June 25, 2016

2016 Wimbledon Gentlemen’s First Round Head-to-Heads

2016 Wimbledon Gentlemen’s First Round Head-to-Heads (Without Qualifiers)

Singles Head to Head
Career
(Only tour-level main draw matches are counted in head-to-head totals.)
Novak DJOKOVIC v James WARD
NO MATCHES PLAYED

Kyle EDMUND v Adrian MANNARINO
NO MATCHES PLAYED

Lukas ROSOL v Sam QUERREY
NO MATCHES PLAYED

Philipp KOHLSCHREIBER v Pierre-Hugues HERBERT
Philipp KOHLSCHREIBER LEADS 2 : 0
2014 Halle Grass (O) R16 Philipp KOHLSCHREIBER 6-2 6-4
2016 Stuttgart Outdoor Grass (O) R32 Philipp KOHLSCHREIBER 6-4 6-1

Damir DZUMHUR v Denis KUDLA
TIED 0 : 0
2014 Miami Qualifying Draw Hard (O) R64 Damir DZUMHUR 6-3 6-4

Brydan KLEIN v Nicolas MAHUT
NO MATCHES PLAYED

Dudi SELA v David FERRER
David FERRER LEADS 2 : 1
2008 Beijing Hard (O) R16 Dudi SELA 6-3 6-3
2009 Johannesburg Hard (O) R32 David FERRER 6-2 6-0
2016 ‘s-Hertogenbosch Grass (O) R16 David FERRER 6-4 6-4

David GOFFIN v Alexander WARD
TIED 0 : 0
2012 Le Gosier Challenger Hard (O) R16 David GOFFIN 6-2 3-6 7-6(4)

Nicolas ALMAGRO v Rogerio DUTRA SILVA
NO MATCHES PLAYED

Denis ISTOMIN v Kevin ANDERSON
Kevin ANDERSON LEADS 2 : 0
2013 Sydney Hard (O) QF Kevin ANDERSON 6-4 6-3
2013 Atlanta Hard (O) QF Kevin ANDERSON 6-3 3-6 6-3

Jack SOCK v Ernests GULBIS
NO MATCHES PLAYED

Diego SCHWARTZMAN v Robin HAASE
Robin HAASE LEADS 2 : 0
2013 Hamburg Clay (O) R64 Robin HAASE 7-6(3) 4-6 7-5
2016 Indian Wells Hard (O) R128 Robin HAASE 6-3 6-4

Andreas SEPPI v Guillermo GARCIA-LOPEZ
Andreas SEPPI LEADS 4 : 1
2007 Monte Carlo Qualifying Draw Clay (O) R16 Andreas SEPPI 6-3 6-3
2008 U.S. Open Hard (O) R64 Andreas SEPPI 6-2 4-6 6-2 6-2
2009 Miami Hard (O) R128 Andreas SEPPI 7-6(6) 6-1
2009 French Open Clay (O) R128 Andreas SEPPI 6-3 6-3 6-1
2012 Doha Hard (O) R16 Andreas SEPPI 7-5 6-3
2015 Zagreb Hard (I) FR Guillermo GARCIA-LOPEZ 7-6(4) 6-3

Pablo CARRENO BUSTA v Milos RAONIC
NO MATCHES PLAYED

Roger FEDERER v Guido PELLA
NO MATCHES PLAYED

Daniel EVANS v Jan-Lennard STRUFF
NO MATCHES PLAYED

Evgeny DONSKOY v Alexandr DOLGOPOLOV
Alexandr DOLGOPOLOV LEADS 1 : 0
2009 Astana Challenger Hard (I) R32 Evgeny DONSKOY 6-2 7-6(5)
2016 Barcelona Clay (O) R32 Alexandr DOLGOPOLOV 4-6 7-6(9) 6-4
Gael MONFILS v Jeremy CHARDY
Gael MONFILS LEADS 1 : 0
2008 Marrakech Challenger Clay (O) FR Gael MONFILS 7-6(2) 7-6(6)
2009 U.S. Open Hard (O) R128 Gael MONFILS 6-1 6-4 6-3

Malek JAZIRI v Steve JOHNSON
TIED 0 : 0
2012 Izmir Challenger Hard (O) R16 Steve JOHNSON 6-3 5-7 6-4
2014 Dallas Challenger Hard (I) FR Steve JOHNSON 6-4 6-4

Janko TIPSAREVIC v Gilles SIMON
Gilles SIMON LEADS 8 : 2
2008 Rotterdam Hard (I) R16 Gilles SIMON 7-6(4) 7-6(4)
2011 Miami Hard (O) R16 Gilles SIMON 4-6 7-6(3) 6-2
2011 Cincinnati Hard (O) R32 Gilles SIMON 6-7(3) 6-2 6-3
2012 Monte Carlo Clay (O) R16 Gilles SIMON 6-0 4-6 6-1
2012 Madrid Clay (O) R16 Janko TIPSAREVIC 7-6(3) 5-7 6-1
2012 Bangkok Hard (O) SF Gilles SIMON 6-4 6-4
2012 Tokyo Outdoor Hard (O) R32 Janko TIPSAREVIC 4-6 6-3 6-1
2012 Valencia Hard (O) R32 Gilles SIMON 5-4 RET
2013 Miami Hard (O) R16 Gilles SIMON 5-7 6-2 6-2
2015 Bucharest Clay (O) R16 Gilles SIMON 7-5 6-4

Marin CILIC v Brian BAKER
TIED 0 : 0
2016 Wimbledon Grass (O) R128

Borna CORIC v Ivo KARLOVIC
Ivo KARLOVIC LEADS 1 : 0
2015 Bucharest Clay (O) R16 Ivo KARLOVIC 3-6 6-3 6-4

Pablo CUEVAS v Andrey KUZNETSOV
NO MATCHES PLAYED

Santiago GIRALDO v Gilles MULLER
Gilles MULLER LEADS 1 : 0
2012 ‘s-Hertogenbosch Grass (O) R32 Gilles MULLER 7-6(5) 6-7(4) 6-3

Julien BENNETEAU v Illya MARCHENKO
NO MATCHES PLAYED

Sam GROTH v Kei NISHIKORI
Kei NISHIKORI LEADS 1 : 0
2015 Washington Hard (O) QF Kei NISHIKORI 6-4 6-4

Dominic THIEM v Florian MAYER
Florian MAYER LEADS 1 : 0
2016 Halle Grass (O) SF Florian MAYER 6-3 6-4

Dmitry TURSUNOV v Joao SOUSA
Joao SOUSA LEADS 1 : 0
2013 Cincinnati Qualifying Draw Hard (O) R16 Dmitry TURSUNOV 6-1 6-4
2013 St. Petersburg Hard (I) QF Joao SOUSA 6-4 6-3

Alexander ZVEREV v Paul-Henri MATHIEU
Paul-Henri MATHIEU LEADS 1 : 0
2014 Braunschweig Challenger Clay (O) FR Alexander ZVEREV 1-6 6-1 6-4
2014 St Remy Challenger Hard (O) R32 Alexander ZVEREV 6-4 6-2
2015 Aix En Provence Challenger Clay (O) SF Paul-Henri MATHIEU 6-4 4-6 7-5
2016 Montpellier Hard (I) SF Paul-Henri MATHIEU 7-6(11) 7-5
2016 Wimbledon Grass (O) R128

Horacio ZEBALLOS v Mikhail YOUZHNY
Mikhail YOUZHNY LEADS 1 : 0
2009 Moscow Hard (I) R32 Mikhail YOUZHNY 6-1 7-6(5)

Benjamin BECKER v Facundo BAGNIS
NO MATCHES PLAYED

Ivan DODIG v Tomas BERDYCH
Tomas BERDYCH LEADS 1 : 0
2011 Chennai Hard (O) R16 Tomas BERDYCH 6-2 6-4
2016 Wimbledon Grass (O) R128

Roberto BAUTISTA AGUT v Jordan THOMPSON
NO MATCHES PLAYED

Mikhail KUKUSHKIN v Martin KLIZAN
TIED 0 : 0
2010 Furth Challenger Clay (O) R32 Mikhail KUKUSHKIN 7-6(6) 7-5

Fernando VERDASCO v Bernard TOMIC
Bernard TOMIC LEADS 4 : 1
2009 Brisbane Hard (O) R32 Fernando VERDASCO 6-4 6-2
2012 Australian Open Hard (O) R128 Bernard TOMIC 4-6 6-7(3) 6-4 6-2 7-5
2014 Stockholm Hard (I) QF Bernard TOMIC 0-6 6-4 7-6(6)
2015 Shanghai Hard (O) R64 Bernard TOMIC 6-3 7-6(3)
2016 Queen’s Grass (O) R16 Bernard TOMIC 6-7(2) 6-4 6-4

Donald YOUNG v Leonardo MAYER
TIED 1 : 1
2012 Winston-Salem Hard (O) R64 Donald YOUNG 4-6 6-3 6-2
2014 Stockholm Hard (I) R32 Leonardo MAYER 6-4 6-4

Stephane ROBERT v Juan Martin DEL POTRO
NO MATCHES PLAYED

Taylor FRITZ v Stan WAWRINKA
NO MATCHES PLAYED

Richard GASQUET v Aljaz BEDENE
NO MATCHES PLAYED

Marcel GRANOLLERS v Victor ESTRELLA BURGOS
NO MATCHES PLAYED

Vasek POSPISIL v Albert RAMOS-VINOLAS
NO MATCHES PLAYED
John ISNER v Marcos BAGHDATIS
John ISNER LEADS 6 : 0
2009 Los Angeles Hard (O) R16 John ISNER 6-3 7-6(11)
2011 Canadian Open Hard (O) R64 John ISNER 6-3 6-4
2011 Winston-Salem Hard (O) QF John ISNER 1-6 6-3 6-4
2011 U.S. Open Hard (O) R128 John ISNER 7-6(2) 7-6(11) 2-6 6-4
2013 Washington Hard (O) QF John ISNER 6-7(5) 6-4 6-4
2015 Atlanta Hard (O) FR John ISNER 6-3 6-3

Taro DANIEL v Juan MONACO
NO MATCHES PLAYED

Inigo CERVANTES HUEGUN v Jo-Wilfried TSONGA
NO MATCHES PLAYED

Nick KYRGIOS v Radek STEPANEK
Nick KYRGIOS LEADS 1 : 0
2013 French Open Clay (O) R128 Nick KYRGIOS 7-6(4) 7-6(8) 7-6(11)

Dusan LAJOVIC v Dustin BROWN
NO MATCHES PLAYED

Federico DELBONIS v Fabio FOGNINI
Fabio FOGNINI LEADS 2 : 1
2011 Madrid Qualifying Draw Clay (O) R32 Federico DELBONIS 3-6 7-6(4) 6-2
2013 Hamburg Clay (O) FR Fabio FOGNINI 4-6 7-6(8) 6-2
2015 Rio De Janeiro Clay (O) QF Fabio FOGNINI 6-4 6-7(10) 7-6(9)
2016 Buenos Aires Clay (O) R32 Federico DELBONIS 6-7(4) 6-4 6-4

Rajeev RAM v Feliciano LOPEZ
Feliciano LOPEZ LEADS 1 : 0
2010 Johannesburg Hard (O) QF Feliciano LOPEZ 7-6(2) 6-3

John MILLMAN v Albert MONTANES
NO MATCHES PLAYED

Liam BROADY v Andy MURRAY
NO MATCHES PLAYED

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Wimbledon Preview Conference Call with ESPN’s Chrissie Evert, John McEnroe

John McEnroe

John McEnroe

Wimbledon Preview Conference Call with ESPN’s Chrissie Evert, John McEnroe

 

(June 21, 2016) ESPN tennis analysts Chrissie Evert and John McEnroe spoke with media Tuesday to preview Wimbledon, which is exclusive to ESPN starting Monday, June 27.  Highlights of the call are followed by the full transcript.

 

Soundbites

On:  Are nerves the reason Serena is “stuck” on 21 Majors, one short of Graf?

  • I think it has gotten to her a little bit nerve-wise, no doubt about it. Especially against Kerber and against Muguruza, she wasn’t able to dig herself out of the hole like she has in past years, which was surprising to see that, because that’s what she is infamous for. When she’s down, she can get that next gear, that next level, play some great tennis. We didn’t see that in both those matches when she was in trouble. That tells me something is holding her back, and it could be nerves….(that said) In the last few years, she’s been good enough at 60%, 70% to win matches. Now I don’t think it’s going to win matches for her.  The competition has gotten better. They’re less intimidated by her. They have strategy when they go out against her. They’re just not intimidated. They know she’s human.” – Evert

 

On:  A quick look at the top men.

  • “Everyone is chasing Djokovic, there’s no question about it. Everybody else is trying to bridge the gap between Andy and see what else is out there. Rafa not playing, Roger has been struggling to stay healthy for the first time really. Losing to Thiem, Zverev, these guys can see light at the end of the tunnel maybe.  It’s going to be interesting this year, but clearly at the moment these guys have put themselves out here, Andy and Novak, and these other guys have to figure out ways to add to what they’ve got and to bridge this gap.” – McEnroe

On:  The Lendl-Murray Reunion.

  • I think Lendl did more for him than anybody. I think it’s a great combination because Lendl’s strengths are Murray’s weaknesses. Lendl, mentally and emotionally, he managed himself so well on the court. With Andy, that’s been sort of his downfall a little bit in the past, he’s gotten so emotional in these matches.  It was noticeably different when Lendl was coaching him. He was a bit quieter. He seemed to have himself under control a lot more.  I think it’s a great fit. I’m happy for both of them, that they’re working together. Again, that’s the best scenario for Andy Murray right now, to have him in his corner.” – Evert

On: Working with Raonic between the French Open and Wimbledon

  • He’s a great young kid, extremely professional and dedicated.  (My role is to) Try to hopefully help him a bit. I think he’s one of the contenders….. (he) has a big game, obviously got a lot of shots. One of the best serves in the history of tennis. He has a huge forehand.  I think he understands that he needs to be able to use that to his advantage, be more aggressive, take it to people.” – McEnroe
  1. I’d like to talk about Serena. Talk us through, how much do you think this chase for 22 has gotten to Serena, if at all? We saw her stall a little bit for 18 a couple years ago. I just wonder if there’s any correlation to be made, or Serena has put this to the side and trying to do what she always does, which is win the tournament?
    CHRISSIE EVERT: I think it has gotten to her a little bit nerve-wise, no doubt about it. Especially against Kerber and against Muguruza, she wasn’t able to dig herself out of the hole like she has in past years, which was surprising to see that, because that’s what she is infamous for. When she’s down, she can get that next gear, that next level, play some great tennis. We didn’t see that in both those matches when she was in trouble. That tells me something is holding her back, and it could be nerves.

    Saying that, I’ve always said, John can weigh in on this, too, after 30 years old, when you’ve been on the tour for 15, in her case maybe 20 years, you don’t have 100% on days every single match. That’s what she’s experiencing now, in the last few years. In the last few years, she’s been good enough at 60%, 70% to win matches. Now I don’t think it’s going to win matches for her.  The competition has gotten better. They’re less intimidated by her. They have strategy when they go out against her. They’re just not intimidated. They know she’s human. They’ve seen a couple bad losses, a couple nerve-struck losses. There’s a couple different ingredients.  In saying that, Wimbledon is the perfect time for her. I think the surface is tailor made for her game. Power and athleticism, John has said this, is the key to playing on grass.  If she can just focus with each match, her game, she can just play it out, and her game is still the best on grass as any of the other women right now.
    JOHN McENROE: The only thing I would add is obviously for quite a few years it’s been hers to win or lose. Going for the slam, obviously it’s done so rarely, the pressure is amped up that much more. She was trying to tie Steffi. When she lost at the Open, there was a big letdown. She didn’t play much at all. I don’t think she played for three, four months.  She almost pulled out of the Australian. I was extremely surprised, as well as most people, that she lost that. Not as surprised at the French, the way Muguruza was playing.  It’s not easy to try to do what she’s doing, to make history at this stage. Knowing that motivation is an issue at times between the majors has made it a little trickier probably.  There’s not that many people that wouldn’t pick her here. So it is a surface, if she’s playing well, she’ll win the tournament. But I think, as Chrissie said, there’s more days when you’re not playing that well, and that’s where she can get in trouble.

    Q. CoCo Vandeweghe has been playing pretty well on the grass. She reached the quarterfinals last year. Chrissie, how do you see her doing this year? Do you see her reaching the second week and possibly going further than her quarterfinals last year? On the men’s side, for John, del Potro is back after a two-year absence. After seeing him play a couple matches this year, how do you expect him to do at Wimbledon?
    CHRISSIE EVERT: Well, we’re seeing some of her best tennis. Again, I have to say that a lot of it’s because of the surface, grass. As I said before, athleticism and power have a lot to do with her success.  Again, her game is tailor made for the grass also. She doesn’t like the clay. She doesn’t have a lot of patience. She doesn’t like to move a lot. I think the grass accentuates the strengths in her game, which are the big first serve and the fact she can volley. She likes to come into the net and volley.  Craig Kardon I think has done a great job with her.

    You know, it depends on the draw really. It really depends on the draw. When you say, Can anybody make the second week? The draw, the weather conditions…  She’s capable very much. I think the last few tournaments will give her confidence. But, you know, she’s still building I think on the emotional and the mental part of the game, not getting down on herself. She’s such a perfectionist, I think that area can still improve.  Again, this surface is easier on her, shorter rallies, she doesn’t have to stay out there and be patient. She can hit that winner on the third or fourth shot. It just depends on if it’s working that day, she can beat almost anyone. But we’ve seen her with a slew of errors, too.  She’s still an unpredictable player. If she’s going to have any success, it’s going to be on the grass.
    JOHN McENROE: I like Juan a lot, but I’m believing he’s not totally sure of himself with his wrist. I talked to him recently. He says he’s getting better. Hopefully he is. I’m taking his word for it. The guy was 5 in the world at one stage. He battled back to the top 10. He can obviously still play.  He’s got to be able to not just slice his backhand. Obviously even at Queen’s and the week before, I forgot where he was the week before that, Stuttgart or something, he does predominantly do that. So it’s sort of a work in progress.  I think hopefully he’ll get healthy. That’s what it boils down to. He still has got game. He’s had a rough patch. I hope he gets it together. He’s on a protected ranking. He has some opportunities. He’s protected ranking 7, but he doesn’t get seeded. That means he could play anyone in the draw, which wouldn’t be the best thing for some of the top players, but it’s not the best for him either to try to get back to where he sort of deserves to be if he can stay healthy.
    Q. How did he seem to you when you spoke to him?
    JOHN McENROE: He’s obviously been extremely frustrated and upset. He’s been out of the game way too long. He was at 5 in the world, got hurt, then he battled back to the top 10. I think he was 6 or 7 when he got hurt again. 7, that’s his protected ranking. It’s a shame, in a way.  So, you know, I’m reading between the lines. I’m sure he’s still scared, a little worried. I don’t know. He’s tried all different types of surgeries and things. I didn’t get into the exact specifics.  Just as someone who hates to see someone lose a career over getting hurt, it’s sort of unfair when you see good guys get burned by injury. If he does get healthy, I don’t know if he’ll get all the way back to 5 in the world, but he can still do some damage.

    Q. Serena, in the last three slams, she’s lost to first-time slam winners. I wanted to sort of revisit, Chrissie, what you were saying before that to the rest of the field maybe she doesn’t seem invincible anymore. Players are beating her in big matches, and they’re players who have not won a slam before. I also wanted to ask about Andy Murray. He’s right there at all these slams. He won three years ago. How do you see his chance against Novak, if it were to come down to those two?
    CHRISSIE EVERT: As far as Serena, I’ll reiterate, from my observations when I’m calling her matches, I’m seeing these finals, again, it’s twofold. What I’m seeing is the fact that she hasn’t been able to, the last three Grand Slams, get herself into that next gear when she’s in trouble. This is what she’s been famous for in her whole career, especially last year when she was in like, what, nine three-set matches in Grand Slams. It was just incredible to me to see her down a set and a break against an Azarenka, down a set against Safarova, Bacsinszky, and come back. She was able to find that gear and that level. We haven’t seen that.

    But the other thing, maybe even more important than what we’re seeing now, is the belief we’re seeing from other players. That’s what Kerber talked about, that’s what Muguruza talked about. They are starting to believe they can beat Serena. We’ve never seen that in Serena’s career when she’s been dominant. There’s always been a little bit of resistance or a little bit of doubt, and they haven’t been able to play their game aggressively on the big points in the third set, and Serena has been able to.  It’s twofold: it’s Serena and it’s the field having that belief. Again, Kerber, Muguruza have talked about that belief. I think more and more players are finding that belief as Serena loses more and more, she becomes less and less untouchable.  In saying that, it sounds like a negative for Serena. But for her to even be in this position is historical. I believe, along I’m sure with John and other champions, that she still can get that one, which would tie her with Steffi. To me, this is her best shot.

    One thing I didn’t bring up is she did have a big week with Mackie Shilstone last week in Palm Beach. She did go over a lot of fitness. She hasn’t had Mackie really on her team until I believe last year, in the summer of last year. Hopefully that was a green flag saying, I want to go that extra mile, get in better shape for Wimbledon, come visit me. He did work with her. In saying that, that’s a good sign for her.

    Q. John, if you want to talk about Murray?
    JOHN McENROE: I got a firsthand look because I’ve been working with Milos. He was playing great. Andy stepped it up. Like Milos is trying to do with him, he’s trying to do with Novak, bridge that gap a little bit, try to figure out what little bit extra he can do. He’s obviously put himself in position numerous times.

    Novak went into the zone at the French. Andy was playing the best tennis of his life on clay for sure at the French and won the first set, looked great. In ways he’s getting closer. I do think his best chance, if you were to say in terms of surface, I think he’s best suited, just having the crowd more on his side here at Wimbledon. So I think his best chance, not that he can’t beat him at the Open, he beat him in Rome not long ago, but his record has recently not been good.  Novak has handled it tremendously, what he’s been able to do, like Serena. He’s won four in a row. He’s trying to do something that only one or two other people have done. He’s unbelievably consistent and prepared.  I think him adding Ivan, he’s trying to get that little bit extra, just like other players are trying to do the same. We’ll see how it all plays out.  Murray is playing great. He’s a great player, there’s no question about it. But at the moment there’s no question that the level that Novak is at is something that you rarely, if ever, see, that consistency. He’s impenetrable in a way. He’s able to play good offense. It’s a tall order for anyone.
    CHRISSIE EVERT: With Lendl back on the team, I think that’s all a positive. I think that’s going to give also him maybe a little bit more excitement. I think Ivan was so good for him mentally and emotionally more than anything. We maybe have seen a little bit more focus. I just think that’s going to be great.  I agree with John. With him playing at Wimbledon, his home crowd, him playing some of the best tennis of his life, playing more aggressively, and with Lendl back, I think it’s all looking good. It’s about as good as it’s going to get, let’s put it that way. If that’s good enough to win the tournament, so be it. But is that enough? That’s the big question. Djokovic is just playing so great.

    Q. John, sticking with Lendl, what are your thoughts on Murray’s reappointment of him? Do you think he can add that missing ingredient to that rivalry with Djokovic? How much would you enjoy a reunion with him at Wimbledon?
    JOHN McENROE: I just saw him the other day. Milos had a great shot at a set and 3-Love, playing really well. You have to credit him. He seized an opportunity and stepped up. That’s what great players do.  As Milos is trying to do, not just him but others, leave no stone unturned, try to maximize what they have. To me it’s not surprising. It’s not a no-brainer. But I think the fact that his best success was with Ivan, it makes sense to give this another shot given the circumstances.  It doesn’t surprise me. I think it makes people think if you get in someone’s head in any way, whether that can make a difference, whether he makes a difference. We all hope he can make any difference. He’s done an excellent job in the past.

    Everyone is chasing Djokovic, there’s no question about it. Everybody else is trying to bridge the gap between Andy and see what else is out there. Rafa not playing, Roger has been struggling to stay healthy for the first time really. Losing to Thiem, Zverev, these guys can see light at the end of the tunnel maybe.  It’s going to be interesting this year, but clearly at the moment these guys have put themselves out here, Andy and Novak, and these other guys have to figure out ways to add to what they’ve got and to bridge this gap.

    Q. Chrissie, we saw today that Mouratoglou thought it was strange that Murray hired Mauresmo. Do you think we’ll see a top player hire a female coach in the future?
    CHRISSIE EVERT: Who said that? I didn’t hear the first part of that.
    Q. Patrick Mouratoglou said it was strange for Murray to hire a woman as a coach.
    CHRISSIE EVERT: Wow!
    Q. He said it’s strange because they don’t know the men’s game as well as the women’s game.
    CHRISSIE EVERT: Yeah, I disagree with that. Billie Jean was a coach. I think she coached Todd Martin. Both of those players are serve and volleyers, played an aggressive game. I’m sure Mauresmo did a lot of homework. That’s kind of a little bit of a sexist statement.

    In saying that, I think Lendl did more for him than anybody. I think it’s a great combination because Lendl’s strengths are Murray’s weaknesses. Lendl, mentally and emotionally, he managed himself so well on the court. With Andy, that’s been sort of his downfall a little bit in the past, he’s gotten so emotional in these matches.  It was noticeably different when Lendl was coaching him. He was a bit quieter. He seemed to have himself under control a lot more.  I think it’s a great fit. I’m happy for both of them, that they’re working together. Again, that’s the best scenario for Andy Murray right now, to have him in his corner.

    Q. Every now and again there’s the subject of whether the men should go back and maybe play best-of-three sets in the early rounds at Grand Slams. John, I don’t know if you remember, but when you first started playing the US Open in ’77 onwards, the first rounds were played over three sets.
    JOHN McENROE: My memory is not that bad (laughter).
    Q. You’re one of the few that can remember it. Can you remember what the reason was behind it, what you thought of it, and what you think of the principle in general?
    JOHN McENROE: Well, the principle in general to me is that the players are so well-prepared, a lot of them, but especially the top players, with their teams, et cetera, I believe they’re more difficult because there’s such a premium on fitness.  Why don’t you see teenagers win? The breakthrough is harder physically and mentally. You don’t see the success as early. You have to sort of work your way up to that astronomical level of fitness in a way.  These guys to me prefer, even though there’s a stress obviously to playing best-of-five, especially if there’s delays, rain, if you had to do it a couple days in a row, they’re much more difficult to beat in best-of-five than best-of-three.  I would guess that the top players would shy against that, even though I think there’s an argument for it. We used to have 16 seeds and they did it. 32 seeds, you could think to yourself, I’m better than the 33rd player on. So you should be able to handle those people as well.  I think tennis should always think of ways to improve itself. I don’t think the door should be closed on saying that women would never play best-of-five or guys will never play best-of-three. I think it’s something that’s an ongoing discussion.

    I played tennis. Chrissie played for many years. Now we’re doing commentary. You sort of see it from both sides. You can see where the length of the match can be a problem because people’s attention span is much less than what it used to be. I’ve always wondered why at the very least there’s not tiebreakers in the fifth set in majors so there’s at least light at the end of the tunnel for the fans watching on TV or there, or the players.  But these are issues that need to be constantly addressed. The door shouldn’t be closed on that.  If I was coaching Djokovic, and I’m coaching Milos, part of his team right now, I’m not so sure I’d want them to switch it to best-of-three because I think the top guys are tougher to beat, like I said. These guys are extremely well-prepared.

    Q. Can you remember why they tried it in the first place?
    JOHN McENROE: It’s not going to change anytime soon.  I don’t remember why because even I, who was not known for my incredible fitness, I would like to think I was a reasonably fit person, but not quite as fit as these guys, I think it’s a little bit more of a roll of the dice. I did lose in the Round of 16 in the US Open in 1977, my first Open, 6-2, 6-3. It seemed like it happened too fast.  I don’t remember why it was changed other than perhaps the top players decided it would lessen their chances of a loss.

    Q. Do you think Novak Djokovic’s recent accomplishments have not been appreciated the way they should be, not getting as much press as a Roger Federer or somebody else, winning four in a row?
    JOHN McENROE: He’s a better player than I was, but I had a little bit of this because I was trying to break in with Connors and Borg, the top two guys. It was frustrating at times where you felt like people would gravitate or be behind these guys, and you were trying to get that same respect, not only from the players, but the press and fans.  Jimmy brought a lot to the table with his effort, Bjorn had this great aura and look. Roger is the most beautiful player I’ve ever watched. He’s like Baryshnikov. Rafa plays like an updated 21st century Connors, with that intensity, that point is the last point they are ever going to play.  I think people are starting to respect him more and more, to see the astronomical level of consistency he’s had, incredible success week in and week out. At the majors, if you look at his records, he’s approaching Roger’s records, which would seem insurmountable. 20 straight quarters, so many semis in a row. It’s amazing.  People are starting to understand and appreciate him more. He certainly had some of that. Also our sport is bigger where I am now in Europe than it is in the States. Obviously if we had more Americans like we used to with Chrissie and Connors, myself, other people, Pete and Andre, you go down the list, it would be helpful to the interests of our sport obviously if we had Americans.

    We have Serena in the women, but we don’t have that person in the men right now. That’s also an issue. That’s another part of the reason why I think he’s not appreciated as much as he could be.
    CHRISSIE EVERT: I think that Djokovic, like John said, came along in an era where you have two of the most beloved players, two of the most exciting players with a lot of flair in Nadal and in Federer. Nadal and Federer are so different, they had so many classic matches, I think there’s just an aura around their rivalry.  Then Novak came in, no drama, not a lot of flair, just the most dependable and most consistent and efficient player there was. As we see now, this guy quietly could just beat everybody as far as Grand Slam wins. He could just be the greatest of all time if he continues to go at the speed that he’s going.  He’s doing it in a quiet way. Again, there’s no controversy. There’s no drama. You always had that with Federer and with Nadal.  Then you look at Andy Murray. Andy kind of gets lost in the shuffle also because Andy is in an era with three of the greatest players of all time. Andy himself, if he was in any other era, he probably could have been ranked No. 1.  It’s a really exciting time I think for men’s tennis.

    Q. Chrissie, do you see something in Muguruza that could potentially separate her from the pack, where she could become the primary rival for Serena?
    CHRISSIE EVERT: Sure. I mean, I don’t think you say no. I mean, who is going to be next, the next No. 1 player, after Serena is gone? You’ve got to put your money on Muguruza because first of all, you have to have power in today’s game. When I look at the next three, I look at Radwanska, Kerber and Halep. I don’t think either of those three are going to end up No. 1 in the world. They don’t have that sort of overwhelming power. Muguruza does have it, very much like Serena, following in her footsteps.  Muguruza, she still has to mature a little bit. She’s still young. She still has to get probably a little more consistent with her results in the smaller tournaments. But when I look at winning Grand Slams, you’d have to say Muguruza, you’d have to look at Madison Keys, Azarenka, Kvitova, the power players more now more so than the consistent counter-punchers.  Yeah, she’s come a long way. I think she’s going to have a tough Wimbledon. It’s very hard to carry that momentum. Very few people have won the French and Wimbledon back to back, especially at that young of an age. That will be a real curiosity for me if she can carry that momentum and confidence and do well, think about last year reaching the finals, or is she going to have a hard time resetting, especially in dealing with people’s expectations.

    Q. John, you had that Wimbledon run late in your career when you lost to Agassi. Could you relate that to Roger Federer now? What do you see for Federer at this Wimbledon and beyond? Also the movie about you, did you have any input into that, and did you have any thought about the casting for you? And Chrissie, what about Madison Keys and Sloane? What do you expect from them from this tournament and on? What are they capable of achieving here and the rest of this year?
    JOHN McENROE: As far as the movie goes, at this particular point, I’ve had no input. I know they’ve reached out to both my and Bjorn’s agents. Had absolutely no involvement whatsoever in the casting. That’s simple facts. I’ve obviously heard of him, he seems a bit crazy, which may be a good thing. He’s done some good stuff, but I’m not that familiar with him as far as his whole career. That remains to be seen. You never know what could or could not happen.

    As far as your boy Roger Federer, I don’t know. I saw him play the last two events on TV. Clearly he’s trying to position himself here. His best shot, if he’s ever going to do it, would be here. Most people feel that way. Maybe Roger does at this point.  I don’t know exactly where he’s at physically. I mean, to me I think he has a far better chance than I did at that time, I would say, because he’s putting more into it, he’s leaving no stone unturned. He has people around him more so than I did. So I would say from that standpoint, if he were able to, with a little bit of luck, he could go a long way because he’s so comfortable on this surface.  I don’t know exactly his fitness. He’s been struggling to be on a court. In the best-of-five, that’s a different story. He hasn’t played a best-of-five set match for a while. That’s another issue. Other factors will come into it, like the draw, who he plays. All these things come into it.  It’s a little unpredictable. But after the string he had of 65 straight, missing the French, I think you start to say, Okay, how much longer are you going to see Roger around? You have to appreciate each time you see him at a major. He is going to be 35 in August, I believe.
    CHRISSIE EVERT: As far as Madison and Sloane, they definitely are the most talented young Americans that we have. If I take one at a time…Sloane has disappointed us. Our expectations have been higher of Sloane. I think she’s disappointed us in her attitude, if anything. She seems like in the past she hasn’t been as engaged in her matches. She’s received criticism from that.  Tremendous talent. She can do everything. I just think it’s a matter of her putting herself on the line. If she can put herself out there and play aggressively like she knows how to play from the first shot, I think she’s a totally different player. She just in the past has been waiting and kind of assessing her opponent, kind of playing counter-punch tennis. That’s not her game. Her strength is from the first shot stepping in and playing aggressively. If she can do that, she’s hungry to win, she wants to commit herself, I think she definitely could be a top contender.  By the way, she looks better. She’s getting better and better. But maybe she’s going at her own pace. Maybe we’re all trying to rush her.

 

I know we all tried to rush Madison Keys. I’ve known Madison since she was 10 years old. Now I’ve come to the conclusion that in her own time she will win a Grand Slam, but it has to be on her terms. She has to make all the decisions.  I think we’ve seen some signs from her winning Birmingham. We saw it last year when she won Eastbourne. This girl can play on grass. This girl, again, her serve I think matches Serena’s. I think it’s the only serve out there that matches Serena’s as far as power and being a threat, being unreturnable. I’ve always had a lot of confidence in Madison.  I think in her own time, the physical has always been advanced for her, her game, her power. Once the mental and emotional catch up, which I see signs of right now, I think she’s going to win some majors. I don’t have any doubt in my mind.

Q. John, I wondered how much you enjoyed your week at Queen’s and if it’s given you extra appetite for doing more the rest of the year and further ahead? Chrissie, doing a series on great shots of the game, Serena’s serve is obviously very big. Is there anything you could sort of add to that that’s not obvious to the layperson that goes into the production of it?
CHRISSIE EVERT: How was your week, John?
JOHN McENROE: My week was nice. Thank you for asking (laughter).

Actually, I stayed in Europe and went straight over to London from Paris. It was good to sort of spend a week, get a feel for what makes Milos tick. He’s a great young kid, extremely professional and dedicated. (My role is to) Try to hopefully help him a bit. I think he’s one of the contenders. If you told me four months ago there would be six, seven people that could possibly win this, there’s a lot of guys that can beat guys on a given day, but to actually win it, I would put him in the handful of half dozen guys. I think it’s nice from that standpoint to be part of his team.

As far as down the road, I think it always was for me hopefully something that wasn’t going to be for a couple weeks then, “Thank you very much.” Hopefully for him, and it ultimately is up to him, that he’ll be a better player in a year or two years than he is at this moment, even though I think he has a shot at winning it this year.  Obviously from 25 to 29, the next three, four years, I think it’s an opportunity for him to improve. I think he wants to do that. It’s great when you see someone that’s really working hard at maximizing what he’s got.  He’s had a good team around him before. Carlos Moya has done a real fine job when he’s been there. He has other people. Ricardo Piatti has been coaching him as more of a regular thing. I think it would be part of something where I pick and choose. The beauty that’s happened for me the last five years or so with some of the other players like Boris, Ivan was doing it more often, I don’t know how many weeks he’s going to do with Andy now, but if I use the word ‘part-time’, somewhere 10 weeks or less, that’s something that is much more in my wheelhouse, and perhaps it’s for Milos as well because he already has a good team around him.  This is the type of thing where it first started to feel like, Okay, if something nice came along, it’s good. It’s not a 30- or 40-week commitment like a lot of players have with a lot of their coaches.
CHRISSIE EVERT: About John and Raonic, very much like Lendl and Murray, I think Lendl’s philosophy and his strengths really helped Murray. When I look at John’s game, it’s like opposites attract. I think John has so many rare insights into playing grass court tennis, because he played so well.  I think John was known for his touch and his quickness around the court, coming into the net. If John can influence Raonic on any of these things, I think it would be a plus-plus with Milos. When you got with him, I liked it, I liked that combination right away. You can light a fire under him because you are a feisty player.  He’s very much in control out there. Like you said, he’s professional, he’s hard-working. But he needs a little fire and he needs to show. I think just a few little tweaks in his game would make all the difference in the world in him winning Wimbledon. I’m a big fan of that combination.

I’m not kissing your ass either, John.
JOHN McENROE: I appreciate that. Thank you.
CHRISSIE EVERT: I think Serena loads up really well from her leg strength. She uses her leg strength. She loads up well. She springs up, and that just gives her much more acceleration. That plus the racquet head speed is what gives her the power. So it’s that leg strength that probably we don’t talk about as much.  And the toss, it’s always in the same slot. She very rarely has a bad toss. It’s in that same slot where she can go wide or down the T, it’s unreadable.

Q. John, Milos came to the net very well in the beginning of the year at Australia, but there seemed to be differences at Queen’s with the forehand volley. Have you worked on the technical side with him in recent weeks, and if so, could you give some specifics, what your assessment was of him during the matches in Queen’s. And also, you don’t strike me as the kind of guy that is going to have a lot of fun sitting in the chair for three sets or even five. I was wondering how you were handling not having any ability to affect what’s going on on the court as opposed to sitting in the booth where you don’t necessarily have a vested interest in the outcome?
JOHN McENROE: I’m not the guy that can sit still very well in any situation. Certainly when you obviously have lost control, you try to add what you can, try to be helpful to someone before. I’d like to maybe do a lot of standing up than sitting down. Gets your body too stiff from sitting. I’m an energy person. I kind of hope that he can feed off some of my energy and intensity a little bit because that’s the way I am and that’s the way I’m going to be.  Ivan sat there for years and didn’t change his expression. It is certainly a more helpless position, and it’s easy to be the backseat driver: You should have done this, this is how you should do that. You have to be cognizant, or the fact I played for so long, and still try to play, I understand how difficult it is to actually go out there and execute.

As far as the first part of your question, I’m not going to get into the specifics of what we’re doing. I think that Milos is someone that has a big game, obviously got a lot of shots. One of the best serves in the history of tennis. He has a huge forehand.  I think he understands that he needs to be able to use that to his advantage, be more aggressive, take it to people. Exactly what he was doing in Australia, that’s the best I’ve ever seen Milos look, when he was playing down there. That’s sort of the game plan. With or without me that would be, I believe, something that he understands.

You always try to help someone with every part of the game. Just because I’m more of a touch player and have a better volley doesn’t mean that I’m never going to mention about his groundstrokes or serve or whatever. It depends. But obviously an important part of grass court play is to be aware of situations, court positioning. Volleying used to be more important, but I still think it can be important.  I think when you have a guy who is 6’5″ tall, he’s very imposing. If you ever heard me commentate, that’s a bit of a no-brainer. So hopefully he goes out there and is able to perform at the best of his ability and enjoy it. I would take pleasure in that if I could help him in that way.

Q. I noticed last week he was smiling a crazy amount on the court. I wondered if you had anything to do with that at all. He’s usually either stoic or ticked off.
JOHN McENROE: I can’t answer that. You’d probably have to speak to him.  Before I even started working with Milos, I knew him around. I have some people in New York, know people he’s friends with. To me, because I personally wasn’t able to get out on the court and enjoy it maybe at the end of the day as much as I would have liked, yeah, I play with intensity, but sometimes it was negative intensity which sometimes gets a little old. I think if there was one aspect of Roger Federer’s career that I’m jealous of is that it seemed like he really loved being out there, whereas people like myself or Sampras, most people really, are filled with angst, because it is intense and you don’t want to let down and all these other reasons you’re sort of brought up to believe is the case.  Obviously Milos has felt the best way for him to perform is to sort of keep an even keel and not show much emotion, go about it. I don’t think he hired me so I would say, Look, keep exactly the same way. I believe he’ll be a better player when he’s able to express himself more positively.  Murray, you watch Murray, Andy starts screaming at his box, whatever. People prefer he didn’t do that. It could cost him at times, maybe when he played Djokovic, not a lot of guys but a couple guys.  Maybe where Milos would be able to enjoy this. This is tough to do, but there’s great rewards. It is a little bit like, Look, trust me, I’ve been there, I didn’t do as good a job, and hopefully you can have more fun with this and enjoy it.  I believe he can. It’s not something where suddenly you’re going to start acting like Rafael Nadal. Over time, if you look at Novak, I think he’s done a great job of turning lemons into lemonade, things that were going on in the court in the past. Now he uses the crowd better, gets into it. He recognizes the situation, takes advantage of it. That’s a great quality he’s got now. I’d like to see Milos do that, as well.
CHRISSIE EVERT: That’s one thing that Serena is lacking right now, is maybe she should be enjoying the journey and the process a little bit more. She certainly doesn’t appear to be happy all the time on the court.

THE MODERATOR: Chrissie, you have to go, but we’ll take a few more for John on the line. I thank you for your contributions today.
CHRISSIE EVERT: Thank you. Bye, John. See you next week.
JOHN McENROE: Bye, Chrissie.

Q. John, there was an article that Pete Sampras did a while back. It was in the form of a letter to himself as a young player where he reflected on emerging into the game, giving himself a few tips. If you could go back, give yourself a tip or two when you were emerging, what would that be?
JOHN McENROE: Well, it would be to act more like Connors in the sense that he’d lose it and freak out, but he’d have his arm around someone, loving every minute of it, embracing, laughing it off, not thinking if you laughed, you’d lose your intensity. Or make a joke. Sometimes I thought things would be humorous if I said it, I didn’t say it, I said almost the opposite. So just enjoying it on the court more, which is easier said than done.  Certainly the way I played, I was sort of brought up to be really intense, not let down. If you let down, you lose it. God forbid, if you enjoyed it, had fun, your game would drop.  If I had let myself let that happen, I feel like I would have enjoyed it even more, even though when I look back I feel pretty lucky and fortunate. It’s at the time when I was competing to win these majors, perhaps I would have been able to enjoy it more in the later part of my career.

Q. Jimmy was your great rival. He interacted with the crowd, getting the crowd behind him. Did that piss you off? Also, has anyone since Jimmy approached that, had that skill set?
JOHN McENROE: It pissed me off, but I also respected it. I was like, Wow, this guy is like a maestro out here, he can do this. It drove me crazy, but I wish I had done it more myself, so… That’s as simple as that.  I don’t think there’s someone that I’ve ever seen that has controlled the crowd as well as Jimmy Connors, as far as I can see. The game is different now. The challenge system has changed. It’s better for the player. You feel like you’re going to get a second look. That’s comforting.

I think Nadal has played with the type of intensity and exuberance in a way. He didn’t get with the crowd, but he’s just so fired up, like every point is his last point, pump the fist, jump up, being down two sets to love even. He’d hold serve, he’d be screaming. I really respected that, especially a little bit earlier. When you see it a little more often, it’s tougher to do when you’re not winning as much. Even now you see him, even meaningless it’s considered, he still gets fired up.

I don’t think there’s ever going to be someone that lit it up. Kyrgios, he does things where he drives everybody crazy, but he does things where he’s magical in a way. If he actually ever puts a potpourri of things together in a way that it’s going to be difficult to do, because he’s going to need the right people, understand what this is all about, the commitment, all this other stuff. He’s got the type of personality where he could light things up, drive players crazy because of his skill, but also because his ability to sort of interact. He’s doing that when Milos is playing. He’s talking to everybody, always talking, drives you nuts. Some of it can be funny, what he said, some of it can be annoying, some of it can be complimentary. He always seems to be doing something.  You have different sides of the spectrum. But he’s someone that could potentially bring a lot to the table.

Q. John, your thoughts on Eugenie Bouchard’s game heading into Wimbledon? Have you been watching her closely enough to comment?
JOHN McENROE: You know, I haven’t seen her play enough to say for sure. I think because of the unpredictability of grass, in terms of how little people play on it, it would make things more open.  I haven’t seen anything, me personally, from the dozen or so times I’ve seen her play since she had these monumental struggles that would say, Okay, I’m ready to see her break through and make this huge move.  The fact she had a year where she was at the end of majors consistently would lead me to believe that if the right set of circumstances took place, the confidence could start building again.  I don’t see much confidence right now at all. But she’s out there. I think she’s back with Saviano. It’s sort of in a sense what Murray is doing. She clearly had this great one year where it was way better than anything she’s ever done.  It’s a work in progress. To me, I don’t see the confidence right now that would lead me to believe it’s going to be much of a run. Stranger things have happened.

Q. Your relationship with Milos, is it all business or have you become friends with him? What kind of guy is he?
JOHN McENROE: I think Milos is a really class act. I think he’s extremely smart. He’s a guy I knew a little bit from before. I was supportive, because I always try to be supportive of the young guys coming up. I saw something obviously with his serve where you’re like, Oh, my God, this guy has one of the greatest serves in the history of tennis. He’s a respectful guy. He’s very professional and dedicated. I want him to enjoy this more.  So I’d be supportive whether I was working with him or not. I have been because I know some people that are around him, kids of parents that I’m friends with, he’s younger than some of my kids. He has got a place in New York. I’ve seen him a few times not at the US Open or something.  I’m probably a little bit too old that, like, we’re buddies. But any part of a professional relationship, at least for me, you try to figure out what he’s about, what makes him tick. You sort of try to fit in because this is something he’s been doing for a long time, and I’m not going to walk in and go, Now you do it this way.  We had a good week of practice before Queen’s. He played well at Queen’s. He was up a set and 3-Love against Murray. He missed a backhand volley, a challenge, missed by a quarter of an inch to be at 4-1. He was unlucky not to win that game. He should have won the match in straight sets. But he didn’t.

Now we have to get him focused for Wimbledon, obviously which matters quite a bit more. I think hopefully he’s one of the half dozen guys that can win it. He has a good team around him. Carlos Moya I think has done an excellent job. I said earlier in this call, it’s the best I’ve ever seen Milos play, at the Australian, get him back to where he’s a presence, an intimidating one. He’s getting there. Hopefully Carlos will be back here and I’ll be doing commentating mainly. Hopefully I’ll be able to get a chance to be out there and support him. But my professional commitments with ESPN in doing Wimbledon, and some BBC, mainly ESPN, will preclude me from doing too much with Milos. But that was understood before.  Whatever I can do, I’ll be around, want to be supportive, discuss strategy with who he plays, obviously, and that other stuff.

Q. John, I’m obviously obsessed with Andy’s attempts to break into Djokovic’s dominance. Is there a chance he could be more susceptible after completing the career slam or is it more likely he’ll relax and be more formidable?
JOHN McENROE: That’s a good question. That’s a tremendous question that I don’t know the answer to. I would say Andy’s hoping the former takes place.  I doubt that (Novak) is going to let down. I think there may be, if anything, more pressure because he’ll be going for the actual calendar-year slam. This is something monumental. He’s already done something monumental.  He’s in a fantastic space. He’s unbelievably consistent, scary consistent. Andy played well, played a great first set at the French. This guy stepped it up to like a gear that was frighteningly good. It was like taking a body blow, a shot to the stomach. It was hard to recuperate. He made a little bit of a run at the end, but the damage had been done.  This guy, he’s very, very formidable. I think Andy is playing extremely well, actually the best I’ve ever seen him play at the French. First time I thought he had the chance to win it.

He’s as prepared as he possibly can be. I think his chances are better, for reasons I mentioned earlier. The crowd will be much more behind him. I think the game suits him better. He sort of has that cat-and-mouse thing. Novak has gotten much better at that, too.  It’s a tall order, but I think if you said to me he has a better shot of beating Novak at Wimbledon than the French, although he could have done it, I think he’s got a better shot.  He’s positioned himself as well as he possibly can. He hasn’t beaten him in a while. He beat him in Rome. He’s believing more. But that’s certainly another reason why I thought he brought Ivan in.

 

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Andy Murray Nets Record Fifth Queen’s Club Title on First “Father’s Day”

(June 19, 2016) LONDON – Was Sunday’s match Andy Murray versus Milos Raonic or John McEnroe vs Ivan Lendl? There was a moment…

Leading a set and serving at 3-1 in the second set, Raonic blasted (yet another) first serve and followed it in to the net, where he hit a perfectly formed classical backhand volley deep to Murray’s sideline. Murray immediately raised his arm and Hawkeye was consulted. It was out, by a centimeter or two. A few seconds and a couple of passing shots later, Murray was serving at 2-3 and holding for 3-3, and not long after that it was set-all.

Old-timers were ready with the historical analogy: it was just such a volley that cost McEnroe his only career chance at the French Open title! And he was playing Lendl! And leading by two sets and a break!

All week, Queen’s Club has been playing up the historical potential of this year’s tournament. Eight players have won the title four times: Ritchie, Wilding, Emerson, McEnroe, Becker, Roddick, and…Murray. If Murray wins this year, he’ll break the record. The press areas are adorned with posters of each of the eight players, lest we forget.

Where it seems clear Raonic can use McEnroe’s help is on covering the net. He has, of course, tremendously long arms (sleeve-watchers noted that he’d skipped the one-arm compression sleeve for this match, but it was notable that if he didn’t win the point on the first volley Murray was often readily able to pass him.

Murray broke again in the first game of the third set and held that advantage to 5-3. Raonic saved two championship points with fine serves, and then Murray fashioned a third with another of those passing shots. On the final point, Raonic came in – and couldn’t get his attempted volley over the net.

So Murray has his record-breaking fifth title and a nation hoping that Lendl’s reappearance in the player’s box bodes good things for a few weeks hence. Raonic, in congratulating him, wished him something he felt was more important: his first happy Father’s Day.

By Wendy M. Grossman

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Madison Keys Wins Birmingham for Second Career WTA Crown

BIRMINGHAM, ENGLAND - JUNE 19: Madison Keys of United States celebrates with the Maud Watson trophy after her victory in the Women's Singles Final on day seven of the WTA Aegon Classic at Edgbaston Priory Club on June 19, 2016 in Birmingham, England.  (Photo by Steve Bardens/Getty Images for LTA) Used by permission Getty/LTA

BIRMINGHAM, ENGLAND – JUNE 19: Madison Keys of United States celebrates with the Maud Watson trophy after her victory in the Women’s Singles Final on day seven of the WTA Aegon Classic at Edgbaston Priory Club on June 19, 2016 in Birmingham, England. (Photo by Steve Bardens/Getty Images for LTA) Used by permission Getty/LTA

(June 19, 2016) American Madison Keys is the new Aegon Classic Birmingham singles champion after an emphatic 63 64 victory over Barbora Strycova at the Edgbaston Priory Club on Sunday.

Victory at the WTA Premier event marked a second grasscourt title on British soil for Keys, who also won the Aegon International Eastbourne in 2014. She was also a quarter-finalist at Wimbledon last year and will go into this year’s Championships as contender after an impressive week in Birmingham.

“I’m feeling pretty good,” said 21-year-old Keys, ranked 16 and seeded seventh in Birmingham. “I think getting this many matches in a row was a huge opportunity that I think that can definitely help me at Wimbledon.

It definitely gives me some confidence and I would love to follow this one up with that. It feels good knowing that a lot of people who have done well here have done well at Wimbledon.”

Strycova had some consolation when she and Karolina Pliskova won the doubles title with a 63 76(1) win over Alla Kudryayseva and Vania King. The doubles final had to be moved indoors mid-match when rain returned at the end of the first set.

“She was too good today,” said Stycova of Keys’ performance in the singles final. “Of course, losing the final is always disappointing. But I played good couple matches and I beat good players on grass.”

Both players paid tribute to the Edgbaston Priory Club grounds team and the immaculate grass courts that they produced for the tournament. Keys took time after the final to thank them in person and pose for a photo with Head of Grounds David Lawrence and his team.

“The groundsmen were amazing. The fact that the court held up as well as it did, considering how much rain we got, just shows how amazing they were and how much hard work they put into this week. They were a huge part of this week.”

Ranking points and prizemoney won:
Keys: $USD146,200 and 470 ranking points
Strycova: $USD77,850 (plus $USD22,810 for the doubles) and 470 ranking points

AEGON CLASSIC – BIRMINGHAM, GBR
$846,000
JUNE 13 – 19 , 2016

RESULTS – JUNE 19, 2016
Women’s Singles – Final
[7] M. Keys (USA) d B. Strycova (CZE) 63 64

Women’s Doubles – Final
Ka. Pliskova (CZE) / B. Strycova (CZE) d V. King (USA) / A. Kudryavtseva (RUS) 63 76(1)

AEGON CLASSIC BIRMINGHAM 2016 BY THE NUMBERS:
37 broadcasters from 150+ territories/markets.
832,552,743 million potential worldwide TV audience
386,646 page views on Aegon Classic Birmingham
2500 (approx.) tennis balls used
64 ballboys and girls from Bishop Challoner Catholic College, Kings Heath, Birmingham
5,000 Nature Valley protein bars
1500 towels
90 umpires, supervisors and line judges from the UK and across the World
70 volunteer stewards
40 groundstaff
35 kilos of coffee
80 litres of organic fruit juice
218 kilos of pasta

Tennis Statistics (up to and including singles final)*
Total is matches played : 73
Total games played : 1783
Total points played: 23 ,062
Total sets played : 169
Total three-set matches : 23
Total tiebreak sets played : 22
Total aces : 537
Most aces by player : Madison Keys with 35
Longest main draw match played  : 2 hrs 50 mins  Rd of 16 Carla Suarez Navarro d Andrea Petkovic 4-6, 7-6(5), 7-6(5)

*Tennis statistics courtesy of SAP – the official Cloud and Analytics Partner of the WTA

Written by Eleanor Preston

 

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Wimbledon Wild Card Update: Former Champion Lleyton Hewitt Given a Doubles Wild Card

 

 

LleytonHewittHOF

(June 18, 2016) 2002 Wimbledon champion Lleyton Hewitt has been given a doubles wild card into the Wimbledon championships. The All England Club issued a wild card update on Saturday. Hewitt, who retired from singles after the Australian Open, played Davis Cup doubles for Australian in a first-round World Group tie against the United States.

Hewitt will play doubles with Jordan Thompson The Championships.

Here  is the updated wild card list:

Gentlemen’s Singles

1. Liam BROADY (GBR)
2. Dustin BROWN (GER)
3. Brydan KLEIN (GBR)
4. Radek STEPANEK (CZE)
5. Alex WARD (GBR)
6. James WARD (GBR)
7. To be announced
8. To be announced

Ladies’ Singles

1. Daniela HANTUCHOVA (SVK)
2. Marina MELNIKOVA (RUS)
3. Tara MOORE (GBR)
4. Laura ROBSON (GBR)
5. Katie SWAN (GBR)
6. To be announced
7. To be announced
8. To be announced

Gentlemen’s Doubles

1. Kyle EDMUND (GBR) and James WARD (GBR)
2. Dan EVANS (GBR) and Lloyd GLASSPOOL (GBR)
3. Lleyton HEWITT (AUS) and Jordan THOMPSON (AUS)
4. Brydan KLEIN (GBR) and Alex WARD (GBR)
5.
Jonathan MARRAY (GBR) and Adil SHAMASDIN (CAN)
6. Ken SKUPSKI (GBR) and Neil SKUPSKI (GBR)
7. Not used – Next direct acceptance

Ladies’ Doubles

1. Ashleigh BARTY (AUS) and Laura ROBSON (GBR)
2. Daniela HANTUCHOVA (SVK) and Donna VEKIC (CRO)
3. Tara MOORE (GBR) and Conny PERRIN (SUI)
4. Jocelyn RAE (GBR) and Anna SMITH (GBR)
5. Not used – Next direct acceptance
6. Not used – Next direct acceptance
7. Not used – Next direct acceptance

Mixed Doubles

1. To be announced
2. To be announced
3. To be announced
4. To be announced
5. To be announced

Gentlemen’s Wheelchair Singles

1. Alfie HEWITT (GBR)

Gentlemen’s Wheelchair Doubles

1. To be announced

Ladies’ Wheelchair Singles

1. Louise HUNT (GBR)

Ladies’ Wheelchair Doubles

1. To be announced

Qualifying Gentlemen’s Singles

1. Edward CORRIE (GBR)
2. Daniel COX (GBR)
3. Lloyd GLASSPOOL (GBR)
4. Joe SALISBURY (GBR)
5. Daniel SMETHURST (GBR)
6. Marcus WILLIS (GBR)
7. Not used – Next direct acceptance
8. Not used – Next direct acceptance
9. Not used – Next direct acceptance

Qualifying Ladies’ Singles

1. Ashleigh BARTY (AUS)
2. Katie BOULTER (GBR)
3. Freya CHRISTIE (GBR)
4. Harriet DART (GBR)
5. Katy DUNNE (GBR)
6. Maia LUMSDEN (GBR)
7. Gabriella TAYLOR (GBR)
8. Lisa WHYBOURN (GBR)

Qualifying Gentlemen’s Doubles

1. To be announced
2. To be announced

Qualifying Ladies’ Doubles

1. To be announced
2. To be announced

 

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Radek Stepanek, Dustin Brown and Laura Robson Among Wimbledon Main Draw Wild Cards

Dustin BRown

Dustin Brown

(June 15, 2016) Radek Stepanek, Dustin Brown and Laura Robson are among the first Wimbledon main draw wild cards announced on Wednesday.

Stepanek from the Czech Republic is a 2006 Wimbledon quarterfinalist. Germany’s Brown, currently ranked at No. 87  was a qualifier when he upset two-time Wimbledon champion Rafael Nadal last year in the second round

British players awarded wild cards include – Laura Robson, a former Wimbledon Junior champion, Liam Broady, Alex Ward, James Ward Tara Moore and Katie Swan.

Other wild cards went to 2002 quarterfinalist Daniela Hantuchova and Marina Melnikova.

Wimbledon begins on June 27.

Here is the official list so far:

Gentlemen’s Singles

  1.    Liam BROADY (GBR)
    2.   Dustin BROWN (GER)
    3.   Radek STEPANEK (CZE)
    4.   Alex WARD (GBR)
    5.   James WARD (GBR)
    6.   To be announced
    7.    To be announced
    8.   To be announced

Ladies’ Singles

  1.     Daniela HANTUCHOVA (SVK)
    2.    Marina MELNIKOVA (RUS)
    3.    Tara MOORE (GBR)
    4.    Laura ROBSON (GBR)
    5.    Katie SWAN (GBR)
    6.    To be announced
    7.     To be announced
    8.    To be announced

Gentlemen’s Doubles

  1.     Dan EVANS (GBR) and Lloyd GLASSPOOL (GBR)
    2.    Brydan KLEIN (GBR) and Alex WARD (GBR)
    3.    Jonathan MARRAY (GBR) and Adil SHAMASDIN (CAN)
    4.    Ken SKUPSKI (GBR) and Neil SKUPSKI (GBR)
    5.    To be announced
    6.    To be announced
    7.     To be announced

Ladies’ Doubles

  1.     Ashleigh BARTY (AUS) and Laura ROBSON (GBR)
    2.    Naomi BROADY (GBR) and Heather WATSON (GBR)
    3.    Jocelyn RAE (GBR) and Anna SMITH (GBR)
    4.    To be announced
    5.    To be announced
    6.    To be announced
    7.     To be announced
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Andy Murray Reunites with Former Coach Ivan Lendl

314Murrayinpress2-001

(June 12, 2016) Andy Murray is back with former coach Ivan Lendl. The world No. 2 had recently parted ways with coach Amelie Mauresmo.

Murray who is playing at Queens Club this week, talked to AEGON Champions TV about coming into the grass court season after some rest after the clay court season.

“Yeah, well I took five days off,” said Murray.  “I didn’t do anything from Monday to Friday. I came in and practised here on Saturday but yeah I mean I’m obviously excited for the start of the grass court season. You kind of want to get out there and get used to the conditions but also you have to realise how long the clay court season was for me. I’d never done that well on clay before so I needed to let my body rest and recover a little bit before I started practising on the grass again.”

“I think obviously playing matches helps. And the amount of matches that I’ve played as well. Also the situations that I’ve been in, I’ve played a lot of tight matches, quite a lot of long matches so physically I’m not so concerned. Needing to get in much better shape, I think I’ve played enough matches for that. And yeah it’s just a matter of trying to maintain your timing with the change of surface which could take a little bit of time, but the first couple of practices have been good and that’s positive.”

Asked about being back with Lendl, he said:

“Yeah, well hopefully it will be for a long time, from my side. He’s coming over, he’ll be here for the tournament and it’s good for him to spend a bit of time with the rest of the team as well to see how things work out. But provided everything’s good, it will hopefully go on for a long time.”

“I think the most successful period of my career was while I was working with Ivan. I know what he can offer. The experiences he had I think psychologically he helped me in the major competitions and they’re obviously the events I’m trying to win and am competing for. I hope he can bring that same experience and those same benefits that he did last time.”

Murray is aiming for a fifth title at Queen’s Club.

“Yeah it’s a big goal of mine to try and win here a fifth time,” said the Scot. “It’s a great event, always with a really strong field. You know it’s got so much history this event, many of the greatest players ever have played and won here over the years. So if I can do it again and get to five, it would be a big achievement.”

The 29-year-old Murray won two majors and an Olympic gold medal in singles under Lendl’s tutelage – the 2012 gold medal, 2012 U.S. Open and 2013 Wimbledon.

“I had two very successful years working with Ivan, he’s single-minded and knows what it takes to win the big events,” Murray said in a statement on his website. “I’m looking forward to Ivan joining the team again and helping me try and reach my goals.”

Aegon Championships
London, Great Britain

SCHEDULE – MONDAY, 13 JUNE 2016

CENTRE COURT start 12:30 pm
[4] R. Gasquet (FRA) vs S. Johnson (USA)
[WC] D. Evans (GBR) vs P. Mathieu (FRA)
G. Dimitrov (BUL) vs [PR] J. Tipsarevic (SRB)
F. Lopez (ESP) vs [5] M. Cilic (CRO)

COURT 1 start 12:30 pm
Qualifying – [1] K. Anderson (RSA) vs [5] J. Vesely (CZE) 76(2) 33
B. Paire (FRA) / S. Wawrinka (SUI) vs [2] J. Murray (GBR) / B. Soares (BRA)
[WC] J. Erlich (ISR) / C. Fleming (GBR) vs [WC] A. Bedene (GBR) / K. Edmund (GBR)

COURT 9 start 12:30 pm
Qualifying – [2] V. Pospisil (CAN) vs T. Kamke (GER) 36 75 00
After suitable rest – [Q] C. Guccione (AUS) / A. Sa (BRA) vs K. Anderson (RSA) / R. Bautista Agut (ESP)

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The Man with the Silver Bowl – Behind the Scenes at The Queen’s Club Draw

By Wendy M. Grossman

1-Queens Club draw Ceremony Wendy Grossman Tennis Panorama News

(June 11, 2016) LONDON, England – “Don’t look,” cautioned the man bearing the silver bowl.

Tennis conspiracy theorists always think tournament draws are fixed. Sometimes – for example, the 1996 US Open, when the players threatened to boycott unless the draw was remade – there are good reasons. In that case, the seedings had been announced after the draw had already been announced, and because they didn’t strictly follow the rankings, there were legitimate questions asked about whether the tournament was favoring American stars. A 2011 study of ten years of men’s and women’s singles Grand Slam draws found that the other Slams did indeed seem to produce random draws, but that that the US Open draws showed anomalies.

More common claims are that the draw is fixed to ease one or another player’s path or that the placing of seeds 3 and 4 is fixed in order to keep a particular pairing apart until the final. Every time a new draw for one of the majors is announced, you’ll find someone in a tennis discussion forum complaining that Roger Federer always gets an easy draw and Rafael Nadal a hard one, or  Novak Djokovic a tough road and Nadal an easy one…or some variation of that with whatever players the poster cares about.

Others would just like to tinker with the rules governing how draws are made. Over the years people have suggested that the semifinal pairings should always be 1-4 and 2-3, or that the entire draw should be remade before the quarter-finals to rebalance the gaps left by defeated seeds. Another favorite suggestion is that the majors should go back to seeding 16 players instead of 32, the rule until 2001. Doing so, the argument goes, would make the early rounds a little more tantalizing. I incline toward this latter idea myself, but it’s unlikely to happen because seeding 32 players was a concession Wimbledon made as part of a settlement of player complaints. The Spanish players were offended by the All-England’s habit of revising the seeding list to take into account past results on grass, which sometimes dropped the Spaniards out of the seeding list. This, they felt, was unfair: sure they often lost in the early rounds, but, they reasoned, they got no reverse consideration at the French Open, where they could be expected to do well but Pete Sampras was still top seed despite his habit of losing in the first two rounds.

2-Queens Club draw Wendy Grossman - portraits

Back to the man with the silver bowl. We are in the Presidents’ Room at Queen’s Club, surrounded by oil portraits, one of which is a dead ringer for Kaiser Wilhelm (it’s actually the Rt Hon Lord of Dalkeith, the club president from 1874 to 1879). The room is full of journalists and various people involved with running either the club or the tournament. (You can easily tell them apart. The people involved with the club are dressed for a cocktail party; tournament staff are wearing sponsored sports stuff; and the journalists look like they’ve been dragged in off the street.) At the front, next to a populated head table is a large screen with a blank 32-slot draw, and a load of numbered plastic tokens. We are introduced to three people who together have bid £250,000 (to be given to a children’s charity) for the right to be here today. Also on hand: Marin Cilic, the 2012 champion of this event. All of this, including the presence of a player, is fairly standard, though the exact mechanics vary.

The ritual begins with slotting the name of the top seed – Andy Murray – on line number 1 and second seed Stan Wawrinka on line 32. Next, the tokens for 3 and 4 are placed in the bowl and Queen’s man in the grey suit asks one of the dignitaries to pick one. This is where “Don’t look!” comes in. The one that is drawn – fourth seed Richard Gasquet – is placed on line 9, and the other, McEnroe-enhanced third seed Milos Raonic, on line 24. That settles the projected semifinal pairings. Next, the tokens for seeds 5 to 8 are placed in the bowl, and the man bowl is offered to three different people to fill the quarterfinal spots. Finally, the rest of the tokens are placed in the bowl, and the man goes around offering it to various people in the audience, even soliciting volunteers. Each person draws out one of the remaining numbers and the team at the front places it in the next empty line of the draw. There are tokens for qualifiers, whose names won’t be known until tomorrow (assuming the rain delay ends in time). These will also be drawn randomly to fill the empty spaces left for them.

As they go, the on-screen board fills in and profiles of the players and their match pairings pop up alongside. Some of the matches sound much tastier than the first round at Wimbledon will be. Cilic, interviewed, noted that the cut-off for the main draw this week was 44, which he thinks is the highest for any tournament on the tour. Murray, seeking his record-breaking fifth title here this year, draws Nicolas Mahut in the first round. Definitely a tough one: Mahut has grass cred. Besides being, famously, the loser in 2010’s three-day first-round Wimbledon encounter with John Isner, he’s a former finalist here who might have won the title but for an unlucky netcord, and recently the world’s number one doubles player. Other first-round contests that catch the eye: Nick Kyrgios versus Raonic sounds like an old-style serving contest; John Isner will have to contend with just-back Juan Martin del Potro; and Cilic faces Feliciano Lopez, the good-on-grass Spaniard who has troubled plenty of players here over the years.

Most draws, while not attended with quite as much ceremony, are pretty much like this: public events, with at least one player, some press, and various others in attendance. While it might be possible to fix the draw somewhere sometime, the intent is to make the process transparent and trustworthy. Conspiracy theorists should look elsewhere.

 

Queen’s Club Draws

Related articles:

A Look at the History of Queen’s Club with CEO Andrew Stewart

Keeping the Queen’s Club Grass Courts Perfect; Meet Graham Kimpton

Approach Shots: Getting to Know Tennis Umpire Ali Nili

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Tale of the Tape – Novak Djokovic Versus Andy Murray for Roland Garros Title

2016 Roland Garros
Men’s Day 15 Preview
Sunday 5 June
Final

NO. 1 NOVAK DJOKOVIC (SRB) v NO. 2 ANDY MURRAY (GBR)

2016 Roland Garros marks the 115th edition of the French Championships and the 86th tournament since the event became international in 1925. It is also the 193rd Grand Slam tournament of the Open Era, the first of which was 1968 Roland Garros, making this the 49th French Open.

Prize money and ATP ranking points

Today’s champion receives €2,000,000 in prize money, while the runner-up collects €1,000,000. In total, the men’s singles prize fund for 2016 Roland Garros is €12,032,000, a 15.6% increase on 2015. The winner is also awarded 2000 ATP ranking points, with the runner-up receiving 1200.

ATP rankings update

Djokovic and Murray will remain at No. 1 and No. 2, respectively, when the ATP rankings are updated on Monday 6 June. Here’s how the rest of the Top 10 will look on Monday.

1    Novak Djokovic
2    Andy Murray
3    Roger Federer
4    Rafael Nadal
5    Stan Wawrinka
6    Kei Nishikori
7    Dominic Thiem
8    Tomas Berdych
9    Milos Raonic
10    Richard Gasquet

No. 1 v No. 2

The last time the No. 1 and No. 2 seeds met in the Roland Garros final was in 2014, when No. 1 Rafael Nadal defeated No. 2 Djokovic. It is the 9th time the Top 2 seeds have met in the Roland Garros final in the Open Era, with the No. 2 seed holding a 6-2 win-loss record against the No. 1 seed in finals here. The only victories for the No. 1 seed over the No. 2 seed here came in 1978, when No. 1 Bjorn Borg defeated No. 2 Guillermo Vilas, and 2014, when No. 1 Nadal defeated No. 2 Djokovic.
This the 4th consecutive meeting between the Top 2 seeds at a Grand Slam. The last time the No. 2 seed defeated the No. 1 seed in a Grand Slam final was at the 2013 US Open, when Nadal defeated Djokovic.
The last time the No. 1 seed played the No. 2 seed in a Grand Slam final when neither player had won that Grand Slam before was at 1984 Roland Garros, when No. 2 Ivan Lendl beat No. 1 John McEnroe.

2016 leaders
Djokovic is in 1st place while Murray is in 5th place for the most Tour-level match-wins in 2016.

Most wins in 2016
Novak Djokovic    43-3
Dominic Thiem         41-11
Kei Nishikori        32-10
Rafael Nadal         29-8
Andy Murray        28-5

Murray is in joint-3rd place for most clay court wins in 2016 with an 18-2 win-loss record this year. Djokovic is in 6th place with a 15-2 win-loss record on clay so far this year.

Most clay court wins in 2016
Dominic Thiem        25-6
Rafael Nadal        21-4
Pablo Carreno Busta    18-11
Andy Murray         18-2
Pablo Cuevas        17-6
Novak Djokovic    15-2

Djokovic tops the list for the most titles won this year with 5. Murray, meanwhile, is bidding to win his 2nd title of 2016 and join the 5 men to have won multiple titles this year.

Most titles in 2016
Novak Djokovic        5         Doha, Australian Open, Indian Wells-1000, Miami-1000, Madrid-1000
Dominic Thiem          3          Buenos Aires, Acapulco, Nice
Stan Wawrinka             3           Chennai, Dubai, Geneva
Pablo Cuevas            2            Rio de Janeiro, Sao Paulo
Rafael Nadal             2           Monte Carlo-1000, Barcelona

Head-to-head: Djokovic leads 23-10
2006    AMS Madrid        Hard (I)        R16    Djokovic    16 75 63
2007    AMS Indian Wells    Hard (O)    SF    Djokovic    62 63
2007    AMS Miami        Hard (O)    SF    Djokovic    61 60
2008    AMS Monte Carlo    Clay (O)    R16    Djokovic    60 64
2008    AMS Toronto        Hard (O)    QF    Murray        63 76(3)
2008    AMS Cincinnati        Hard (O)    FR    Murray        76(4) 76(5)
2009    Miami-1000        Hard (O)    FR    Murray        62 75
2011    Australian Open    Hard (O)    FR    Djokovic    64 62 63
2011    Rome-1000        Clay (O)    SF    Djokovic    61 36 76(2)
2011    Cincinnati-1000        Hard (O)    FR    Murray        64 3-0 ret. (right shoulder injury)
2012    Australian Open    Hard (O)    SF    Djokovic    63 36 67(4) 61 75
2012    Dubai            Hard (O)    SF    Murray        62 75
2012    Miami-1000        Hard (O)    FR    Djokovic    61 76(4)
2012    Olympic Tennis Event    Grass (O)    SF    Murray        75 75
2012    US Open        Hard (O)    FR    Murray        76(10) 75 26 36 62
2012    Shanghai-1000        Hard (O)    FR    Djokovic    57 76(11) 63
2012    ATP World Tour Finals    Hard (I)        RR    Djokovic    46 63 75
2013    Australian Open    Hard (O)    FR    Djokovic    67(2) 76(3) 63 62
2013    Wimbledon        Grass (O)    FR    Murray        64 75 64
2014     Miami-1000        Hard (O)    QF    Djokovic    75 63
2014    US Open        Hard (O)    QF    Djokovic    76(1) 67(1) 62 64
2014    Beijing            Hard (O)    SF    Djokovic    63 64
2014     Paris-1000        Hard (I)        QF    Djokovic    75 62
2015    Australian Open    Hard (O)    FR    Djokovic    76(5) 67(4) 63 60
2015     Indian Wells-1000    Hard (O)    SF    Djokovic    62 63
2015    Miami-1000        Hard (O)    FR    Djokovic    76(3) 46 60
2015    Roland Garros     Clay (O)    SF    Djokovic    63 63 57 57 61
2015    Montreal-1000        Hard (O)    FR    Murray        64 46 63
2015    Shanghai-1000        Hard (O)    SF    Djokovic    61 63
2015    Paris-1000        Hard (I)        FR    Djokovic    62 64
2016    Australian Open    Hard (O)    FR    Djokovic    61 75 76(3)
2016     Madrid-1000        Clay (O)    FR    Djokovic    62 36 63
2016     Rome-1000        Clay (O)    FR    Murray        63 63
Djokovic has won 12 of his last 14 matches against Murray. His only losses in that time came in the finals at 2015 Montreal-1000 and 2016 Rome-1000. Djokovic has a 9-7 win-loss record against Murray in Tour-level finals.

Djokovic has a 7-2 win-loss record against Murray at the Grand Slams, and a 4-2 win-loss record against Murray in Grand Slam finals. The only player Djokovic has beaten on more occasions than Murray at a Grand Slam is Roger Federer (defeated 9 times).

It will be the 7th meeting between these 2 players in a Grand Slam final which puts them in joint 2nd position on the all-time leaderboard for most match-ups in a Grand Slam final.

Most head-to-heads in Grand Slam finals (Open Era)
Head-to-head    Grand Slam final meetings
Roger Federer v Rafael Nadal    8
Novak Djokovic v Rafael Nadal
Novak Djokovic v Andy Murray    7
7
Andre Agassi v Pete Sampras
Ivan Lendl v Mats Wilander    5
5

Murray and Djokovic are the closest Grand Slam finalists by age. Murray is just 7 days older than Djokovic. The previous closest Grand Slam finalists in terms of age were Guillermo Vilas and Jimmy Connors who met at the 1977 US Open when Vilas was 16 days older than Connors.

Djokovic has a 4-1 win-loss record against Murray on a clay court.

The winner of this final will enter the list for the most attempts to win Roland Garros. Djokovic will go top of the list for the most attempts before winning the title here if he wins, while Murray will go joint-6th in the list with Albert Costa if he wins the title here:
Attempts to win Roland Garros (Open Era)
Novak Djokovic    12??
Andre Agassi
Andres Gomez
Roger Federer
Stan Wawrinka    11
11
11
11
Thomas Muster    10
Albert Costa
Andy Murray    9
9??

DJOKOVIC    v    MURRAY

29    Age    29
6’2”/1.88m    Height    6’3”/1.91m
99,673,404    Career Earnings (US$)    45,157,463
1    ATP Ranking    2
64    Titles    36
11 titles    Best Grand Slam result    2 titles
220-34    Career Grand Slam Record    165-38
54-11    Roland Garros Record    34-8
729-149    Career Record    580-170
176-43    Career Record – Clay    98-40
43-3    2016 Record    28-5
15-2    2016 Record – Clay    18-2
27-8    Career Five-Set Record    22-7
4    Comebacks from 0-2 Down    9
200-112    Career Tiebreak Record    165-102
12-2    2016 Tiebreak Record    8-4

Road to the Final
DJOKOVIC    Time        Time    MURRAY
d. Yen-Hsun Lu 64 61 61
d. (Q) Steve Darcis 75 63 64    1:30
2:17    1st round
2nd round    3:41
3:34    d. (Q) Radek Stepanek 36 36 60 63 75
d. (WC) Mathias Bourgue 62 26 46 62 63
d. Aljaz Bedene 62 63 63    2:02    3rd round    1:56    d. No. 27 Ivo Karlovic 61 64 76(3)
d.  No. 14 Roberto Bautista Agut 36 64 61 75
d.  No. 7 Tomas Berdych 63 75 63
d. No. 13 Dominic Thiem 62 61 64    3:11
2:06
1:48
Round of 16
Quarterfinals
Semifinals    2:40
3:24
2:35    d.  No. 15 John Isner 76(9) 64 63
d. No. 9 Richard Gasquet 57 76(3) 60 62
d. No. 3 Stan Wawrinka 64 62 46 62

total time on court     12:54    (IBM time)      17:50    total time on court

•    DJOKOVIC is bidding to win his first Roland Garros title and become the 3rd man in history to complete a non-calendar year Grand Slam. Only Don Budge and Rod Laver have held all 4 Grand Slam titles at the same time.

•    Budge completed his non-calendar year Grand Slam at 1938 Roland Garros before going on to win the calendar Grand Slam by winning all 4 major tournaments in a single year in 1938. Laver won all 4 majors in 1962 and 1969 – his win at the 1962 US Open completed his set of major titles.

•    Djokovic is looking to become just the 8th man – and 2nd oldest – in history to complete the career Grand Slam after Andre Agassi, Don Budge, Roy Emerson, Federer, Rod Laver, Nadal and Fred Perry. He is one of 11 men to have collected 3 of the 4 major titles in the Open Era.
Career Grand Slam achievers
Player    Completed at…    Age^
Don Budge    1938 Roland Garros     22 years 357 days
Rod Laver    1962 US Open    24 years 32 days
Rafael Nadal    2010 US Open     24 years 101 days
Fred Perry    1935 Roland Garros    26 years 15 days
Roger Federer    2009 Roland Garros    27 years 203 days
Roy Emerson    1964 Wimbledon    27 years 244 days
Novak Djokovic    2016 Roland Garros??    29 years 14 days
Andre Agassi    1999 Roland Garros    29 years 38 days
^ Age as at the end of the tournament

•    Of the 7 men to possess a career Grand Slam, 4 of them ‘completed the set’ at Roland Garros: Perry in 1935, Budge in 1938, Agassi in 1999 and Federer in 2009.

•    Roland Garros is the only Grand Slam title that Djokovic has not won. He has won 11 Grand Slam titles – at the Australian Open in 2008 (d. Jo-Wilfried Tsonga), 2011 (d. Andy Murray), 2012 (d. Nadal), 2013 (d. Murray), 2015
(d. Murray) and 2016 (d. Murray), Wimbledon in 2011 (d. Nadal), 2014 (d. Federer) and 2015 (d. Federer) and the US Open in 2011 (d. Nadal) and 2015 (d. Federer).

•    Having won the 2016 Australian Open, Djokovic is looking to become the first man in 24 years to hold the first 2 legs of the calendar Grand Slam.
Australian Open-Roland Garros double
1933        Jack Crawford
1938        Don Budge
1953        Ken Rosewall
1956        Lew Hoad
1962        Rod Laver
1963        Roy Emerson
1967        Roy Emerson
1969        Rod Laver
1988        Mats Wilander
1992        Jim Courier

•    Djokovic is looking to avoid becoming the first player in history to lose their first 4 Roland Garros finals. Federer is the only other player in history to have lost 4 Roland Garros finals (2006, 2007, 2008, 2011) but he won the title in 2009.

•    Djokovic is bidding to become only the 4th player in the Open Era (after Federer, Goran Ivanisevic and Ivan Lendl) to win a specific Grand Slam tournament after having lost their first 3 finals at that Grand Slam event. No other players in the Open Era have lost more finals before winning the title at any one Grand Slam.
No. of final appearances at one Grand Slam event before winning first title (Open Era)
Player    No. of appearances in the final at any one Grand Slam before winning the title    Years
Roger Federer    4 Roland Garros finals    Lost 2006, 2007, 2008. Won 2009
Goran Ivanisevic    4 Wimbledon finals    Lost 1992, 1994, 1998. Won 2001
Ivan Lendl    4 US Open finals    Lost 1982, 1983, 1984. Won 1985

•    Djokovic has an 11-8 win-loss record in his 19 previous Grand Slam finals and a 0-3 win-loss record in Roland Garros finals.
Djokovic’s record in Grand Slam finals
Grand Slam    Final Result
2007 US Open    l. Roger Federer 76(4) 76(2) 64
2008 Australian Open    d. Jo-Wilfried Tsonga 46 64 63 76(2)
2010 US Open    l. Rafael Nadal 64 57 64 62
2011 Australian Open    d. Andy Murray 64 62 63
2011 Wimbledon    d. Rafael Nadal 64 61 16 63
2011 US Open    d. Rafael Nadal 62 64 67(3) 61
2012 Australian Open    d. Rafael Nadal 57 64 62 67(5) 75
2012 Roland Garros    l. Rafael Nadal 64 63 26 75
2012 US Open    l. Andy Murray 76(10) 75 26 36 62
2013 Australian Open    d. Andy Murray 67(2) 76(3) 63 62
2013 Wimbledon    l. Andy Murray 64 75 64
2013 US Open    l. Rafael Nadal 62 36 64 61
2014 Roland Garros    l. Rafael Nadal 36 75 62 64
2014 Wimbledon    d. Roger Federer 67(7) 64 76(4) 57 64
2015 Australian Open    d. Andy Murray 76(5) 67(4) 63 60
2015 Roland Garros    l. Stan Wawrinka 46 64 63 64
2015 Wimbledon    d. Roger Federer 76(1) 67(10) 64 63
2015 US Open    d. Roger Federer 64 57 74 74
2016 Australian Open    d. Andy Murray 61 75 76(3)

•    Djokovic has reached his 6th consecutive Grand Slam final and taken sole ownership of 3rd place on the list for the most consecutive major finals reached in the Open Era. Roger Federer is the only man in the Open Era have reached 6 or more consecutive Grand Slam finals.

Player    Consecutive Grand Slam finals
1    Roger Federer    10 – 2005 Wimbedon – 2007 US Open
2    Roger Federer    8 – 2008 Roland Garros – 2010 Australian Open
3    Novak Djokovic    6 – 2015 Australian Open – 2016 Roland Garros
4    Rafael Nadal    5 – 2011 Roland Garros – 2012 Roland Garros

•    Djokovic has reached his 20th Grand Slam final and moved into equal-2nd place with Rafael Nadal on the all-time list of most appearances in Grand Slam finals, behind Roger Federer (28).

•    Djokovic has reached his 4th Roland Garros final and moved into equal-6th place on the list for most appearances in the Roland Garros final in the Open Era.

•    Djokovic is bidding to record his 28th straight Grand Slam match-win and record his longest Grand Slam winning streak. He has not lost a Grand Slam match since he was defeated by Stan Wawrinka in the 2015 Roland Garros final. He also won 27 straight Grand Slam matches when winning the titles at 2011 Wimbledon, the 2011 US Open and the 2012 Australian Open, and finished runner-up at 2012 Roland Garros.

•    Djokovic is bidding to record his 55th match-win at Roland Garros and close the gap on Guillermo Vilas in 3rd place on the list for most Roland Garros victories in history.

All time win-loss at Roland Garros
Rafael Nadal                                   72-2
Roger Federer                                 65-16
Guillermo Vilas                                58-17
Novak Djokovic                             54-11
Ivan Lendl                                        53-12
Jaroslav Drobny                           53-14

•    Djokovic is bidding to become the first top seed to win the title here since Rafael Nadal in 2014. The No. 1 seed has won the title at Roland Garros on just 2 occasions in the last 14 years, with Nadal triumphing as top seed here in 2011 and 2014. Overall, in the 84 French Championships played since seeding began here in 1925, the top seed has won the title 26 times.

•    Djokovic is the only male Serbian Grand Slam champion and also the only Serbian man to appear in a Grand Slam final.

•    By winning his round of 16 match here against Bautista Agut, Djokovic became the first player to surpass $100m in career prize money.

•    By defeating Darcis in the 2nd round, Djokovic recorded his 50th match-win at Roland Garros. He is one of just 3 players to have recorded 50 match-wins at each of the Grand Slams in the Open Era after Federer and Serena Williams. Djokovic has a 54-11 win-loss record here compared with 57-6 at the Australian Open, 52-8 at Wimbledon and 57-9 at the US Open.

•    Djokovic has a 5-2 win-loss record in 5-set matches at Roland Garros and a 28-8 Tour-level win-loss record in 5-set matches overall.

•    Last year here Djokovic reached his 3rd Roland Garros final (l. Wawrinka 46 64 63 64). He also reached the final here in 2012 and 2014, losing to Nadal on both occasions. Djokovic is making his 12th straight appearance at Roland Garros and his 46th consecutive appearance at a major.

•    Djokovic has played 3 clay court events in the lead up to this year’s Roland Garros. He won the title at Madrid-1000
(d. Murray), reached the final at Rome-1000 (l. Murray) and lost in the 2nd round at Monte Carlo-1000 (l. Jiri Vesely) – his earliest Tour-level defeat since losing to Grigor Dimitrov in the 2nd round at 2013 Madrid-1000.

•    Djokovic has won 5 titles so far this year. As well as winning at Madrid, he won Doha (d. Nadal), the Australian Open, Indian Wells-1000 (d. Milos Raonic) and Miami-1000 (d. Kei Nishikori) – to extend his streak of winning at least 2 titles every year since winning his first at 2006 Amersfoort (d. Nicolas Massu).

•    12 of Djokovic’s 64 career singles titles have come on clay, compared with 49 on hard court and 3 on grass.

•    Djokovic won his 2 singles rubbers to help Serbia defeat Kazakhstan 3-2 in March and reach the Davis Cup quarterfinals. Serbia will play Great Britain in Belgrade on 15-17 July.

•    Djokovic is coached by 3-time Roland Garros semifinalist Boris Becker. He has also been coached by Marian Vajda since June 2006. His wider team includes physios Miljan Amanovic and Gebhard Phil-Gritsch.

•    MURRAY is attempting to become the 2nd British man in history to win the Roland Garros title after Fred Perry, who won the title here in 1935. Murray is just the 3rd British man to reach the final here since the event became international in 1925:
British men in the final of the French Championships (since 1925)
Year    Player    Final result
1935    Fred Perry    d. Gottfried von Cramm 63 36 61 63
1936    Fred Perry    l. Gottfried von Cramm 60 26 62 26 60
1937    Bunny Austin    l. Henner Henkel 61 64 63
2016    Andy Murray    v Novak Djokovic

•    Murray is bidding to become the 3rd British player – man or woman – in history to win Roland Garros. As well as Perry in 1935, Sue Barker won the Roland Garros women’s title in 1976.
•    If Murray wins today he will become the 9th man in history to win 3 of the 4 Grand Slam titles and finish as runner-up at the 4th. Murray, who has won the US Open and Wimbledon, has finished runner-up at the Australian Open on 5 occasions.
Winning 3 Grand Slam titles and runner-up at 4th
Player     Missing Grand Slam title    Runner-up appearances
Ken Rosewall    Wimbledon    4 (1954/1956/1970/1974)
Novak Djokovic    Roland Garros???    3 (2012/2014/2015)
Ivan Lendl    Wimbledon    2 (1986-87)
Jean Borotra    US Open    1 (1926)
Jack Crawford     US Open     1 (1933)
Frank Sedgman    Roland Garros    1 (1952)
Lew Hoad    US Open    1 (1956)
Stefan Edberg    Roland Garros    1 (1989)

•    If Murray loses today he will join Jim Courier (won Australian Open and Roland Garros, lost Wimbledon and the US Open) and Fred Stolle (won Roland Garros and the US Open, lost Australia and Wimbledon) as the only 3 men in history to have won 2 of the 4 Grand Slam titles and finished as runner-up at the other 2.

•    Murray is bidding to become the 21st man in the Open Era to win 3 or more Grand Slam titles. He is also looking to become the 16th man in the Open Era to win at least 3 of the 4 Grand Slam titles.

•    Murray is a 2-time Grand Slam champion, having defeated today’s opponent in the final on both occasions. He became the first British male Grand Slam winner since Fred Perry won the 1936 US Open at the 2012 US Open, before becoming the first British man in 77 years to win the Wimbledon title in 2013.

•    Murray is bidding to become the 2nd man in the Open Era to win a Grand Slam title after coming back from 0-2 down in his opening round match. Pat Rafter is the only man in the Open Era to have won a Grand Slam after coming back from 0-2 down in his opening round match – defeating Hicham Arazi 46 46 63 63 61 in the first round at the 1998 US Open before going on to win the title.

•    Murray is bidding to become the 2nd man in the Open Era to win the Roland Garros title having been extended to 5-sets in both his 1st and 2nd round matches after Gaston Gaudio in 2004. It is the 2nd time Murray has been extended to 5-sets in both his 1st and 2nd round matches at a Grand Slam, having also played 2 five-set matches in the opening 2 rounds at the 2005 US Open.

•    Murray is bidding to defeat a No. 1 ranked player at a Grand Slam for the 3rd time in his career. His only wins over No. 1 players at the majors came against Rafael Nadal in the semifinals at the 2008 US Open and against today’s opponent in the 2013 Wimbledon final. He has 0-3 win-loss record against players ranked No. 1 at Roland Garros and a 2-11 win-loss record against players ranked No. 1 at the Grand Slams overall.

•    Since he defeated today’s opponent in the 2013 Wimbledon final, Murray has won just 2 of his last 15 meetings against players ranked No. 1. His only wins in that time came in defeating Djokovic to win the titles at 2015 Montreal-1000 and at 2016 Rome-1000.

•    Having defeated No. 1 Djokovic in the final at Rome-1000, Murray is bidding to record successive match-wins over players ranked No. 1 for the 3rd time in his career. He recorded 4 straight wins over No. 1 opposition from 2006-2009, defeating Roger Federer at 2006 AMS Cincinnnati and 2008 Dubai, and Rafael Nadal at the 2008 US Open and 2009 Rotterdam. He also defeated No.1 opposition in back-to-back matches by defeating Federer at both the 2012 Olympic Tennis Event and 2012 Shanghai-1000.

•    By reaching his 10th Grand Slam final, Murray has equalled Fred Perry for the most appearances in a Grand Slam final by a British man (since the Challenge Round was abolished at Wimbledon in 1922):

Player    Appearances in a Grand Slam final
Fred Perry    10 – US Championships 1933-34, 1936, Australian Championships 1934-35, French Championships 1935-36, Wimbledon 1934-36
Andy Murray    10 – US Open 2008, 2012, Australian Open 2010-11, 2013, 2015-16, Wimbledon 2012-13, Roland Garros – 2016

•    By reaching the final here, Murray has equalled Boris Becker in 12th place on the list for the most Grand Slam finals reached in the Open Era with 10. Only 3 active players have reached more Grand Slam finals than Murray – Roger Federer (27), Rafael Nadal (20) and today’s opponent (20).
•    By reaching the Roland Garros final for the first time, Murray has become the 10th man in the Open Era to reach the final at all 4 Grand Slam events. He is the 3rd oldest to achieve the feat:

Age to complete the set of Grand Slam final appearances (Open Era)
Player    Completed at…    Age^
Jim Courier    1993 Wimbledon    22 years 321 days
Rafael Nadal    2010 US Open    24 years 101 days
Andre Agassi    1995 Australian Open    24 years 275 days
Roger Federer    2006 Roland Garros    24 years 307 days
Novak Djokovic    2012 Roland Garros    25 years 19 days
Stefan Edberg    1991 US Open    25 years 232 days
Ivan Lendl    1986 Wimbledon    26 years 121 days
Andy Murray    2016 Roland Garros    29 years 21 days
Rod Laver*    1969 US Open    31 years 31 days
Ken Rosewall*    1971 Australian Open     36 years 73 days
^ Age as at the end of the tournament
* Also reached all 4 Slam finals in the pre-Open Era

•    Murray is bidding to record his 166th Grand Slam match-win today and close the gap on John McEnroe (167) in 9th place on the Open Era list for most victories at the majors. By reaching the semifinals here, Murray overtook Boris Becker (163) to take sole ownership of 10th place on the Open Era list.

•    Murray is bidding to extend his record for the most Roland Garros match-wins by a British man in history:

Most Roland Garros match-wins by a British man (all-time)
Player    Win-loss record
1.    Andy Murray    34-8
2.    Fred Perry    28-5
3.    Bunny Austin    23-6
4.    Patrick Hughes    21-6
5=   Billy Knight
Bobby Wilson    19-10
19-9

•    Murray is on an 11-match winning streak – his longest Tour-level winning streak on clay. His previous longest winning streak on clay was winning 10 matches in a row in winning the titles at 2015 Munich and 2015 Madrid-1000 before conceding a walkover due to fatigue against David Goffin in the 2nd round at 2015 Rome-1000.

•    Murray has never played more than 2 five-set matches at the same Grand Slam event. As well as contesting 2 five-set matches here, Murray also contested 2 five-set matches at the 2005 US Open (d. Andrei Pavel in the 1st round, l. Arnaud Clement in the 2nd round) and at 2014 Roland Garros (d. Philipp Kohlschreiber in the 3rd round,
d. Gael Monfils in the quarterfinals).

•    Murray’s win over Stepanek in the 1st round was his 9th career comeback from 0-2 down – putting him in joint-3rd place on the Open Era list for the most 0-2 comebacks with Vitas Gerulaitis, Todd Martin and Roger Federer. Only Aaron Krickstein and Becker have achieved more 0-2 comebacks at Tour-level in the Open Era with 10.

•    Murray’s win over Bourgue was his 10th 5-set match-win in his last 11 five-set matches. His only 5-set defeat in that time came against today’s opponent in the semifinals at 2015 Roland Garros. Murray has a 7-2 win-loss record in 5-set matches at Roland Garros and a 22-7 five set win-loss record overall.

•    By reaching the final here, Murray has recorded his best Roland Garros performance. His previous best performance here was reaching the semifinals in 2011 (l. Nadal), 2014 (l. Nadal) and 2015, when he lost to today’s opponent 63 63 57 57 61 in a match that was played over 2 days due to rain. This is his 9th Roland Garros appearance.

•    Murray warmed up for Roland Garros by winning the title at Rome-1000 and reaching the final at Madrid-1000
(l. today’s opponent) and the semifinals at Monte Carlo-1000 (l. Nadal). Also in 2016 Murray reached his 5th Australian Open final, losing to today’s opponent.

•    Murray plays here seeded No. 2 – his highest seeding at Roland Garros. He has now been seeded No. 2 at all 4 Grand Slam events.

•    Murray reached the semifinals of the boys’ singles as top seed at 2005 Roland Garros (l. Marin Cilic).
•    In March, Murray helped defending champions Great Britain reach the Davis Cup World Group quarterfinals for the 3rd year in a row. He won both of his singles matches in the first round tie against Japan in Birmingham, defeating Taro Daniel and Nishikori to help Great Britain defeat Japan 3-1. Great Britain plays Serbia in the quarterfinals in Belgrade on 15-17 July.

•    Murray is coached by former ATP pro Jamie Delgado.

*Statistics courtesy of the ITF

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2016 Roland Garros – Day 13 Men’s Preview

223 Wawrinka fhv
Friday, June 3, 2016
Semifinals

No. 1 Novak Djokovic (SRB) v No. 13 Dominic Thiem (AUT)
No. 2 Andy Murray (GBR) v No. 3 Stan Wawrinka (SUI)

A look at the semifinalists…

Player    Country    Age    Ranking    Best Roland Garros performance    Best Grand Slam performance
No. 1 Novak Djokovic    SRB    29    1    RU 2012, 2014, 2015    11 titles
No. 2 Andy Murray    GBR    29    2    SF 2011, 2014, 2015, 2016    2 titles
No. 3 Stan Wawrinka    SUI    31    4    W 2015    2 titles
No. 13 Dominic Thiem    AUT    22    15    SF 2016    SF 2016 Roland Garros

•    Novak Djokovic will look to keep his hopes of completing his Grand Slam set alive by defeating Dominic Thiem for a place in his 20th Grand Slam final. Thiem is looking for his first victory over the world No. 1 as he looks to continue his run at what has been his breakthrough Grand Slam.
•    Andy Murray, meanwhile, is seeking to end a 3-match losing streak against Stan Wawrinka and become the first British man to reach the Roland Garros final since Bunny Austin in 1937. If he is to achieve the feat, he will also have to end a 6-match losing streak against Top 4 opposition at the majors.
•    Defending champion Wawrinka is hoping to remain on course to successfully retain his Roland Garros title. Just 8 men have successfully defended the title here in the Open Era.
•    Murray has spent the most time on court of the 4 semifinalists with 15 hours 15 minutes of match time under his belt so far at this year’s Roland Garros, while Djokovic, despite several interruptions to his matches due to rain, has been on court for the least amount of time at just 11 hours 6 minutes.

NO. 1 NOVAK DJOKOVIC (SRB) v NO. 13 DOMINIC THIEM (AUT)

Head-to-head: Djokovic leads 2-0
2014    Shanghai-1000        Hard (O)    R32    Djokovic    63 64
2016    Miami-1000        Hard (O)    R16    Djokovic    63 64

A 3rd career meeting between the 2 players but their first at a Grand Slam.

Thiem has never taken a set off Djokovic.

Djokovic has not lost to a player ranked as low as No. 15 Thiem at a Grand Slam since losing to No. 27 Jurgen Melzer in the quarterfinals here in 2010.
Possible final head-to-heads
Murray    Wawrinka
Djokovic    23-10    19-4
Thiem    0-2    1-2

DJOKOVIC    v    THIEM

29    Age    22
6’2”/1.88m    Height    6’1”/1.85m
1    ATP Ranking    15
64    Titles    6
219-34    Career Grand Slam Record    16-9
11 titles    Best Grand Slam result    Roland Garros semifinalist 2016
53-11    Roland Garros Record    7-2
728-149    Career Record    105-68
175-43    Career Record – Clay    59-23
42-3    2016 Record    41-10
14-2    2016 Record – Clay    25-5
27-8    Career Five-Set Record    2-2
4    Comebacks from 0-2 Down    1
200-112    Career Tiebreak Record    45-43
12-2    2016 Tiebreak Record    15-9

Road to the Semifinals
DJOKOVIC    Time        Time    THIEM
d. Yen-Hsun Lu 64 61 61
d. (Q) Steve Darcis 75 63 64    1:30
2:17    1st round
2nd round    2:38
2:25    d. Inigo Cervantes 36 62 75 61
d. Guillermo Garcia-Lopez 75 64 76(3)
d. Aljaz Bedene 62 63 63    2:02    3rd round    2:50    d. Alexander Zverev 67(4) 63 63 63
d.  No. 14 Roberto Bautista Agut 36 64 61 75
d. No. 7 Tomas Berdych 63 75 63    3:11
2:06    Round of 16
Quarterfinals    2:53
2:51    d. Marcel Granollers 62 67(2) 61 64
d. No. 12 David Goffin 46 76(7) 64 61

total time on court    11:06    (IBM time)    13:37    total time on court

•    DJOKOVIC is bidding to reach his 6th consecutive Grand Slam final and take sole ownership of 3rd place on the list for the most consecutive major finals reached in the Open Era. Roger Federer is the only man in the Open Era have reached 6 or more consecutive Grand Slam finals.

Player    Consecutive Grand Slam finals
1    Roger Federer    10 – 2005 Wimbedon – 2007 US Open
2    Roger Federer    8 – 2008 Roland Garros – 2010 Australian Open
3    Novak Djokovic??    6 – 2015 Australian Open – 2016 Roland Garros??
4    Rafael Nadal    5 – 2011 Roland Garros – 2012 Roland Garros

•    Djokovic is bidding to reach his 20th Grand Slam final and move into equal-2nd place with Rafael Nadal on the all-time list of most appearances in Grand Slam finals [see table overleaf]:

1    Roger Federer    28
2=    Novak Djokovic??
Rafael Nadal    20??
20
4    Ivan Lendl    19
5    Pete Sampras    18
6    Rod Laver    17

•    Djokovic is bidding to reach his 4th Roland Garros final and move into equal-6th place on the list for most appearances in the Roland Garros final in the Open Era:

Roland Garros finals reached (Open Era)
Player    No. of GS semifinals
Rafael Nadal    9
Bjorn Borg    6
Ivan Lendl
Mats Wilander
Roger Federer    5
5
5
Novak Djokovic??
Guillermo Vilas    4??
4

•    Djokovic is through to his 30th Grand Slam semifinal. He has a 19-10 win-loss record in his 29 previous Grand Slam semifinals and a 3-4 win-loss record in his 7 previous semifinals at Roland Garros:

Grand Slam    Semifinal Result    Eventual finish
2007 Roland Garros    l. Rafael Nadal 75 64 62
2007 Wimbledon    l. Nadal 36 61 4-1 ret. (infected toe blister)
2007 US Open    d. David Ferrer 64 64 63    Runner-up
2008 Australian Open    d. Roger Federer 75 63 76(5)    Winner
2008 Roland Garros    l. Nadal 64 62 76(3)
2008 US Open    l. Federer 63 57 75 62
2009 US Open    l. Federer 76(3) 75 75
2010 Wimbledon    l. Tomas Berdych 63 76(9) 63
2010 US Open    d. Federer 57 61 57 62 75    Runner-up
2011 Australian Open    d. Federer 76(3) 75 64    Winner
2011 Roland Garros    l. Federer 76(5) 63 36 76(5)
2011 Wimbledon    d. Jo-Wilfried Tsonga 76(4) 62 67(9) 63    Winner
2011 US Open    d. Federer 67(7) 46 63 62 75    Winner
2012 Australian Open     d. Andy Murray 63 36 67(4) 61 75    Winner
2012 Roland Garros    d. Federer 64 75 63    Runner-up
2012 Wimbledon    l. Federer 63 36 64 63
2012 US Open    d. Ferrer 26 61 64 62    Runner-up
2013 Australian Open     d. Ferrer 62 62 61    Winner
2013 Roland Garros    l. Nadal 64 36 61 67(3) 97
2013 Wimbledon    d. Juan Martin del Potro 75 46 76(2) 67(6) 63    Runner-up
2013 US Open    d. Stan Wawrinka 26 76(4) 36 63 64    Runner-up
2014 Roland Garros    d. Ernests Gulbis 63 63 36 63    Runner-up
2014 Wimbledon    d. Grigor Dimitrov 64 36 76(2) 76(7)    Winner
2014 US Open    l. Kei Nishikori 64 16 76(4) 63
2015 Australian Open     d. Wawrinka 76(1) 36 64 46 60    Winner
2015 Roland Garros    d. Murray 63 63 57 57 61    Runner-up
2015 Wimbledon    d. Richard Gasquet 76(2) 64 64    Winner
2015 US Open    d. Marin Cilic 60 61 62    Winner
2016 Australian Open    d. Federer 61 62 36 63    Winner
2016 Roland Garros    v. Dominic Thiem    ??

•    By reaching his 30th Grand Slam semifinal, Djokovic has closed the gap on Roger Federer (39 semifinals) and Jimmy Connors (31) on the list for the most Grand Slam semifinal appearances in the Open Era.

•    Djokovic is bidding to record his 27th straight Grand Slam match-win and equal his longest Grand Slam winning streak. He has not lost a Grand Slam match since he was defeated by Stan Wawrinka in the 2015 Roland Garros final. His longest Grand Slam match-winning streak is 27, which took in the titles at 2011 Wimbledon, the 2011 US Open and the 2012 Australian Open, and a runner-up finish at 2012 Roland Garros.
•    Djokovic is bidding to record his 54th match-win at Roland Garros and take sole ownership of 4th place on the list for most Roland Garros victories in history.

All time win-loss at Roland Garros
Rafael Nadal                                   72-2
Roger Federer                                 65-16
Guillermo Vilas                                58-17
Novak Djokovic                             53-11
Ivan Lendl                                        53-12
Jaroslav Drobny                            53-14

•    The top seed has failed to reach the final here just once in the last 5 years – when Djokovic fell to Nadal in the 2013 semifinals.

•    By reaching his 8th Roland Garros semifinal, Djokovic has taken sole ownership of 2nd place on the list for most appearances in the last 4 here in the Open Era behind Rafael Nadal (9 Roland Garros semifinals). He has reached 9 US Open semifinals, 7 Wimbledon semifinals and 6 Australian Open semifinals.

•    Djokovic has reached his 6th consecutive Roland Garros semifinal and taken sole ownership of the record for most consecutive Roland Garros semifinal appearances reached in the Open Era ahead of Roger Federer (2005-09) and Rafael Nadal (2010-14), who each reached 5 consecutive semifinals here.

•    Roland Garros is the only Grand Slam title that Djokovic has not won. He has won 11 Grand Slam titles – at the Australian Open in 2008 (d. Jo-Wilfried Tsonga), 2011 (d. Andy Murray), 2012 (d. Nadal), 2013 (d. Murray), 2015
(d. Murray) and 2016 (d. Murray), Wimbledon in 2011 (d. Nadal), 2014 (d. Federer) and 2015 (d. Federer) and the US Open in 2011 (d. Nadal) and 2015 (d. Federer).

•    Djokovic is looking to become just the 8th man – and 2nd oldest – in history to complete the career Grand Slam after Andre Agassi, Don Budge, Roy Emerson, Federer, Rod Laver, Nadal and Fred Perry. He is one of 11 men to have collected 3 of the 4 major titles in the Open Era.
Career Grand Slam achievers
Player    Completed at…    Age^
Don Budge    1938 Roland Garros     22 years 357 days
Rod Laver    1962 US Open    24 years 32 days
Rafael Nadal    2010 US Open     24 years 101 days
Fred Perry    1935 Roland Garros    26 years 15 days
Roger Federer    2009 Roland Garros    27 years 203 days
Roy Emerson    1964 Wimbledon    27 years 244 days
Novak Djokovic    2016 Roland Garros??    29 years 14 days
Andre Agassi    1999 Roland Garros    29 years 38 days
^ Age as at the end of the tournament

•    Of the 7 men to possess a career Grand Slam, 4 of them ‘completed the set’ at Roland Garros: Perry in 1935, Budge in 1938, Agassi in 1999 and Federer in 2009.

•    By winning his round of 16 match here against Bautista Agut, Djokovic became the first player to surpass $100m in career prize money.

•    By defeating Darcis in the 2nd round, Djokovic recorded his 50th match-win at Roland Garros. He is one of just 3 players to have recorded 50 match-wins at each of the Grand Slams in the Open Era after Federer and Serena Williams. Djokovic has a 53-11 win-loss record here compared with 57-6 at the Australian Open, 52-8 at Wimbledon and 57-9 at the US Open.

•    Djokovic has a 5-2 win-loss record in 5-set matches at Roland Garros and a 28-8 Tour-level win-loss record in 5-set matches overall.

•    Last year here Djokovic reached his 3rd Roland Garros final (l. Wawrinka 46 64 63 64). He also reached the final here in 2012 and 2014, losing to Nadal on both occasions. Djokovic is making his 12th straight appearance at Roland Garros and his 46th consecutive appearance at a major.

•    Djokovic has played 3 clay court events in the lead up to this year’s Roland Garros. He won the title at Madrid-1000
(d. Murray), reached the final at Rome-1000 (l. Murray) and lost in the 2nd round at Monte Carlo-1000 (l. Jiri Vesely) – his earliest Tour-level defeat since losing to Grigor Dimitrov in the 2nd round at 2013 Madrid-1000.

•    Djokovic has won 5 titles so far this year. As well as winning at Madrid, he won Doha (d. Nadal), the Australian Open, Indian Wells-1000 (d. Milos Raonic) and Miami-1000 (d. Kei Nishikori) – to extend his streak of winning at least 2 titles every year since winning his first at 2006 Amersfoort (d. Nicolas Massu).

•    12 of Djokovic’s 64 career singles titles have come on clay, compared with 49 on hard court and 3 on grass.

•    Djokovic won his 2 singles rubbers to help Serbia defeat Kazakhstan 3-2 in March and reach the Davis Cup quarterfinals. Serbia will play Great Britain in Belgrade on 15-17 July.

•    Djokovic is coached by 3-time Roland Garros semifinalist Boris Becker. He has also been coached by Marian Vajda since June 2006. His wider team includes physios Miljan Amanovic and Gebhard Phil-Gritsch.

•    THIEM is bidding to become the 2nd Austrian player – man or woman – in history to reach a Grand Slam final. 1995 Roland Garros champion Thomas Muster is the only Austrian player to reach the last 2 at a major.

•    At 22 years 276 days, Thiem is bidding to become the youngest player to reach a Grand Slam final since Andy Murray (22 years 261 days) at the 2010 Australian Open. He would be the youngest player to reach the Roland Garros final since Rafael Nadal (22 years 5 days) in 2008.

•    By reaching the semifinals here, Thiem is projected to break in to the Top 10 for the first time at No. 7 when the new ATP rankings are released on Monday 6 June. If he wins the title here he will be No. 6.

•    Thiem is bidding to become the first No. 13 seed to reach a Grand Slam final since Alex Corretja finished runner-up here in 2001. The No. 13 seed has won the Roland Garros men’s singles title once in the Open Era – when Andre Agassi won here in 1999.

•    Thiem is looking to record his first victory over a world No. 1 player on his 4th attempt. The highest-ranked player he has defeated is No. 2 Roger Federer at 2016 Rome-1000. He has a 0-2 win-loss record against Top 10 players at the majors.

•    All 4 of Thiem’s victories against Top 10 players have come on clay. He has a 4-14 win-loss record against Top 10 players overall.

•    If Thiem reaches the Roland Garros final on his 3rd appearance here he would go into joint-11th place on the Open Era list for least appearances before reaching the last 2 here. Alberto Berasategui, Jim Courier, Juan Carlos Ferrero, Zeljko Franulovic, Andres Gimeno, Jan Kodes, Carlos Moya and Niki Pilic also reached their first Roland Garros final on their 3rd appearance here.

•    By reaching the semifinals here, Thiem has recorded his best Grand Slam result. His previous best result at a major was reaching the last 16 on his US Open debut in 2014 (l. Tomas Berdych). This is his 3rd straight Roland Garros appearance and his 10th Grand Slam overall.

•    By reaching the semifinals here, Thiem has recorded his best Roland Garros result. His previous best result here was reaching the 2nd round on his debut in 2014 (d. Paul-Henri Mathieu. l. Nadal) and in 2015 (d. Aljaz Bedene,
l. Pablo Cuevas).

•    Thiem is in 2nd place on the list for the most Tour-level match-wins in 2016, behind today’s opponent:

2016 Tour-level match-wins
Novak Djokovic    42-3
Dominic Thiem    41-10
Kei Nishikori    32-10
Rafael Nadal    29-8

•    Prior to coming here Thiem recorded his 100th career match-win in the final at Nice (d. Alexander Zverev). It was his 3rd title of the year having also triumphed at Buenos Aires (d. Nicolas Almagro) and Acapulco (d. Bernard Tomic). 5 of his 6 career singles titles have come on clay. He is one of 3 players to have won multiple clay court titles so far this year along with Cuevas and Nadal.

•    Thiem has won the most matches (25) on clay so far this season. As well as winning 2 titles on the surface, he also reached the final at Munich (l. Philipp Kohlschreiber), the semifinals at Rio de Janeiro (l. Guido Pella) and the 3rd round at Monte Carlo-1000 (l. Nadal). He lost in the 1st round at Madrid-1000 (l. Juan Martin del Potro).

•    Clay is Thiem’s best surface, with 59 of his 105 Tour-level victories coming on the surface. By contrast, he has a 44-39 win-loss record on hard courts and a 2-6 win-loss record on grass.

•    Thiem has a 2-2 win-loss record in 5-set matches with his most recent 5-set victory coming against Gastao Elias in Austria’s Davis Cup Europe/Africa Zone Group I tie against Portugal. He has never played a 5-set match here.

•    Thiem entered the men’s doubles event here with Dusan Lajovic. The pair lost to No. 12 seeds Radek Stepanek/Nenad Zimonjic 63 62 in the 1st round.

•    Thiem is a former junior world No. 2. He reached the boys’ singles final at Roland Garros as No. 14 seed in 2011, losing to Bjorn Fratangelo 36 63 86. As well as reaching the junior Roland Garros final, Thiem’s best junior result is winning the 2011 Orange Bowl.

•    Thiem joined the Austrian military as part of the country’s mandatory national service for 6 months from November 2014-April 2015, but continued to play on Tour during that time.

•    Thiem has been coached by Gunter Bresnik in Vienna since 2004. His physical trainer is Alex Stober.

NO. 2 ANDY MURRAY (GBR) v NO. 3 STAN WAWRINKA (SUI)

Head-to-head: Murray leads 8-7
2005    Davis Cup (WG-PO)    Clay (I)        R2    Wawrinka    63 76(5) 64
2006    AMS Miami        Hard (O)    R128    Wawrinka    75 36 64
2008    Doha            Hard (O)    FR    Murray        64 46 62
2008    Marseille        Hard (I)        R16    Murray        36 76(5) 61
2008    AMS Rome        Clay (O)    R32    Wawrinka    62 76(5)
2008    AMS Toronto        Hard (O)    R16    Murray        62 06 64
2008    US Open        Hard (O)    R16    Murray        61 63 63
2009    Wimbledon        Grass (O)    R16    Murray        26 63 63 57 63
2010    US Open        Hard (O)    R32    Wawrinka    67(3) 76(4) 63 63
2011    Shanghai-1000        Hard (O)    R16     Murray        64 36 63
2012    Olympic Tennis Event    Grass (O)    R64    Murray        63 63
2012    Tokyo            Hard (O)    QF    Murray        62 36 62
2013     Monte Carlo-1000    Clay (O)    R16    Wawrinka     61 62
2013    US Open        Hard (O)    QF    Wawrinka    64 63 62
2015    ATP World Tour Finals    Hard (I)        RR    Wawrinka    76(4) 64

A 16th career meeting between the 2 players and their 5th at a Grand Slam.

Murray has lost his last 3 meetings with Wawrinka, having not defeated the Swiss since 2012 Tokyo.

Wawrinka has won all 3 of their clay court meetings in straight sets, and dropped just 3 games in their most recent clay court meeting at 2013 Monte Carlo-1000.

Murray and Wawrinka have a 2-2 win-loss record against each other at the Grand Slams, though Wawrinka has won both of their last 2 meetings at a major.
Possible final head-to-heads
Djokovic     Thiem
Murray    10-23    2-0
Wawrinka    4-19    2-1

MURRAY    v    WAWRINKA

29    Age    31
6’3”/1.91m    Height    6’0”/1.83m
2    ATP Ranking    4
36    Titles    14
164-38    Career Grand Slam Record    111-42
2 titles     Best Grand Slam Result    2 titles
33-8    Roland Garros Record    32-10
579-170    Career Record    420-241
97-40    Career Record – Clay    161-78
27-5    2016 Record    27-7
17-2    2016 Record – Clay    12-3
22-7    Career Five-Set Record    23-19
9    Comebacks from 0-2 Down    6
165-102    Career Tiebreak Record    168-159
8-4    2016 Tiebreak Record    11-4

Road to the Semifinals
MURRAY    Time        Time    WAWRINKA
d. (Q) Radek Stepanek 36 36 60 63 75
d. (WC) Mathias Bourgue 62 26 46 62 63    3:41
3:34    1st round
2nd round    3:11
2:07    d. Lukas Rosol 46 61 36 63 64
d. Taro Daniel 76(7) 63 64
d. No. 27 Ivo Karlovic 61 64 76(3)    1:56    3rd round    1:59    d. No. 30 Jeremy Chardy 64 63 75
d.  No. 15 John Isner 76(9) 64 63
d. No. 9 Richard Gasquet 57 76(3) 60 62    2:40
3:24    Round of 16
Quarterfinals    2:56
1:56    d. No. 22 Viktor Troicki 76(5) 67(7) 63 62
d. Albert Ramos-Vinolas 62 61 76(7)

total time on court    15:15    (IBM time)    12:09    total time on court

•    MURRAY is attempting to become the first British man in the Open Era to reach the Roland Garros final. Only 2 British men have reached the final here since the event became international in 1925:

British men in the final of the French Championships (since 1925)
Year    Player    Final result
1935    Fred Perry    Defeated Gottfried von Cramm 63 36 61 63
1936    Fred Perry    Lost Gottfried von Cramm 60 26 62 26 60
1937    Bunny Austin    Lost to Henner Henkel 61 64 63

•    Murray is bidding to reach his 10th Grand Slam final and equal Fred Perry for the most appearances in a Grand Slam final by a British man (since the Challenge Round was abolished at Wimbledon in 1922):

Player    Appearances in a Grand Slam final
Fred Perry    10 – US Championships 1933-34, 1936, Australian Championships 1934-35, French Championships 1935-36, Wimbledon 1934-36
Andy Murray    9 – US Open 2008, 2012, Australian Open 2010-11, 2013, 2015-16, Wimbledon 2012-13

•    Murray is bidding to equal Boris Becker in 12th place on the list for the most Grand Slam finals reached in the Open Era with 10. Only 3 active players have reached more Grand Slam finals than Murray – Roger Federer (27), Rafael Nadal (20) and Novak Djokovic (19)* [*Djokovic is bidding to reach his 20th Grand Slam final here].

•    Murray is also bidding to reach the Roland Garros final for the first time and become the 10th man in the Open Era to reach the final at all 4 Grand Slam events. Djokovic is the last man to reach the final at all 4 Grand Slam events at 2012 Roland Garros. Murray would be the 3rd oldest to achieve the feat:

Age to complete the set of Grand Slam final appearances (Open Era)
Player    Completed at…    Age^
Jim Courier    1993 Wimbledon    22 years 321 days
Rafael Nadal    2010 US Open    24 years 101 days
Andre Agassi    1995 Australian Open    24 years 275 days
Roger Federer    2006 Roland Garros    24 years 307 days
Novak Djokovic    2012 Roland Garros    25 years 19 days
Stefan Edberg    1991 US Open    25 years 232 days
Ivan Lendl    1986 Wimbledon    26 years 121 days
Andy Murray??    2016 Roland Garros??    29 years 21 days??
Rod Laver*    1969 US Open    31 years 31 days
Ken Rosewall*    1971 Australian Open     36 years 73 days
^ Age as at the end of the tournament
* Also reached all 4 Slam finals in the pre-Open Era

•    Murray has reached his 19th Grand Slam semifinal and extended his record for the most Grand Slam semifinal appearances by a British man ahead of Fred Perry (13 semifinals). Murray has reached the semifinals at the Australian Open 6 times, Roland Garros 4 times, Wimbledon 6 times and the US Open 3 times.

•    Murray has a 0-3 win-loss record in semifinals here, compared with 2-1 at the US Open, 2-4 at Wimbledon and 5-1 at the Australian Open. He went on to reach the final after contesting his first semifinal at both the US Open and Australian Open, but lost in 3 Wimbledon semifinals before reaching the final in his 4th.

Murray’s Grand Slam semifinal appearances
Grand Slam    Opponent    Result
2008 US Open    Rafael Nadal    d. 62 76(5) 46 64
2009 Wimbledon    Andy Roddick    l. 64 46 76(7) 76(5)
2010 Australian Open    Marin Cilic    d. 36 64 64 62
2010 Wimbledon    Rafael Nadal    l. 64 76(6) 64
2011 Australian Open    David Ferrer    d. 46 76(2) 61 76(2)
2011 Roland Garros    Rafael Nadal    l. 64 75 64
2011 Wimbledon    Rafael Nadal    l. 57 62 62 64
2011 US Open    Rafael Nadal    l. 64 62 36 62
2012 Australian Open     Novak Djokovic    l. 63 36 67(4) 61 75
2012 Wimbledon    Jo-Wilfried Tsonga    d. 63 64 36 75
2012 US Open    Tomas Berdych    d. 57 62 61 76(7)
2013 Australian Open    Roger Federer    d. 64 67(5) 63 67(2) 62
2013 Wimbledon    Jerzy Janowicz    d. 67(2) 64 64 63
2014 Roland Garros    Rafael Nadal    l. 63 62 61
2015 Australian Open    Tomas Berdych    d. 67(6) 60 63 75
2015 Roland Garros    Novak Djokovic    l. 63 63 57 57 61
2015 Wimbledon    Roger Federer    l. 75 75 64
2016 Australian Open    Milos Raonic    d. 46 75 67(4) 64 62
2016 Roland Garros    v Stan Wawrinka    ??

•    Murray is bidding to record his 165th Grand Slam match-win today and close the gap on John McEnroe (167) in 9th place on the Open Era list for most victories at the majors. By reaching the semifinals here, Murray overtook Boris Becker (163) to take sole ownership of 10th place on the Open Era list.

•    Murray is bidding to end a 6-match losing streak against Top 4 opposition at the Grand Slams. He has not defeated a Top 4 opponent at a major since defeating No. 1 Djokovic in the final at 2013 Wimbledon. He has a 5-18 win-loss record against Top 4 opposition at the majors overall.

•    Murray is bidding to defeat a Top 4 player on clay for the 3rd time. He has a 2-10 win-loss record against Top 4 opposition on clay, with his only wins coming against No. 4 Nadal at 2015 Madrid-1000 and No. 1 Djokovic in the final at 2016 Rome-1000.

•    By reaching the semifinals here for the 4th time, Murray has moved into joint-8th place on the list for most Roland Garros semifinal appearances in the Open Era:

Most Roland Garros semifinal appearances (Open Era)
Rafael Nadal    9
Novak Djokovic    8
Roger Federer    7
Bjorn Borg
Mats Wilander    6
6
Andre Agassi
Ivan Lendl    5
5
Sergi Bruguera
Jimmy Connors
Jim Courier
Juan Carlos Ferrero
Andy Murray
Guillermo Vilas    4
4
4
4
4
4

•    By reaching the last 4 here, Murray has reached his 19th Grand Slam semifinal and moved into joint-8th place with Stefan Edberg and John McEnroe on the Open Era list for most Grand Slam semifinals reached. Federer (39 semifinals), Djokovic (30) and Nadal (23) are the only active players to reach the last 4 at a Grand Slam on more occasions than Murray.

•    Murray is the only British player – man or woman – to have reached 4 semifinals at Roland Garros. Murray is one of just 4 British players along with Fred Perry (1935-36), Bunny Austin (1935, 1937) and Ann Jones (1968-69) to reach multiple semifinals here.

•    Murray is bidding to extend his record for the most Roland Garros match-wins by a British man in history:
Most Roland Garros match-wins by a British man (all-time)
Player    Win-loss record
1.    Andy Murray    33-8
2.    Fred Perry    28-5
3.    Bunny Austin    23-6
4.    Patrick Hughes    21-6
5=   Billy Knight
Bobby Wilson    19-10
19-9

•    Murray has now reached the semifinals at 5 of the last 6 Grand Slam events he has contested since falling to Djokovic in the quarterfinals at the 2014 US Open. The only time he has failed to reach the last 4 at a major in that time was when he fell to Kevin Anderson in the round of 16 at the 2015 US Open.

•    Murray is bidding to record his 11th straight win and record his longest Tour-level winning streak on clay. He has won 10-match straight matches on clay, having won the title at Rome-1000 (d. Djokovic) prior to coming here – equalling his longest Tour-level winning streak on the surface. He also won 10 matches in a row in winning the titles at 2015 Munich and 2015 Madrid-1000 before conceding a walkover due to fatigue against David Goffin in the 2nd round at 2015 Rome-1000.

•    By defeating No. 1 Djokovic in the final at Rome-1000 prior to coming here, Murray ended a 6-match losing streak against Top 4 opposition. He has won just 4 of his last 23 matches against Top 4 opposition at Tour-level.

•    Murray has never played more than 2 five-set matches at the same Grand Slam event. As well as contesting 2 five-set matches here, Murray also contested 2 five-set matches at the 2005 US Open (d. Andrei Pavel in the 1st round, l. Arnaud Clement in the 2nd round) and at 2014 Roland Garros (d. Philipp Kohlschreiber in the 3rd round,
d. Gael Monfils in the quarterfinals).

•    Murray’s win over Stepanek in the 1st round was his 9th career comeback from 0-2 down – putting him in joint-3rd place on the Open Era list for the most 0-2 comebacks with Vitas Gerulaitis, Todd Martin and Roger Federer. Only Aaron Krickstein and Becker have achieved more 0-2 comebacks at Tour-level in the Open Era with 10.

•    Murray’s win over Bourgue was his 10th 5-set match-win in his last 11 five-set matches. His only 5-set defeat in that time came against Djokovic in the semifinals at 2015 Roland Garros. Murray has a 7-2 win-loss record in 5-set matches at Roland Garros and a 22-7 five set win-loss record overall.

•    It is the first time Murray has been extended to 5-sets in both his 1st and 2nd round matches at a Grand Slam. Gaston Gaudio in 2004 is the only man to have won the Roland Garros title having been extended to 5-sets in both his 1st and 2nd round matches in the Open Era.

•    By reaching the semifinals here, Murray has equalled his best Roland Garros performance. He also reached the semifinals here last year, when he lost to Djokovic 63 63 57 57 61 in a match that was played over 2 days due to rain, and fell to Nadal at this stage in both 2011 and 2014. This is his 9th Roland Garros appearance.

•    Murray is one of the 3 Grand Slam champions to reach the semifinals from the 5 who started the men’s main draw here. He became the first British male Grand Slam winner since Fred Perry won the 1936 US Open at the 2012 US Open (d. Djokovic), before becoming the first British man in 77 years to win the Wimbledon title in 2013 (d. Djokovic).

•    Murray is bidding to add to his US Open and Wimbledon titles and become the 16th man in the Open Era to win at least 3 of the 4 Grand Slam titles [see Preview page 2].

•    Murray warmed up for Roland Garros by winning the title at Rome-1000 and reaching the final at Madrid-1000
(l. Djokovic) and the semifinals at Monte Carlo-1000 (l. Nadal). Also in 2016 Murray reached his 5th Australian Open final, losing to Djokovic.

•    Murray plays here seeded No. 2 – his highest seeding at Roland Garros. He has now been seeded No. 2 at all 4 Grand Slam events.

•    Murray reached the semifinals of the boys’ singles as top seed at 2005 Roland Garros (l. Marin Cilic).

•    In March, Murray helped defending champions Great Britain reach the Davis Cup World Group quarterfinals for the 3rd year in a row. He won both of his singles matches in the first round tie against Japan in Birmingham, defeating Taro Daniel and Nishikori to help Great Britain defeat Japan 3-1. Great Britain plays Serbia in the quarterfinals in Belgrade on 15-17 July.

•    Murray is coached by former ATP pro Jamie Delgado.

•    Defending champion WAWRINKA is bidding to reach his 3rd Grand Slam final and his 2nd at Roland Garros.

•    Aged 31 years 69 days, Wawrinka is looking to become the oldest man to reach the final at Roland Garros since Niki Pilic finished runner-up here aged 33 years 280 days in 1973. Wawrinka is the oldest man to reach the semifinals at Roland Garros since Jimmy Connors reached the last 4 here aged 32 years 280 days in 1985.

•    By reaching the semifinals here, Roland Garros has become Wawrinka’s most successful Grand Slam in terms of matches won. He has a 32-10 win-loss record here, compared with 31-10 at the Australian Open, 17-11 at Wimbledon and 31-11 at the US Open.

•    Wawrinka is one of 3 Swiss players – men or women – to have reached a Grand Slam final in history alongside Roger Federer (27 Grand Slam finals) and Martina Hingis (12).

•    Wawrinka is bidding to record his 10th straight-win and record a new career-best Tour-level winning streak on clay. He also recorded 9 straight victories in winning the title at 2013 Oeiras through to the final at 2013 Madrid-1000, and in winning the title at 2015 Roland Garros through to the quarterfinals at 2016 Monte Carlo-1000. His career-best Tour-level winning streak is 13 matches (winning the title at 2014 Chennai through the round of 16 at 2014 Indian Wells-1000).

•    Wawrinka is bidding to become the first No. 3 seed to reach a Grand Slam final since No. 3 Rafael Nadal won the title here in 2013.

•    Wawrinka is bidding to record his 8th victory over a Top 2 opponent on his 43rd attempt. His most recent victory over a Top 2 player came against today’s opponent at the 2015 ATP World Tour Finals. He has a 4-8 win-loss record against Top 2 players at the Grand Slams, with his 4 victories occurring in his last 6 matches with them at the majors. He has won 2 of the 3 matches he has played against Top 2 opposition at Roland Garros.

•    Wawrinka, who won the junior title here in 2003, was also the first former boys’ champion to win the title here since Mats Wilander in 1988 and at 30 years 71 days was the oldest male champion since Andres Gomez in 1990. The last boys’ champion to win multiple titles at Roland Garros was Wilander, who won the men’s title here in 1982, 1985 and 1988.

•    Wawrinka, who won 2015 Roland Garros aged 30 years 71 days, is looking to become the 5th man in the Open Era to win 2 or more Grand Slams titles after turning 30. Andre Agassi was the last man to achieve the feat, winning the Australian Open in 2001 at 30 years, 274 days and again aged 32 years, 272 days in 2003.

•    Wawrinka is looking to become the 8th man in the Open Era to successfully defend the Roland Garros title. If he can retain his crown it will be the 17th time in the Open Era that the French Open title has been successfully defended [see Preview page 5].

•    Wawrinka has reached his 6th Grand Slam semifinal. Just 3 Swiss men have reached a Grand Slam semifinal in history – Federer (39), Wawrinka (6) and Marc Rosset (1).

•    Wawrinka’s 1st round win over Rosol improved his 5-set win-loss record to 23-19 and improved his 5-set win-loss record at Roland Garros to 8-2. By winning in 5 sets, Wawrinka avoided becoming the first defending Roland Garros champion to lose their opening match here since 1956 champion Lew Hoad fell in the 3rd round (after receiving 2 opening round byes) in 1957.

•    Wawrinka broke through to win his first Grand Slam title in his first Grand Slam final at the 2014 Australian Open
(d. Nadal 63 62 36 63). He was the first player to defeat the No. 1 and No. 2 seeds en route to a Grand Slam title since Sergei Bruguera won 1993 Roland Garros. He repeated the feat when winning 2015 Roland Garros.

•    Last year here Wawrinka won the title, defeating Novak Djokovic in 46 64 63 64 in the final. He was the first man to win Roland Garros a year after losing in the 1st round since 2002 champion Albert Costa, who had lost in the 1st round in Paris in 2001.

•    Wawrinka warmed up for Roland Garros by winning the title at Geneva (d. Marin Cilic). He also reached the quarterfinals at Monte Carlo-1000 (l. Nadal) and the 3rd round at Rome-1000 (l. Juan Monaco) but lost his opening match at Madrid-1000 (l. Nick Kyrgios).

•    Also in 2016, Wawrinka successfully defended his Chennai title (d. Borna Coric) and won Dubai (d. Marcos Baghdatis). He reached the round of 16 at the Australian Open, losing to Raonic.

•    Wawrinka has played in every major since making his Grand Slam debut at 2005 Roland Garros. This is his 12th straight Roland Garros appearance and his 45th consecutive Grand Slam appearance.

•    Wawrinka is coached by 2000 Roland Garros finalist Magnus Norman.

*All stats courtesy of the International Tennis Federation

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