying Singles – R1

Men’s Qualifying Singles – R1

Women’s Qualifying Singles – R1

Court 4 11:00 AM

Men’s Qualifying Singles – R1

Women’s Qualifying Singles – R1

Men’s Qualifying Singles – R1

Women’s Qualifying Singles – R1

Men’s Qualifying Singles – R1

Court 6 11:00 AM

Women’s Qualifying Singles – R1

Men’s Qualifying Singles – R1

Men’s Qualifying Singles – R1

Men’s Qualifying Singles – R1

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Court 8 11:00 AM

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Court 9 11:00 AM

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Court 1111:00 AM

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Court 12 11:00 AM

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Court 1411:00 AM

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Court 15 11:00 AM

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Court 16 11:00 AM

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Court P6 11:00 AM

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US Open Qualifying Tournament – Schedule of Play for Tuesday, August 23, 2016

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Schedule of Play

Day 1 – US Open Qualifying Tournament

Court 17 11:00 AM

Women’s Qualifying Singles – R1

Men’s Qualifying Singles – R1

Women’s Qualifying Singles – R1

Men’s Qualifying Singles – R1

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Court 5 11:00 AM

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Court 13 11:00 AM

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Court 4 11:00 AM

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Court 6 11:00 AM

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Court 8 11:00 AM

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Court 9 11:00 AM

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Court 11 11:00 AM

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Court 12 11:00 AM

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Women’s Qualifying Singles – R1

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Women’s Qualifying Singles – R1

Court 14 11:00 AM

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Court 15 11:00 AM

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Court 16 11:00 AM

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Court P6 11:00 AM

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Men’s Qualifying Singles – R1

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On The Call: US Open / ESPN Conference Call with Programming’s Scott Guglielmino and Jamie Reynolds of Production

ESPN

(August 18, 2016) ESPN tennis executives Scott Guglielmino, senior vice president, programming, and Jamie Reynolds, vice president, production spoke with media Thursday to discuss the upcoming US Open, and the success and what was learned in last year’s first all-ESPN effort in New York.  Highlights of the call are followed by the full transcript.

 

Soundbites

On:  What impact on TV will the roof on Ashe have?

  • I will say from a broadcasting perspective, we have cameras being built this week as well as next week, and audio technicians down there, assessing what the house looks and feels like, what it sounds like under all conditions, either during the day or at night, under total darkness.  Once you fill it with 20,000 to 25,000 people, it will certainly shape the temperature range, what the wind currents might be. I think we’re all looking forward to what that house can project or optimize for us and how the nuances may affect the game or enhance the game.” – Reynolds

 

On:  Does digital usage negatively impact TV viewing?

  • Our view is and always has been that it is something that’s complementary to the overall audience. I certainly don’t expect – especially coming off of the year we had last year, ratings up on television as well as digital – I don’t expect a scenario whereby the digital piece is going to harm the TV numbers.” – Guglielmino

On:  What makes the US Open in New York special?

  • “I would say also, you put this event in New York, it’s still sports theater….Just the character and the tone of what you get out of New York City in prime time is a very different feel. I think that’s the hallmark of this event, the interactivity of the fans, the crowds, the texture of the celebrities that come through, an event that goes on well past 11:00 or midnight, that’s pretty good. It just has its own identity.” – Reynolds

 

  1. I’m wondering about what you learned from Wimbledon. I know there was some awkwardness with this broadcasters coaching, all the conflicts in tennis, and how you are looking at the Open with regards to what happened at Wimbledon?
    JAMIE REYNOLDS: When you reflect back on the Wimbledon situation, and John operating with the Raonic camp, I think when you look at the roster of talent that we have, you look at this sport in particular, the crossover and the passion of everybody is pretty strong on all fronts.  I would say to you I think we, ESPN, handled that identity of John’s duality as well as some of the other folks on our roster, including Patrick Mouratoglou, who spent some time with us, you look at Darren, Mary Joe Fernandez, her coaching responsibilities, as well as the other extended members of our family, I think we were open and very clear in our relationships with what we expected between their perspectives.I think in a sport, at a championship level, we framed it properly to give the viewer a chance to both appreciate the perspective and the insight that they can offer, but also openly acknowledge the fact that some of these folks are wearing multiple hats. And for the viewer how you assess that, how you might interpret their responses relative to that, either you like them or you think there may be a level of conflict.  At the end of the day from taking care of the viewership, framing the event, I think their perspectives are still very valuable.

    When you go back and look at it historically through a variety of other sport categories, it doesn’t matter whether it’s the van Gundys, the Grudens, even the Grieses, there are a great many relationships, family-wise, that have some sort of attachment in the sports community.  I think the viewership, the audience, can understand and at times respects it and some other times finds that it’s awkward or sideways. At the end of the day I still think they appreciate what that insight and perspective can offer.

    Q. A question about the roof. How much have you all tested it or know what the environment is going to be when it’s closed?
    REYNOLDS: I will say from a broadcasting perspective, we have cameras being built this week as well as next week, and audio technicians down there, assessing what the house looks and feels like, what it sounds like under all conditions, either during the day or at night, under total darkness.

    Once you fill it with 20,000 to 25,000 people, it will certainly shape the temperature range, what the wind currents might be. I think we’re all looking forward to what that house can project or optimize for us and how the nuances may affect the game or enhance the game.

    But I think everyone, including the USTA and the National Tennis Center, broadcasters alike, are looking forward to seeing how the event feels. Certainly it’s going to have a different experience relative to what we see in Australia and what we see at Wimbledon.  I don’t know when you watch or you hear an event at Centre Court at Wimbledon, you know you’re in a fully-enclosed environment. I don’t know that this stadium, this venue, will feel like that.

    Q. We don’t know because it hasn’t been full of 20,000 people.
    REYNOLDS: Yes.

    Q. Seems to me that it’s going to be quite loud when it’s full.
    REYNOLDS: That’s a fair point. When you close the garage doors around the upper perimeter, the roof is sealed and closed, what that does, what the sound does become in there, it’s going to be interesting. I think we’re all looking forward to seeing how it presents itself.

    Q. There’s really no way that you can know what it’s going to be until it happens?
    REYNOLDS: Yeah. Baited anticipation.

    Q. Another roof question. What do you think will be the biggest impact of the fact that now we do know, at least as far as the matches on Arthur Ashe, will more or less occur when they are scheduled to occur throughout the entire two weeks?
    SCOTT GUGLIELMINO: From a programming perspective, it’s going to make things quite a bit easier, both from a scheduling perspective with the tennis center and our colleagues there, but also from a programming perspective. So that’s going to be quite helpful to us.  I think also it helps, with a two-week event like this, us not get backed up and be able to continue to feed specifically the primary TV hours on ESPN, ESPN-2.  It’s certainly going to take a variable, although there will be other variables with other courts, it will take one big variable out for us from a programming perspective, which we’re looking forward to that.

    REYNOLDS: I think from a production side of the house, there’s a duality, there’s a double-edged sword here.  We love the opportunity to have those rain delays occasionally because it gave a 14-deep roster group of talent to jump on camera and get into our whip-around, talk through tennis news, updates, spark the daily debate, so to speak, and not miss any action until the rain delay came to a conclusion. So that was a win for us.  The other side of it, if it lasted too long, gosh, we have to figure out how to come up with three hours of fill. In this live world that we all live in and exist in right now, live social currency, it’s tough to go back and replay a match.

    We on the production side are challenged with saying, Oh, my gosh, we actually have content happening all the time guaranteed over the 130, 140-plus hours we do. We have to figure out how and when are we going to traffic a John McEnroe, Chrissie Evert, Pam Shriver, Mary Joe Fernandez debate, and figure out how we’re going to get enough screen time to explore those issues and stories.

    Q. Especially in the early rounds, in situations where it’s raining, we will go from having many courts playing to one playing. There will be some delays trying not to preemptively close the roof too much. How much have you talked through about how different it will be if you find yourself in a situation in the early rounds with only one match going on at one time, and then waiting for the roof to close and them to dry off the court?
    REYNOLDS: I think production-wise, we have figured that model out through a couple of years at Wimbledon. In terms of the traffic flow on a day, organizing our playlist, list of ingredients, what we want to have in our hip pocket and ready to convey if the situation arises, we’re pretty well-structured to accommodate that.  If this venue closes faster and gets back to play faster than the 22-and-a-half minutes it takes at the All England Club, we’ll be a little challenged about how we do justice to get those stories out, have people have a chance to run through them all.

    I think also having a chance, if we just get dedicated to a single match on an afternoon, that’s our playlist middle of the week, I think it actually gives us a chance to both dig into who those two folks are, but also still talk a little bit more broadly.  We’ll have announce teams around the grounds ready to go and weigh in on that single match, as well as get into a dialogue about what’s still available and what’s going on in the tennis community. I don’t know that we’re going to miss a beat in that situation.

    Q. Is there any fatigue from the Olympics? Is there an Olympic fatigue that you’re worried about? There’s been just a lot of tennis in general going into this international competition, the US Open.
    GUGLIELMINO: I’ll take the programming angle to that.  I think we’re not overly concerned with that. The US Open is obviously a marquee, world-class event. It is an annual fixture. Even though the Olympics did feature some tennis, we certainly believe that the US Open is distinct enough.

    I think certainly our coverage – Jamie alluded to it earlier with the roster of talent we have, the various platforms that will be on – we think it’s a unique story, unique event, what I call a short story over two weeks where it’s going to have its own storylines that develop. Jamie and his team are going to be there to tell that story and to bring it home to fans.  So from a programming perspective, we’re not concerned.

    REYNOLDS: I would say also, you put this event in New York, it’s still sports theater. Rio, the Olympics, the DelPo-Murray match was extraordinary and terrific theater in that realm. Just the character and the tone of what you get out of New York City in prime time is a very different feel. I think that’s the hallmark of this event, the interactivity of the fans, the crowds, the texture of the celebrities that come through, an event that goes on well past 11:00 or midnight, that’s pretty good. It just has its own identity. I think you carry that momentum.  I don’t know if there’s saturation of tennis. I still look at 12 nights, prime time windows, as that opportunity to feature great competition night after night.

    GUGLIELMINO: I love the notion of identity, Jamie. That’s a good point.

    Q. I was there last week and looked at the new grandstand. Can you talk about your coverage for the new grandstand. Will you have a commentary booth like you had at the old one? What is it like to shoot the new grandstand? And talking about Ashe, they’re planning to do the new Louis Armstrong in 2018. Do you work with the USTA in advance as far as technologically the things you might need for the new Armstrong? Do you have any input?
    REYNOLDS: On the first question, on the new grandstand, I’ll meet you for lunch on Monday and we’ll go and take a look at it the first time.  No, we have been a part of that process, what the grandstand will look like and feel like for the teams that will work up there. It’s great.  A little bit what comes to mind is like the bullring at Roland Garros. It has that larger, theatrical feel. It’s dynamic. It’s a terrific, terrific looking stage, performance stage, for tennis. It’s going to be exciting in there.  We do, indeed, have our announce teams over there, which is terrific.

    Looking forward to the Armstrong construction, where they’re going on that, we do indeed. We look at ourselves a little bit like general contractors in partnership with the USTA and the tennis center specifically to really figure out how we’re going to get fiber connectivity, can we build some recessed positions for cameras in advance, can we prewire for future protected camera positions at the venue.  It’s very much based on this 10-year relationship. We’re side-by-side on this. Coming in with what we think we ought to be prepared for three years, four years, five years from now, we don’t have to go in and retrofit the venue. Like the current grandstand, it will be a future-proof project.

    Q. Jamie, I spoke to you last year when you had the CoCo Vandeweghe interview live on court. Can we expect more live on-court interviews?
    REYNOLDS: It’s a fascinating follow-up. I think we all learned a lot through that exercise last year. It was a wake-up call for all of us, broadcaster, media, as well as the four majors, the ATP, the WTA, ITF, to kind of get their heads together and say, Let’s get this gang of seven, the folks that will steer the future of this sport, come together and start figuring out what can we do to offer more value from our performances, from our competitions, for the fan base.  It’s been a really good year in terms of opening that dialogue, kind of getting everybody in phase with one another to figure out how we’re going to grow the sport and stay current with other competitions, other sport categories around the globe.

    What happens at the US Open specifically, we’ve all come to the consensus that this is good for the sport, but we have to be aligned in how we do it at all the events.  There’s been a lot of conversations behind the scenes, so to speak, with all of those rights holders, trying to get our respective compasses oriented in the right direction. Those meetings will continue to take shape, as they have at the other majors. We’re going to continue to keep pushing the envelope with everyone.

    Right now to your specific question, are there plans to do it right now, I don’t know that I can commit to that answer yet.

    Q. Given how the digital viewing for the Olympics have hurt ratings for Rio, are you concerned at all with a similar impact for the Open?
    GUGLIELMINO: Well, let’s put it this way. From an ESPN perspective for the US Open, our view is and always has been that it is something that’s complementary to the overall audience. I certainly don’t expect, especially coming off of the year we had last year – ratings up on television as well as digital – I don’t expect a scenario whereby the digital piece is going to harm the TV numbers.

    DAVE NAGLE: Aside from the TV numbers that went up, the audience grew and got younger. The Watch number, it was four times than what we did the year before, and it was the most-watched tennis tournament ever at the time on WatchESPN.

    Q. Jamie, what are we going to see in some of the cool tech toys that end up at the tennis center for you guys? Specifically, are you bringing back, or is the USTA bringing back the freeD 360 replay system?
    REYNOLDS: The way to frame this one is this is the USTA’s coming out party. If you look at their new house, you look at the National Tennis Center, what Danny Zausner, his group, the USTA have done, we’ve adopted a mindset that this is their party, this is their coming out, where it’s all about the venue this year. The debut of the roof, the outer courts, it’s pretty spectacular.  So everything from our perspective, our capturing the event, both as host broadcaster and domestic carrier, is designed to feature that, right? It’s a pretty progressive venue now. We’re kind of excited about that.

 

What did we learn last year with the hardware we brought to the dance? SpiderCam is coming back. That’s part of the host broadcast feed. That’s embedded. We’re at a point now where that ought to be not a discreet asset but a shared asset for the world. Same thing with RailCam on Ashe. We kept that installed on the south wall.

Hoist, we have the same 70-foot crane that’s coming back. Rather than being on a footprint, we actually have it go onto the park’s ground just outside the venue shooting back. That’s on the southwest corner shooting back into the venue. It features a prominent presentation of the new grandstand stadium in that southwest corner of the venue. That’s kind of cool.

We’re embellishing the roster of toys, the Steadicams and (indiscernible) cameras that we’ll have around the grounds to be able to move around, take advantage, display as much of what this tennis facility has to offer. That’s kind of cool.

On the replay technology, the freeD group, we know they were sold to Intel. That deal ESPN did last year. We’ve committed to a three-year package with them. They’re in their second year of three with us. That 360 technology will a stay as a discreet asset for ESPN.

Q. The two new TV courts, does it change anything for you? How much have things evolved in terms of ESPN3, the streaming product growing exponentially over the years? Now with two more new TV courts, how much is that a factor beyond the linear from a production and operation standpoint?
GUGLIELMINO: From our perspective, obviously we’re looking to provide end-to-end coverage. With all the simultaneous courts happening, two things are striking. The first one is being able to provide live full coverage of another court. For consumers that want to get locked on to that court that perhaps isn’t on ESPN-1 or 2, there’s that aspect to it.

The other piece for Jamie, it’s in his world, that’s another court he can go to and we’re getting a feed from, which again it adds the complementary piece to the television side, but it also adds to the comprehensive coverage and the ability to kind of go to that court beyond just serving it up as a linear offering, if you will, to a fan that wants to park on it.

REYNOLDS: It’s a safe bet that as we get deeper, we were at 11 courts last year, up to 12 this year, the outer years we’ve made a commitment to continue to increase, at some point to get as many courts as possible off the venue and have them available for not just ESPN or E3, our clients, but also for the world. It’s valuable for the USTA to be able to market them internationally if they have the opportunity for a discreet feed. In the global expansion of the event, it’s attractive.

Our strategy right now is to continue to deliver to what we refer to as that seven linear feed style of cutting. It’s a traditional control room with a variety of camera complements. Seven linear courts is the standard operating procedure of production.

The outer courts that were four last year, five this year, where we feature the Hawk-Eye, TV robotics, is a good solution where we can guarantee multi-camera coverage but do it on a scale that is commensurate with action on those courts.

NAGLE: I think it’s safe to say at ESPN we don’t believe much in self-cannibalization, otherwise we never would have launched ESPN2 and everything that followed.

Q. A question about the press room cameras, for the press conferences. Can you go into that? It’s related to the on-court interviews.
REYNOLDS: I think we’ve realized the value. Certainly as a 24-hour network, we thrive on live content. What we’ve learned at a variety of other events is the more that we can take advantage of either a second screen opportunity, more value that can continue to enhance and broaden the experience of the event, the more valuable it is to the rights holder and the more valuable it is for us to service the fan in that live moment.

We went to the USTA a year ago with a concept that rather than just having a single or multi-camera coverage of the press room, letting the broadcasters record sound or go to that feed live when it was appropriate, what if we create a service that’s a multi-camera switched feed that now is a live signal that starts at 11:00 a.m. and runs till the last presser at the end of each day.

In that interactivity, our goal is to enhance the exchange press corps, as well as whoever is in the press room at the time. In a multi-camera coverage, we will have robotic cameras trained both on the press corps or those in the press room at the time, as well as the principals speaking up at the rostrum.  Our goal in that interactivity is to capture that dynamic, the enhancement of what folks find interesting to hear the firsthand account, both the questions, answers, responses, back and forth, get that dialogue, and offer it as a continuous service.  I think from the digital standpoint from ESPN, if that’s constantly on, that’s great. If we elect to go to a presser at the time live-live, it’s another delivery mechanism for that content.

Q. When you say ‘continuous service’ you mean for your feeds or publicly?
REYNOLDS: Both. For the ESPN audience, on the E3 channel, watch it on your desktop, wait for all the pressers to come through all day long, you’re welcome to do it. On the linear screen, watch what we’re doing with match coverage.

Q. Jamie, I saw you when they did the roof opening ceremony. They had a little bit of a glitch trying to reopen it after they closed it. Did you have any glitches last year during the tournament? Is there anything that the US Open presents as far as the heat, the shade, the wind, anything like that that makes it more challenging or different from the other majors?
REYNOLDS:  What did we learn last year? I think we learned last year what a hit replay technologies, freeD, 360 system, in that arena works very well. How it’s going to behave and react or act in a new lighting scheme, we’re hoping to get that tested out tonight and over the next couple of nights to make sure we can optimize that at nighttime. That will be interesting.

I think the shadowing will now be a new ingredient. While it’s a wide opening, you’re going to have angular lines crisscrossing the court now as the sun traverses across the sky, right? It’s going to look a little bit more like Australia than the rounded edges and sight lines that we’ve historically seen there. It’s going to feel different in different lighting during the course of the day.

The wind swirl, what actually happens, I think it’s going to be neutralized somewhat now because you don’t have the bowl effect that we’ve had with an open top before. That will change for the players as well as the fan base, what it actually swirls and feels like down at the bottom.

The last ingredient that I think was still an incredibly invaluable untapped resource is the access they’ve allowed us along the practice courts. I think being able to handle 8 to 10 hours a day from that practice court position has been an incredibly rich, coordinated effort that helps the fans feel connected to the event. Not just observers anymore; you’re actually in the moment. I think our goal is to try to enhance that experience from noon to 7:00, when the prime time window starts.

Q. Trump got quite a reaction there last year, people were all over him. When someone like that comes, do you know in advance? If Trump or Clinton came, can you get to someone like that?
REYNOLDS: It’s a coordinated effort. The USTA handles their guest list, their attendees. They have a group that marshals that and handles that. They make us aware of who may be in the house, what the plans are, whether they’re open to being a part of the telecast or whether they prefer to just come out and enjoy the tennis and that’s their night off.  It’s a dynamic dialogue that takes place on a daily basis. We typically know 24 hours in advance.

 

Related article:

Jamie Reynolds of ESPN on Approach Shots

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