May 28, 2016

Wimbledon Spring Press Conference – Prize Money Up by Five Percent

THE 130th CHAMPIONSHIPS, 2016 

Press information from The Championships, Wimbledon:(April 26, 2016) London, UK: The All England Club, Wimbledon, has today underlined its continuing commitment to the future of tennis with the announcement of increased investment in the players, integrity, the Master Plan and the enhanced grass court season.

Competitors at The Championships 2016 will receive £28.1m in total prize money, a 5% increase of £1.35m.  The singles champions will each receive £2.0m, a rise of 6.4% from £1.88m in 2015.  The staging of the first Wheelchair singles events at Wimbledon also introduces significant prize money increases for Wheelchair tennis players.

Wimbledon’s existing commitment to integrity in tennis and at The Championships will be further reinforced with investment in a number of additional measures, including stricter accreditation procedures, additional data provision, monitoring and analysis, increased education and support for players and officials, and increased anti-doping measures.

No.1 Court continues to be the current focus of the Wimbledon Master Plan. The project, which includes a new retractable roof, an extra 900 seats, a new public plaza in the place of Court 19 and new hospitality facilities, will be part-funded by the proceeds of the 2017-2021 No.1 Court debenture issue.

Following the successful addition of an extra week to the grass court season in 2015, the grass court season will be further enhanced in 2016 with the introduction of a WTA tournament in Mallorca.  2017 will see the re-introduction of a combined event at Eastbourne, a new combined event in Nottingham and more than double the amount of prize money, funded by the AELTC, for ATP Challenger and ITF Women’s Pro Circuit grass court events.

Philip Brook, Chairman of the AELTC, said: “Wimbledon is strongly committed to supporting the future of tennis through investment in players, in integrity, in our facilities and in the grass court season.”

THE CHAMPIONSHIPS 2016

For Competitors

Wheelchair Singles at Wimbledon 

Gentlemen’s Wheelchair Singles and Ladies’ Wheelchair Singles events will be held at Wimbledon for the first time. The eight-draw singles will start on 7 July, concluding with the Ladies’ Wheelchair Singles final on 9 July and the Gentlemen’s Wheelchair Singles final on 10 July.

Prize Money – click here for full details

Prize money will be a total of £28.1m, an increase of £1.35m (5%) on £26.75m in 2015. The Gentlemen’s and Ladies’ Singles Champions will each receive £2.0m, a 6.4% increase from £1.88m in 2015.

In the last five years the total prize money has increased from £14.6m in 2011 to £28.1m in 2016, with the singles champions’ prize money increasing to £2.0m from £1.1m.

Doubles continues to play an important role at The Championships and there is an average 3.1% increase in the Gentlemen’s and Ladies’ Doubles.  Total Wheelchair singles and doubles prize money will be £200,000, a significant increase on 2015.

Players’ services

The players’ website has been further enhanced to include personalised access to match videos and statistics, racket stringing and catering details. Wifi will be available in all courtesy cars.

30th Anniversary of the Last 8 Club

2016 marks the marks the 30th anniversary of the Last 8 Club, a concept founded by the All England Club. Membership celebrates the achievement of players who have reached the Gentlemen’s and Ladies’ Singles quarter-finals, the Gentlemen’s and Ladies’ Doubles semi-finals and the Mixed Doubles final.

Chairman’s Special Guests

The Chairman’s Special Guests will be Manolo Santana (50 years since winning in 1966), John McEnroe (35 years since winning in 1981), and Michael Stich (25 years since winning in 1991).

Operational

Security

The safety and security of all visitors to The Championships is of paramount importance. Throughout the year the AELTC has been working closely with the Metropolitan Police to ensure that The Championships will be as secure as possible and that security measures are comprehensive and proportionate with the threat level in the UK.   This will include extensive searches of the person, bags and vehicles on entry to the Grounds and Show Courts and the public are requested to help with entry procedures by checking the latest information on Wimbledon.com before travelling.

Integrity

The AELTC works closely with the ATP, WTA, ITF and Grand Slams as one of seven partners in the Tennis Integrity Unit (TIU).  In January 2016, the partners announced an Independent Review and have committed to implementing and funding all the recommendations of the review.  Pending publication of the findings, Wimbledon has invested in additional integrity measures for The Championships:

  • Accreditation procedures intensified: Increased communication to certify that all accredited individuals are fully informed that any form of gambling (defined as betting, assisting betting or the use/supply of information for betting on Championships’ tennis matches whether such activities are inside or outside the Grounds) on Wimbledon matches continues to be strictly prohibited under the terms and conditions of accreditation to The Championships.
  • Additional data security: Video images and two sources of data to be captured on all courts for all main events, including at Qualifying, to increase the ability of the TIU and betting operators to prevent potential opportunities for corruption caused by time delays and for any discrepancies to be reviewed.
  • Increased data monitoring: Working with IBM, the TIU and the betting industry to monitor and analyse match data, betting data and odds data in the event of a discrepancy or a betting alert, while noting that a betting alert on its own is not proof or even evidence of match-fixing. If analysis does suggest corrupt activity, the TIU will open an investigation. Where appropriate, every effort will be made to communicate the occurrence of and reasons behind any alerts to the media. There were no betting alerts at The Championships 2015.
  • Increased education and support: Verifying that all officials and players have undergone the Tennis Integrity Protection Programme (TIPP) programme, the TIU’s interactive online Q&A system designed to familiarise players with tennis’s anti-corruption rules and the tactics typically employed by would-be corruptors. Players, officials and key stakeholders also to be made aware of additional resources for reporting of any suspicious activity.
  • Enhanced anti-doping provision: The AELTC is one of the partners in the Tennis Anti-Doping Programme (TADP), which is administered and enforced by the ITF. Anti-doping testing is carried out independently of the tournament organisers in accordance with the provisions of the WADA Code and the 2016 TADP. In addition to the TADP In-Competition testing, the AELTC will be implementing additional anti-doping measures for The Championships 2016, the details of which are required to remain confidential.

Richard Lewis, Chief Executive of the AELTC, said: “Our increased investment in promoting integrity in light of the recent focus on these areas underlines our determination for Wimbledon to play its part in safeguarding the integrity of tennis and securing the public’s faith in our sport.”

Grounds / Courts

In line with one of the objectives of the Master Plan to increase the overall number of unreserved seats around the Grounds, additional seats have been re-allocated so that three-quarters of No.3 Court is now available to Grounds’ ticket holders. The Grounds capacity remains at 39,000 people with the daily maximum depending on the number of courts in play and the weather conditions.

Press Centre

Following a successful trial period, all 360 writing desks in the Press Centre have been fitted with interactive touch screens, incorporating the Wimbledon Information System to deliver scores, video and statistics to journalists at their desks. The Press Centre has also been fitted with new chairs.

Commercial & Media

Broadcast
Announced last September, the AELTC and the BBC have agreed a three-year extension to the current UK broadcast contract for The Championships, giving the BBC the rights up to 2020 (inclusive).  Other recent new agreements include BeIN Sport to broadcast The Championships in the Middle East, LeTV as the digital broadcaster and regional distributor in China, and Discovery / Eurosport in Russia.

Official Suppliers

Häagen-Dazs rejoins the AELTC’s Official Suppliers as the Official Ice Cream of The Championships.  Ralph Lauren, Official Outfitter to The Championships, will be unveiling a new uniform for Officials and Ball Boys and Girls on 5 May.

Retail

The AELTC is proud to release its first owned collection of apparel and accessories collection. Designed, sourced and merchandised in-house, the collection is available now in the Wimbledon Shops.

Digital

Wimbledon continues to expand its award-winning digital footprint with the introduction of a new app for Apple TV, taking Wimbledon platforms into the home, and a completely new app for mobile and tablet on iOS and Android. The new app offers a bespoke experience for the visitor onsite, while also continuing to provide an unparalleled experience for those around the world. Further details will be released in June.

Wimbledon and the Community

Wimbledon Lawn Tennis Museum

A new exhibition, ‘Reinventing the Racket’, explores developments in tennis racket design from the 1870s onwards, including the Museum Collection’s largest racket (2.7m long) and smallest (about 10cm long) and a wide variety of tennis racket themed objects. The Museum is also proud to host the latest in the AELTC’s exploration of Virtual Reality with a new experience that allows the visitor to immerse themselves in Wimbledon’s unique traditions.

The Museum has acquired Michael Cole’s tennis photographic collection, featuring over half a million colour and black and white images from the Grand Slams from 1945-2015, and adding to Wimbledon Lawn Tennis Museum’s reputation as the world’s leading tennis historical archive.

Wimbledon Foundation, the WJTI and Road to Wimbledon

The Wimbledon Foundation, which committed £625,000 to local community projects in 2015, was proud to launch the ‘Get Set Get Active Fund’ in March 2016, the third of its grant-making funds for the local community.  More information, including the Foundation’s 2015 annual review, is available at wimbledon.com/foundation.

The Foundation, the AELTC and The Championships are also pleased to be opening six new courts (3 indoor, 3 outdoor) at Raynes Park for use by the Wimbledon Junior Tennis Initiative and Ball Boy and Ball Girl training.

The Road to Wimbledon, the AELTC’s junior tournament for 14&U, will be visiting China for the first time, joining the events run in India for the past three years. Both Indian and Chinese players will have the opportunity to qualify to join the UK finalists at the National Finals at the AELTC in August.

Championships’ Sculpture

William Pye, the internationally renowned sculptor, has been commissioned to create a contemporary work of art to represent The Championships. The bronze water sculpture, entitled ‘Alchemilla’, will be unveiled by HRH The Duke of Kent, the Club’s President, on the opening day of The Championships.

FUTURE DEVELOPMENTS

No.1 Court and Wimbledon Master Plan

Detailed design work for No.1 Court has been completed and various preparatory works have been undertaken to facilitate the construction that will start in earnest in July 2016 with the removal of the existing fixed roof. There will be no roof in 2017. The project, scheduled for completion in 2019, includes a new retractable roof, an extra 900 seats, a new public plaza in the place of Court 19 and new hospitality facilities. Sir Robert McAlpine has been appointed as the main contractor.

No.1 Court Debenture Issue, 2017-2021

The prospectus for the No.1 Court Debenture issue 2017-2021 was published on 22 April.  Up to 1,000 debentures are being offered at a price of £31,000 (inc VAT) per debenture.  Applications close on 27 May 2016 and the issue is expected to raise £25m net of expenses, all of which will be invested in the improvements to the Grounds and facilities under the Wimbledon Master Plan.

Enhanced grass court season

An artist's impression of the redeveloped No.1 Court
An artist’s impression of the redeveloped No.1 Court

The AELTC was delighted with the first year of an enhanced grass court season in 2015, which provided players with more opportunities to practise and compete on grass ahead of The Championships. The grass court season will be further augmented in 2016 with the introduction of a WTA tournament in Mallorca, and in 2017 with the re-introduction of a combined event at Eastbourne, a new combined event in Nottingham and more than double the amount of prize money, funded by the AELTC, for ATP Challenger and ITF Women’s Pro Circuit grass court events.

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Novak Djokovic Tops Roger Federer for Third Wimbledon Title and Ninth Major

(July 12, 2015) Novak Djokovic defended last year’s Wimbledon title with a 7-6(1), 6-7(10), 6-4, 6-3 victory over Roger Federer for his third Wimbledon crown, ninth major title, sixth tournament win of the year and 54th overall career title. He’s the first man since Federer, to defend his Wimbledon title. The Serbian, world No 1 has evened his head-to-head record against the Swiss at 20-20.

The win for the 28-year-old prevented the seven-time champion, 34-year-old Federer from claiming a record eighth crown at the All-England Club.

Djokovic is now tied with his coach Boris Becker with three Wimbledon titles.

It was Djokovic’s 200th Grand Slam match win and he is now in eighth place overall on the all-time Grand Slam winners list with nine majors.

“It’s a great privilege to play against Roger, who is a great champion,” Djokovic said to BBC television after the match. “He has done so much for our sport on and off the court. It’s a great honor to play him again. I was aware coming onto the court, that Roger would play his best when it matters the most. He pushes you to limits.”

“Novak not only played great today, but also this year, last year and the year before that!” Federer said. “Well done, Novak, you deserved it. At the end he was rock solid. I didn’t play bad myself, so I can be very happy. That’s the way it goes. Once more, it has been a privilege to play here.”

Federer went up a break in the first set only to be broken right back. At 5-6 Djokovic saved to set points and went on a run where he won 14 of 15 points. Djokovic dominated the tiebreak 7-1.

In the second set, Djokovic had 7 set points and failed to close it out, with Federer edging out the Serb in the second set tiebreak 12-10.

Djokovic took away Federer’s momentum in the third set breaking the Swiss’ serve in the third game and held on to win the third set 6-4. The set was interrupted for a rain delay at 3-2.

Djokovic broke Federer’s serve in the fifth game of the fourth set and again in the ninth game to close out the set (6-3) and the match.

“It was always going to be tough for both players to start the first set, second set and third set,” Federer said.  “It’s always a mental and physical challenge to keep going, keep going.

“We both I think had chances.  I don’t remember quite how it went.  I think it went back and forth.  I saved a couple of breakpoints early which I think was big for me to stay with him. Then I think I had chances myself maybe. Then he got the break on a forehand I should not miss.

“It was a different atmosphere then.  Also from the crowd.  Everything went into the breaker.  You slowly got to build it up in the beginning of the third.

“But definitely were a few games where it was close for both guys.  Maybe at the end the key of the match, but who knows.

“Yeah, definitely would have been nice to stay with him there at that point or even go a break ahead.”

“Second set tiebreak,” Djokovic said, “it was frustrating obviously not to be able to close it out.  Very, very frustrated on the changeover because I knew that I cannot let this happen against Roger in the finals of Wimbledon because this might be my last chance in the match.

“But, again, managed to regroup, had a little bit more time, especially in the rain delay.  That’s where I got my thoughts together and went back to the basics and played a really, really good match after that.”

Reflecting on his accomplishments, Djokovic said: “I think there is no reason not to be satisfied with what I have achieved.  In contrary, I’m thrilled and very proud with all the success that I had so far in the career, everything I reached.  If you would ask me as a 14‑year‑old back in Serbia trying to find my way, you know, that this is how I’m going to end up at 28, of course I would sign the deal and take it right away.

“There were a couple of Grand Slam finals that I think I could have won. But, again, having said that, everything happens for a reason.  I try to learn from every experience, especially the ones that don’t end up victorious for me.  I’m going to keep going.

“I’m 28.  I feel good. I don’t feel old.  I have hopefully many more years in front of me.  I’m going to try to push my own limits and see how far I can go really with titles and with myself playing on this high level.”

Asked about Djokovic’s position among the tennis greats, Federer said: “Moving up. We don’t know who is what, all these things.  But he’s clearly making a big name for himself, you know, having won as many times now as he has in these different slams.  But also his streak at world No. 3, 2, 1, keeping it up, keeping it going, winning a lot of titles time and time again.

“Staying injury‑free now for him is crucial.  Clearly he’s going to be one of the top guys.  Where, we’ll still have to wait and see.  I’m sure he still has many more great years ahead of him.”

“I’m extremely proud,” Djokovic said.  “It’s a huge relief.  That’s the first feeling that I will feel after the tournament.  Whether I’m winning it or losing it, in finals, or whenever I finish, it’s just a huge relief.

“Especially in the Grand Slams, you know, you play every second day, but you have to encounter many different things on and off the court.  It’s biggest events in sport.  So many people asking you different questions.  There’s expectations from yourself, your team, people around you.

“Yeah, you know, you need to be able to accept it and live with that.  It’s not easy because it takes a lot of energy from you and from every aspect. So that’s the first thing, is a relief, it’s over.

“And obviously it’s nicer when you get to have the trophy with it, as well.

 

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Novak Djokovic and Roger Federer Reach Wimbledon Final with Straight Set Victories

228 Federer Djokovic-001

(July 10, 2015)

It will be a repeat of last year’s Wimbledon Gentlemen’s final on Sunday when No. 1 Novak Djokovic faces No. 2 Roger Federer. Both men had straight set wins in their respective semifinals on Friday.

Two-time winner Djokovic defeated No. 21 seed Richard Gasquet 7-6(2), 6-4, 6-4 to book a spot in his fourth Wimbledon final and his 17th major championship final. Seven-time Wimbledon titlist Federer bested 2013 champion Andy Murray 7-5, 7-5, 6-4.

“The first set was really close,” said Djokovic who played the first semifinal of the day. “I thought Richard played some really good tennis, especially from the backhand side. It was really difficult for me at times to play any kind of ball to his backhand side because he was really going for it, especially down the line. He made a lot of winners. He used the chipped backhand, slice variety as well.”

“Winning the first set tiebreak was psychologically very helpful for the rest of the match.”

“I tried to do my best,” Gasquet said.  “I did a good first set.  I did some great backhand.

“But, of course, I would like to do a little bit better then after that.  I tried to be aggressive.  I try my best.  I did a good match.  It was tough to do better.  Sometimes I did mistakes in the tiebreak, of course.  Some backhand I could put on the court.

“It was 2‑All, then it was 7‑2 very fast after that.  It wasn’t good.  He never miss on some returns.  He serves well.  That’s why he’s No. 1 in the world.”

The second semifinal of the day provided stunning hitting and rallies of the highest quality by both players. Despite the straight-set score the match was extremely close.

“Andy’s been playing very well for the season,” Federer said to the BBC after the match. “There is so much expectation riding on the match. I’m unbelievably happy. I played so well in the biggest occasion today.

“I’ve been serving very well for the entire tournament. I wasn’t broken against one of the best returners. I kept the pressure up and went for my shots. I mixed it up like I usually do and kept pushing forward and staying focused. It all worked out really well.”

“He served fantastic, apart from the first game where I had the chance there,” Murray said. “Didn’t really have any opportunities. Then, you know, that puts pressure on you.”

“Obviously I got broken right at the end all of the sets. But I didn’t actually play a bad match. Played pretty well.”

“Today I was clearly able to play very well from the start,” Federer elaborated.  “The beginning was always going to be an important part of the game.  I had to save breakpoint first, then I was able to start rolling on my serve.  Played a great game to break.

“So, I mean, definitely one of the best matches I’ve played in my career.  I don’t know, the first set, I don’t remember point by point, but it was definitely really, really solid.”

 

The win puts the Swiss in his 10th final at the All-England Club, 26th Grand Slam final, which will make him the oldest finalist at 33, since 39-year-old Ken Rosewall in 1974. He is seeking a record 8th Wimbledon title and 18th major.

“Doesn’t matter whether it’s No. 8 or No. 1,” Federer said, “Wimbledon finals is always a big occasion.”

Federer on playing Djokovic in the final: “Well, I mean, it’s great to play Novak anywhere these days, you know, because he’s a great player.  He’s had great success, unbelievable success actually, throughout his career.  But especially now the last few years, he’s been unbelievably dominant, especially on the hard courts, then he improved on the grass.  On the clay, he’s one of the best, if not the best.

“He’s become very match‑tough.  He always shows up.  It’s tough to beat him.  You know, he’s been very injury‑free.  He’s been good for the game.

“For me, I don’t really think about the match we played against each other last year.  I just remember it was unbelievably thrilling.  The crowd really got into it.

“I’m just happy personally for myself to be back in a finals.  Whoever that’s going to be against, it’s always a big occasion.  That is Novak, the world No. 1, it obviously adds something extra.”

“I need to keep it up for one more match,” Federer said, “to really make it the perfect couple of weeks.”

The Serb, who comes into the final as the defending champion, will be playing in his fourth Wimbledon final.

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Djokovic, Federer and Murray Advance to Wimbledon Semis, Wawrinka Knocked out in Five Sets by Gasquet

 

(June 8, 2015) Top three seeds Novak Djokovic, Roger Federer and Andy Murray reach the semifinals of Wimbledon easily on Wednesday with straight set wins. Richard Gasquet spoiled a potential “top four” party in the last four, when he upset No. 4 Stan Wawrinka in five sets 6-4, 4-6, 3-6, 6-4, 11-9.

For the Frenchman, this will be his third major semifinal. “I’m the worst,” Gasquet said with a grin, “when you see Federer, Djokovic and Murray and me. There is something, I want to enjoy it.”

Gasquet will face off against Djokovic, who reached his 27 Grand Slam semifinal, defeating U.S. Open champion Marin Cilic 6-4, 6-4, 6-4. It was the world No. 1’s 650th win on tour and 50th at Wimbledon.

“I came out with the right intensity, moved well all over the court, tried to get as many returns back in play,” said Djokovic. “I didn’t allow Marin to come back to the match. It was a close game when I was serving for the set. I think that helped my confidence to feel better afterwards.”

“It was great to watch them go backhand-to-backhand today,” said Djokovic about the Wawrinka – Gasquet match. “Some great points, great exchanges.”

Djokovic discussing his match-up against Gasquet said, “the experience of being in these final stages of Wimbledon many times is going to help me.” The Serb is 11-1 against Gasquet.

Andy Murray reached his 150th match won at a Grand Slam on Wednesday when he stopped Canadian Vasek Pospisil 6-4, 7-5, 6-4. For the Canadian Posposil, it was his first appearance in a major quarterfinal.

Murray said of the win: “I needed to (step up) because at times, (he) was serving really well, (which) made it very difficult for me. Then I just managed to, at a few key moments, come up with some good shots. Third set was tricky, as well, because I had a bunch of break points. When you don’t take them, obviously you start to think about that a little bit. Overall, it was a good match.”

 

Murray will face Roger Federer for place in the final. Federer bested Gilles Simon, the 12th seed 6-3, 7-5, 6-2 to reach his 10th Wimbledon semifinal and 37th major semifinal overall, to keep his hopes of winning a record eighth title at the All-England Club alive.

Federer won his last major at Wimbledon in 2012 when he defeated Murray, but then about a month later, Murray defeated Federer for the gold medal at the London 2012 Olympics.

“We both like to look back at that summer,” said Federer. “Me, not so much at the Olympics; him, probably not so much at Wimbledon.”

Federer is 12-11 against Murray and is 9-0 in Wimbledon semifinals.

“I’m very happy to be in the semis again,” said Federer. “The road is long getting here. But still I feel like I’m fresh and I’ve got energy left in the tank for hopefully a great match with Andy and then we’ll see. But I’m looking forward to it.

“It’s been good so far. I felt like I played a very solid last year or so, especially on the grass I’ve done very well. I’m happy to keep it up here now. This is obviously now crunch time when you want to show if your game’s really up to par.”

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Jelena Jankovic Upsets Defending Champion Petra Kvitova at Wimbledon

Jelena Jankovic

Jelena Jankovic

 

(July 4, 2015) Former No. 1, 28th seed Jelena Jankovic pulled off the biggest upset of the Wimbledon fortnight on the Ladies’ side when she defeated No. 2 and defending champion Petra Kvitova 3-6, 7-5, 6-4.

The Czech looked to be confidently cruising past the Serbian, with a 6-3, 4-2 lead, but Jankovic turned the match around from that point onward.

“Playing on grass is very difficult for me. It does not come natural,” Jankovic said. “I just tried to stay one point at a time, just hang in there, stay positive and fight, and I made it. But playing on Centre Court against the defending champion was just unbelievable. I’m really really happy to win this match!”

“I’m overwhelmed. I’m so excited. My heart is still pumping,” Jankovic said after the match.

“It didn’t matter how badly I was playing or what was happening out there, I really just tried to stay one point at a time and fight, and when I won that second set I knew I just had to keep going out there.

“When I won, I couldn’t believe what just happened. I lost to Petra the last time we played in Rome, and I know she plays amazing here. But that’s what this sport is all about. It’s such a great excitement for me – I’m so glad I was able to win and this gives me a lot of confidence the rest of the tournament.”

For Kvitova who also won Wimbledon in 2011, this was her earliest exit from the All-England Club since 2009.

“I’m not really sure what happened out there,” Kvitova said in press. “Suddenly I felt like she’s coming back, playing a little bit aggressive.

“Suddenly from my side, I didn’t have answer for it. My serve didn’t help me at all this time, as well. I was really struggling with each shot which I played.”

“But I don’t think that I lost today because I was defending champion from last year,” Kvitova said.  “I don’t think is really the thing why.

“I think that she really played a good match.  Looked a little bit on the other side when I played Venus last year, when I was the worst player in the first two sets, then I won.  This time just turn the other side for her.”

“Here I am in the fourth round, in the second week of Wimbledon,” Jankovic said.  “I just beat a defending champion.  I mean, it’s unbelievable.  You know, I don’t think I can ask for more.  I hope to keep going.”

“I think I always believe in myself, no matter what.  Like I said, if I’m healthy, if I can put that work in on a daily basis and work hard, improve.

“You know, to be honest, right now I’m not at the level I want to be at. First of all, physically I have to get a lot stronger a lot faster.  As I said before, getting injured, not being able to go to the gym, to spend some time on the practice court.  I will need some time to get to the form, to the level I want to be at, and where I can be. That’s what will satisfy my, you know, needs and wishes.

“So we’ll see.  I always think I can do it.  I’m not old. I’m still young at heart.  I look pretty good, so why not (laughter)?  I mean, give me a break, guys.  What’s old?”

“I’m very determined.  Like I said, I want to get, you know, to where I think I belong.  I’ve done it in the past.  I’ve been many years in the top 10, I’ve been No. 1 in the world, I’ve played against all these players.

“Like I said, just if I’m able to work hard and believe in myself, hopefully my time will come again.”

Other winners on the Ladies’ side included fifth seed Caroline Wozniacki over Camila Giorgi 6-2, 6-2, No. 20 Garbine Muguruza dismissed 2012 semifinalist Angelique Kerber 7-6 (12), 1-6, 6-2, No. 13 Agnieszka Radwanska, No. 15 Timea Bacsinszky, No. 21 Madison Keys, Olga Govortsova and Monica Niculescu also advanced.

Seven-time Wimbledon winner Roger Federer dropped a set to advance to the round of 16 beating hard-hitting Sam Groth 6-4, 6-4, 6-7 (5), 6-2.

Groth hit the second fastest serve in Wimbledon history – 147 mph.

No. 3 Andy Murray beat No. 25 Andreas Seppi of Italy 6-2, 6-2, 1-6, 6-1.  Seppi received a visit from a trainer to work on his lower right leg, and won the next six game. Murray also received a medical time out for a stiff right shoulder after trailing 1-0 in the fourth set, and then took next six game to win the match.

Dustin Brown, the qualifier who upset Rafael Nadal, lost his very next match to 22nd seed Viktor Troicki 6-4, 7-6 (3), 4-6, 6-3.

“Obviously having the pleasure and being able to play on Centre Court and then to play a match like that (on Thursday), doesn’t make a difference if I lost today or not, no one will ever be able to take that away from me,” said Brown.

“I think I played well and I wouldn’t compare it to any other matches.  That’s what I said after winning against (Rendy) Lu, and Rafa (Nadal), it’s always a totally different match.  I’m happy with my tournament.  When I came to quallies, someone would have said sign here for beating Rafa, making second round and qualifying, I would have signed that paper.”

Completing a match held over from Friday at 10-10 in the fifth due to darkness, Marin Cilic bested John Isner 7-6 (4), 6-7 (6), 6-4, 6-7 (4), 12-10

Also Saturday, Wimbledon’s marathon man fell short this time. John Isner, the American who won the longest tennis match in history in 2010, lost 12-10 in the fifth set to U.S. Open champion Marin Cilic. The Croat beat Isner 7-6 (4), 6-7 (6), 6-4, 6-7 (4), 12-10 in a match that resumed Saturday at 10-10.

“Marathon man” Isner defeated Nicolas Mahut 70-68 in the fifth set at Wimbledon in 2010, the longest match in tennis history.

No. 12 seed Gilles Simon defeated French countryman No. 18 seed Gael Monfils in five sets, in a match which had to be moved from
Court 1  when darkness came early in the fourth set, and completed under the roof of Centre Court.

Other men moving in to the fourth round: Vasek Pospisil, No. 23 Ivo Karlovic and No. 20 Roberto Bautista Agut.


Ladies Singles – Third Round

(28) Jelena Jankovic (SRB) d. (2) Petra Kvitova (CZE) 36 75 64
(5) Caroline Wozniacki (DEN) d. (31) Camila Giorgi (ITA) 62 62
(20) Garbine Muguruza (ESP) d. (10) Angelique Kerber (GER) 76(12) 16 62
(13) Agnieszka Radwanska (POL) d. Casey Dellacqua (AUS)
(15) Timea Bacsinszky (SUI) d. (18) Sabine Lisicki (GER) 63 62
(21) Madison Keys (USA) d. Tatjana Maria (GER) 64 64
(Q) Olga Govortsova (BLR) d. Magdalena Rybarikova (SVK) 76(4) 63
Monica Niculescu (ROU) d. Krystina Pliskova (CZE) 63 75

Gentlemen’s Singles

Third Round – Third Round

[2] Roger Federer (SUI) d. Sam Groth (AUS) 64 64 67(5) 62
[3] Andy Murray (GBR) d. [25] Andreas Seppi (ITA) 62 62 16 61
[6] Tomas Berdych (CZE) d. Pablo Andujar (ESP) 46 60 63 76(3)
[9] Marin Cilic (CRO) d. [17] John Isner (USA) 76(4) 67(6) 64 67(4) 12-10
[12] Gilles Simon (FRA) vs. [18] Gael Monfils (FRA)
[23] Ivo Karlovic (CRO) d. [13] Jo-Wilfried Tsonga (FRA) 76(3) 46 76(2) 76(9)
[20] Roberto Bautista Agut (ESP) d. Nikoloz Basilashvili (GEO) 76(4) 61 60
[22] Viktor Troicki (SRB) d. Dustin Brown (GER) 64 76(3) 46 63
Vasek Pospisil (CAN) d. James Ward (GBR) 64 36 26 63 86

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Federer, Murray and Kvitova Have Easy Wins to Move into Third Round at Wimbledon

 

(July 2, 2015) Roger Federer won his 75th match at Wimbledon while Andy Murray also won in straight sets to advance to the third round of Wimbledon on Thursday.

Roger Federer going for an eighth title at the All-England Club, defeated American Sam Querrey 6-4, 6-2, 6-2. The Swiss is second behind Jimmy Connors (84) for most wins at Wimbledon in the Open Era.

The highlight of the match came when Federer hit a “tweener” lob over Querrey’s head leading 4-2 in the second set.

“It’s rare that it happens, so when you get them you’ve got to pull it off,” Federer said.

“It all happens very quickly.  I can’t put it on super slow and go, All right, what’s best?  ‘Cause I guess so many things shoot through your mind like, Well, what’s the score?  Is it 30‑Love?  Is it Love‑30?  Love‑30, I wouldn’t have hit a shot like that, no chance.  I probably would have adjusted, changed my grip and tried to hit a normal forehand or gone around and hit a normal backhand.

 

“What the situation was, I had the grip in hand.  It was an open grip, you know, one for a slice I would think, or one you scoop it.  But then I was like I feel better almost shuffling my feet and giving myself, with the right grip, without changing that anymore, to hitting a lob.

 

“Easiest way for me was somehow through the legs rather than coming to a complete standstill and then hitting a lob, which he would have seen where it was going to go.  Through the legs, you’re not sure if it’s going to come short or high.  I got lucky.  I hit it perfect.

 

“Yeah, I felt like there was a chance, legitimate chance, to win the point.  And it was fun.  It just happened to be the right thing.  I picked the right side.  Like I said, I got lucky also to be there.”

 

Third seed Murray is making a bid for his second Wimbledon title made easy work of Robin Haase 6-1, 6-1, 6-4,.

 

Her Royal Highness, The Duchess of Cornwall was given one of Murray’s wristbands at the end of the by Richard Lewis, the chief executive officer of The Championships who caught the wrists bands.

 

“I heard that she was coming today,” Murray said.  “I saw her briefly after the match.

 

“But the wristband actually hit the chairman of Wimbledon.  He was there with her.  Normally you see who catches it.  Then the Duchess opened up her bag and my wristband was in there, so he obviously had given it to her.”

 

Another former champion had an easy day on Thursday and that was defending champion Petra Kvitova. She dismantled Kurumi Nara of Japan 6-2, 6-0. The world No. 2 has dropped only three games in the tournament.

 

“It wasn’t really easy,” Kvitova said.  “I mean, of course, the score look very easy.  But few games which we play was really close.

 

“I’m just glad that I won.  That’s important, you know, counting is the last point.  I still have a lot of space where I can improve for the next match. That’s a good sign, as well.

 

“Of course, the next match will be tough again, and tougher and tougher, if I’m going to stay in the tournament.  I have to be prepared for everything.”

 

There were upsets on the Ladies’ side of the draw on day four of Wimbledon. Eighth seed Ekaterina Makarova lost to Magdalena Rybarikova, 6-2, 7-5, Svetlana Kuznetsova lost 3-6, 6-3, 6-4 to Kristyna Pliskova,  No.17 seed Elina Svitolina fell to Casey Dellacqua, 7-6(3), 6-3,  and No.25 seed Alizé Cornet was osted by Belarusian qualifier Olga Govortsova, 7-6(6), 2-6, 6-1.

Seeded winners on the day included: No.5 seed Caroline Wozniacki, No.10 seed Angelique Kerber, No.13 seed Agnieszka Radwanska, No.15 seed Timea Bacsinszky, No.18 seed Sabine Lisicki, No.20 seed Garbiñe Muguruza, No.21 seed Madison Keys, No.28 seed Jelena Jankovic and No.31 seed Camila Giorgi.

 


Ladies’ Singles – Second Round

(2) Petra Kvitova (CZE) d. Kurumi Nara (JPN) 62 60
(5) Caroline Wozniacki (DEN) d. Denisa Allertova (CZE) 61 76(6)
Magdalena Rybarikova (SVK) d. (8) Ekaterina Makarova (RUS) 62 75
(10) Angelique Kerber (GER) d. Anastasia Pavlyuchenkova (RUS) 75 62
(13) Agnieszka Radwanska (POL) d. Ajla Tomljanovic (AUS) 60 62
(15) Timea Bacsinszky (SUI) d. Silvia Soler-Espinosa (ESP) 62 61
Casey Dellacqua (AUS) d. (17) Elina Svitolina (UKR) 76(3) 63
(18) Sabine Lisicki (GER) d. Christina McHale (USA) 26 75 61
(20) Garbine Muguruza (ESP) d. Mirjana Lucic-Baroni (CRO) 63 46 62
(21) Madison Keys (USA) d. Elizaveta Kulichkova (RUS) 64 64
(Q) Olga Govortsova (BLR) d. (25) Alize Cornet (FRA) 76(6) 26 61
Krystina Pliskova (CZE) d. (26) Svetlana Kuznetsova (RUS) 36 63 64
(28) Jelena Jankovic (SRB) d. Evgeniya Rodina (RUS) 67(4) 61 63
(31) Camila Giorgi (ITA) d. Lara Arruabarrena (ESP) 60 76(5)
Monica Niculescu (ROU) d. Jana Cepelova (SVK) 63 63
Tatjana Maria (GER) d (Q) Ying-Ying Duan (CHN) 16 62 108

Gentlemen’s Singles – Second Round

[2] Roger Federer (SUI) d. Sam Querrey (USA) 64 62 62
[3] Andy Murray (GBR) d. Robin Haase (NED) 61 61 64
[6] Tomas Berdych (CZE) d. Nicolas Mahut (FRA) 61 64 64
Dustin Brown (GER) d. [10] Rafael Nadal (ESP) 75 36 64 64
[12] Gilles Simon (FRA) d. Blaz Kavcic (SLO) 61 61 67(5) 61
[13] Jo-Wilfried Tsonga (FRA) d. Albert Ramos-Vinolas (ESP) 63 64 64
Nikoloz Basilashvili (GEO) d. [15] Feliciano Lopez (ESP) 75 36 63 26 64
[18] Gael Monfils (FRA) d. Adrian Mannarino (FRA) 76(5) 63 75
[20] Roberto Bautista-Agut (ESP) d. Benoit Paire (FRA) 26 46 63 63 63
[22] Viktor Troicki (SRB) d. Aljaz Bedene (GBR) 64 36 62 64
[23] Ivo Karlovic (CRO) d. Alexandr Dolgopolov (UKR) 57 63 64 67(4) 13-11
[25] Andreas Seppi (ITA) d. Borna Coric (CRO) 46 64 67(3) 61 61
Vasek Pospisil (CAN) d. [30] Fabio Fognini (ITA) 63 64 16 63
James Ward (GBR) d. Jiri Vesely (CZE) 62 76(4) 36 63
Pablo Andujar (ESP) d. Lukas Rosol (CZE) 64 16 46 76(4) 64
Sam Groth (AUS) d. James Duckworth (AUS) 75 64 76(6)

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Former Champions Federer, Murray, Nadal and Kvitova Post First Round Victories at Wimbledon

(June 30, 2015) Former Wimbledon champions Petra Kvitova Roger Federer, Rafael Nadal and Andy Murray all won their opening matches at Wimbledon on Tuesday in straight sets.

Defending Ladies’ champion Kvitova by tradition had the honor of playing the first match on Centre Court on the second day. She totally dominated Kiki Bertens of the Netherlands 6-1, 6-0 in a mere 35 minutes, losing only one point on her serve.

“I have to say sorry to them,” she said about the fans and the quick match. Unfortunately maybe for people was a little bit quicker.  My parents came.  The first 35 minutes, I have to say sorry to them.

“I think they are happy anyway.”

“I’m glad how I played today.  I don’t think I need any more, like, practice today.  I have a practice tomorrow.  I think it’s just fine.  To relax again after the sickness I had, it’s still in a good way.”

 

Seven-time Wimbledon champion Federer, making his 63 straight major, also made quick work over Damir Dzumhur of Bosnia 6-1, 6-3, 6-3. The Swiss needed only 68 minutes.

“I was happy I played aggressive,” he said. “I must say I’m very happy, always, to win like that.”

“Somehow the streak is still alive and I’m also very proud of the fact that I never retired from a match once it started,” he said. “Those two stats I care about and hope I can keep them up for the remainder of my career.”

 

Two-time champion and 10th seed Nadal moved past Thomaz Bellucci 6-4, 6-2, 6-4.

“Here the feeling in Wimbledon is so special, and playing on grass, too,” Nadal said. “So always is very emotional when you hit some good shots in this beautiful club.”

“I think I played okay; played well, played solid,” said Nadal. “I am a little bit more confident now than I was few months ago. [It’s] just day by day for me. Obviously victories help.”

2013 Wimbledon winner Andy Murray defeated Mikhail Kukushkin 6-4, 7-6(3), 6-4

“I didn’t necessarily feel nervy,” said Murray about the match. “I lost my serve a bit in the end of that second set. There was a period where I missed like 10 or 12 first serves in a row and let him back into it there. Then he played some really good stuff at times and was going for his shots. I found it difficult to play aggressive tennis out there.”

Other men’s winners on the day were No. 13 Jo-Wilfried Tsonga, No. 20 Roberto Bautista Agut, No. 22 Viktor Troicki, No. 23 Ivo Karlovic, No. 25 Andreas Seppi and No. 30 Fabio Fognini.

Wimbledon – Gentlemen’s Singles Results for June 30, 2015

[2] Roger Federer (SUI) d. Damir Dzumhur (BIH) 61 63 63
[3] Andy Murray (GBR) d. Mikhail Kukushkin (KAZ) 64 76(3) 64
[6] Tomas Berdych (CZE) d. Jeremy Chardy (FRA) 62 67(8) 76(3) 76(5)
[10] Rafael Nadal (ESP) d. Thomaz Bellucci (BRA) 64 62 64
[12] Gilles Simon (FRA) d. Nicolas Almagro (ESP) 64 64 75
[13] Jo-Wilfried Tsonga (FRA) d. Gilles Muller (LUX) 76(8) 67(3) 64 36 62
[15] Feliciano Lopez (ESP) d. Steve Darcis (BEL) 62 76(4) 64
[18] Gael Monfils (FRA) d. Pablo Carreno Busta (ESP) 64 64 75
[20] Roberto Bautista Agut (ESP) d. Ruben Bemelmans (BEL) 61 63 76(6)
[22] Viktor Troicki (SRB) d. Aleksandr Nedovyesov (KAZ) 61 64 36 63
[23] Ivo Karlovic (CRO) d. Elias Ymer (SWE) 67(2) 62 64 76(2)
[25] Andreas Seppi (ITA) d. Brydan Klein (GBR) 63 62 62
Pablo Andujar (ESP) d. [29] Guillermo Garcia-Lopez (ESP) 36 64 36 75 64
[30] Fabio Fognini (ITA) d. Tim Smyczek (USA) 64 63 62
Sam Groth (AUS) d. [31] Jack Sock (USA) 63 36 63 63
Alexandr Dolgopolov (UKR) d. Kyle Edmund (GBR) 76(4) 61 62
Albert Ramos-Vinolas (ESP) d. Denis Istomin (UZB) 62 62 32 Ret.
Lukas Rosol (CZE) d. Ernests Gulbis (LAT) 76(2) 63 76(4)
Robin Haase (NED) d. Alejandro Falla (COL) 62 36 64 62
Aljaz Bedene (SLO) d. Radek Stepanek (CZE) 75 16 46 63 64
Dustin Brown (GER) d. Yen-Hsun Lu (TPE) 36 63 75 64
Adrian Mannarino (FRA) d. Michael Berrer (GER) 67(4) 60 64 61
Borna Coric (CRO) d. Sergiy Stakhovsky (UKR) 46 76(5) 62 16 97
James Duckworth (AUS) d. Malek Jaziri (TUN) 76(2) 62 36 36 75
Nicolas Mahut (FRA) d. Filip Krajinovic (SRB) 76(4) 64 36 75
Jiri Vesely (CZE) d. Paolo Lorenzi (ITA) 76(7) 76(6) 64
Benoit Paire (FRA) d. Mikhail Youzhny (RUS) 64 64 63
Vasek Pospisil (CAN) d. Vincent Millot (FRA) 76(2) 36 67(4) 76(4) 63
Nikoloz Basilashvili (GEO) d. Facundo Bagnis (ARG) 64 76(3) 62
James Ward (GBR) d. Luca Vanni (ITA) 67(4) 62 64 63
Sam Querrey (USA) d. Igor Sijsling (NED) 75 63 64

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Notable Quotables from Pre-Wimbledon Weekend with Djokovic, Serena Williams, Federer, Sharapova, Nadal and Others

228 Djokovic being interviewed-001

(June 28, 2015) Saturday and Sunday some of Wimbledon’s top seeds held court with the media, here is a look at some of the notable quotables:

Defending Wimbledon champion Novak Djokovic on recovering from losing a mentally tough French Open final:

“Yes, it was. Not just Roland Garros, but all the five months of the year have been really intense for me.  I played a big amount of matches.  Before Roland Garros, I’ve lost only two.  I had one of the best season starts in my career.  Of course, Roland Garros finals wasn’t easy.

 

“All in all, it was another great tournament.  But I needed some time to just mentally recover, rest ‑ more than physical rest, I needed that emotional, mental rest to recharge my batteries and get myself in a proper state of mind so I can start all over again.”

 

 

“I mean, right after I lost the match, of course, there was this sense of disappointment. There is no doubt about it.  I felt that for, you know, some days after it.

 

“Because I have a family, I have different things in life, different interest, I’ve managed to move on because of the experience that I talked about previously of learning how to handle these particular situations and circumstances. I managed to get the necessary reset in my mind.”

 

 

Djokovic says that coaching from the player’s box is fairly common:

“We can’t pretend like that’s not happening in tennis.  Of course, there’s situations when it happens, and not just with the top players, with everybody.  This is a very competitive sport.  You’re alone on the court.  Of course, there’s certain rules.

 

“But also there are times when, you know, the team of the player communicates with the player when he gets to go and take the towel in the corner, which is closer to the box, or, you know, different ways.

 

“I think it’s all fine as long as it’s not regular.  I think it just depends.  Also that’s up to the chair umpire or supervisor to decide if somebody’s breaking the rules or not.  I think as long as it’s something that you can tolerate, let’s say, within the ways of communication, I think it’s fine.”

 

He was also asked about his communication with his coach Boris Becker. Earlier in the day Becker was on radio saying that he has ways of telling Djokovic whether what he is doing is good or bad.

 

“I don’t think that we’re cheating.  I don’t think that’s how you can call it.  I mean, there are special ways of, I would say, communication.  As he mentioned, the way you look at each other, the way you feel your box, and box feels what you’re going through on the court. I think that’s something that just gives you that reassurance, gives you that confidence.

 

“It’s not necessary that, you know, he tells me where to serve or to which side of the opponent’s court I have to play, because that doesn’t happen.  But it’s more of a, you know, encouragement, and more of a support and reassurance, as I said, that’s basically present in those moments.”

 

In what seemed to be the most awkward questions of the weekend, defending champion Petra Kvitova was asked about wearing white on court while menstruating.

 

Q. Heather Watson was applauded earlier this year for breaking taboo and talking about what was phrased as girly things.  How much do you think that affects other females’ players game?

 

PETRA KVITOVA:  To be honest, I think it’s quite tough.  Of course, I have these experiences from before.  It’s never really easy to deal with one more tough thing.  I think always the beginning of this kind of period, it’s tough.  I think that for normal woman, they know about.  If we have to play the match or training or something, it’s difficult.

 

It’s one more extra thing for us.

Q. Does having to wear white as well…

PETRA KVITOVA:  No, I think it’s fine.

 

 

Roger Federer on Serena Williams’ playing at such a high level:

 

“I’m not surprised.  I just think she’s a great talent.  She’s worked also very hard.  I think to be mentally ready for the challenge when she wants to be up for it, I think that’s what’s so admirable about her.

 

“Also Venus, I must say.  We don’t talk about Venus that often because Serena has been so dominant.  Actually that they’re both still playing is more of a surprise to me.

 

“But that they are playing, it doesn’t surprise me they’re actually playing well.  It goes hand‑in‑hand.

 

“I wouldn’t imagine them still playing and playing poorly.  Let’s put it that way.  They’re too good for that.”

 

Serena Williams was asked about coming into Wimbledon holding the first two majors, make her preparation different or make her feel any different.

“Personally, uhm, it doesn’t make it feel any different, which I think is a good thing ’cause I don’t feel any pressure to win all four.  I’ve been saying that, but I really don’t feel that pressure.  Maybe if I would happen to win here, then maybe I might start feeling it after that.

“Ultimately, I’m taking it one day at a time and I’m not thinking that far.”

 

Serena is very motivated this year:

“I think the fact that I lost so early the past couple years definitely makes me motivated.  But I think that also gives me a little less pressure because I haven’t done well here in the past two years.  It makes me feel like, Okay, I’ll be fine.  I have nothing to lose here.  I don’t have many points to defend here.  So it’s just like trying to have fun, go through it.”

 

The 20-time major champion talked about her biggest strength:

“I think for me being mentally tough is probably my biggest strength.  And my dad always said growing up, you know, Tennis is so mental, you have to have your mental, you have to be really mentally tough.  I guess I really took that to heart.

“I think also being the youngest of five really made me have to scrap and be tougher.  I think all those things kind of played into action.

“Yeah, I think that’s probably one of the biggest things in tennis.  It’s great to have a big serve, too.  But I think ultimately sometimes when you’re down and out, you could be the best player in the world, you still get down, but you have to be able to come back.”

 

She actually hates playing on grass:

“You know, oddly enough, it never has been my favorite surface, but I’ve always done really well here.  I think my game is really suited for the grass.

“You know, yeah, it’s never been someplace like, I love playing on the grass, which is just really weird.  But, again, my game works for it, so…”

 

 

Maria Sharapova on Serena:

“She’s certainly the player to beat.  With all the confidence in the world having won the last three majors, not just the two in this year.  I think those results speak for herself, and she’s certainly the one to beat.”

 

 

Andy Murray was asked about the “feminine influence” on his life – marriage and hiring Amelie Mauresmo.

 

“I mean, I’ve said as well, it’s not so much marriage.  Me and Kim have been together like 10 years now, so…

 

“You know, she’s always been a huge support to me, especially when I’ve gone through, you know, tough, tough times as well.  She’s always been there for me.

 

“Obviously, yeah, I mean, Amélie, really the last sort of 12 months that I’ve been with her, I feel like I’ve come through some difficult moments.  I feel last year, there was ‑ not me, myself ‑ I know there were a lot of people doubting me.  I feel like she stuck with me during that period.

 

“I had an extremely tough loss at the end of last year.  She was one of the people that really, yeah, stuck by me and supported me.

 

“I’m glad that I’ve been able to kind of repay her faith in me with some good tennis this year.

 

“Obviously she’s a very different character to some of the coaches that I’ve had in the past.  I’ve really enjoyed working with her.”

 

Rafael Nadal on the current problems of the Spanish Tennis Federation.

“The situation have been very unusual, let’s say, not nice for a country that has big tradition in this sport, for a country that the last, let’s say, 15, 20 years, we have been the first country in this sport around the world.  So is not nice to watch the situation that we are having today.  But things are like this.

“The thing that we have to do is to stop these crazy things that are happening.  You know, it’s not good to see bad news on our sport in the media every day.  It’s not good for our sport.  It’s not good to catch sponsors.  It’s not good to make the people involved on our sport.

“So all these kind of things are bad for everybody.  At the end of the day, you know, we are here today.  We will live tomorrow.  Players, presidents, everybody who is making this show last couple of months, what really suffers on all of this is tennis, tennis in our country.

“All the things that goes against tennis in our country is a bad news.”

Stan Wawrinka the fashion icon:

Are you surprised by how much of a fashion icon you became after the French Open?

STAN WAWRINKA:  It’s not me, my shorts (laughter).

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2015 Wimbledon Gentlemen’s Contender Profiles – Fast Facts with Jack Cunniff

Novak Djokovic

Novak Djokovic

(June 28, 2015) Profiles of the top Men’s Singles contenders for 2015 Wimbledon. Note: Grand Slam records for main draw matches only.  – by Jack Cunniff     http://twitter.com/jrcunniff

 

Novak Djokovic

2015 Record: 41-3

Grand Slam Record: 193-34

Wimbledon Record: 45-8

Wimbledon Best Result: Won (2011, ‘14)

Fast Fact: Djokovic is currently 11th in Open Era Wimbledon match wins with 45, but could pass Agassi (46), Lendl (48), Ivanisevic (49), Edberg (49), and Borg (51) with a title defense.

 

Roger Federer

2015 Record: 34-6

Grand Slam Record: 285-47

Wimbledon Record: 73-9

Wimbledon Best Result: Won (2003, ’04, ’05, ’06, ’07, ’09, ‘12)

Fast Fact: Federer is trying to reach his 10th Wimbledon final, the most for a player at a single major in the Open Era; he’s currently tied for first (9 Wimbledon finals) with Nadal (9 French Open finals).

 

Andy Murray

2015 Record: 41-6

Grand Slam Record: 145-35

Wimbledon Record: 41-8

Wimbledon Best Result: Won (2013)

Fast Fact: In 2015, Murray has a 41-2 record (95.3%) against players other than Novak Djokovic, but an 0-4 record vs. Djokovic.

 

Stan Wawrinka

2015 Record: 30-9

Grand Slam Record: 94-39

Wimbledon Record: 13-10

Wimbledon Best Result: QF (2014)

Fast Fact: Wawrinka has won 20 matches in Grand Slam events over the last year, more than any man except Djokovic.

 

Kei Nishikori

2015 Record: 37-9

Grand Slam Record: 44-23

Wimbledon Record: 7-6

Wimbledon Best Result: 4R (2014)

Fast Fact: Nishikori’s career record vs. Top Ten players is 23-35, but over the past year he has a winning record vs. the Top Ten (10-8).

 

Tomas Berdych

2015 Record: 37-11

Grand Slam Record: 111-47

Wimbledon Record: 29-11

Wimbledon Best Result: RU (2010)

Fast Fact: Berdych’s career record vs. Top 50 opponents on grass is 17-17 (50%).

 

Milos Raonic

2015 Record: 23-10

Grand Slam Record: 39-17

Wimbledon Record: 8-4

Wimbledon Best Result: SF (2014)

Fast Fact: In his last 10 appearances in Grand Slam events, Raonic has compiled a 27-1 record vs. players ranked outside of the Top 25 (lost to Sijsling, 2R 2013 Wimbledon).

 

Marin Cilic

2015 Record: 10-9

Grand Slam Record: 66-28

Wimbledon Record: 13-7

Wimbledon Best Result: QF (2014)

Fast Fact: Cilic has won a professional title every year for the last 7 years (since 2008), but has yet to reach a final in 2015.

 

Rafael Nadal

2015 Record: 33-11

Grand Slam Record: 195-27

Wimbledon Record: 39-8

Wimbledon Best Result: Won (2008, ‘10)

Fast Fact: Until winning in Stuttgart two weeks ago, Nadal hadn’t defeated a Top 50 opponent on grass since the 2011 Wimbledon semifinals.

 

Grigor Dimitrov

2015 Record: 19-12

Grand Slam Record: 23-19

Wimbledon Record: 8-5

Wimbledon Best Result: SF (2014)

Fast Fact: Excluding Dimitrov’s run to the 2014 Wimbledon semifinals, his record in Grand Slam events would be .500 (18-18).

 

Gilles Simon

2015 Record: 28-13

Grand Slam Record: 61-36

Wimbledon Record: 12-9

Wimbledon Best Result: 4R (2009)

Fast Fact: In his 36 Grand Slam events, Simon has earned a Top 20 seed in half of his appearances, but has managed to reach the quarterfinals only once (2009 Australian Open).

 

Jo-Wilfried Tsonga

2015 Record: 11-6

Grand Slam Record: 89-29

Wimbledon Record: 22-7

Wimbledon Best Result: SF (2011, ‘12)

Fast Fact: All 18 players to have defeated Tsonga in Grand Slam events have career high rankings in the Top 25; only three of those players have never reached the Top Ten. (Klizan – 24, Karlovic – 14, Dolgopolov – 13).

 

Kevin Anderson

2015 Record: 25-14

Grand Slam Record: 35-25

Wimbledon Record: 6-6

Wimbledon Best Result: 4R (2014)

Fast Fact: Anderson is attempting to win his 200th career ATP match in the opening round of Wimbledon (199-149).

 

Feliciano Lopez

2015 Record: 16-15

Grand Slam Record: 76-54

Wimbledon Record: 29-13

Wimbledon Best Result: QF (2005, ’08, ‘11)

Fast Fact: Lopez enters Wimbledon with a losing record on grass for the year (2-3, 40%) the first time that’s happened since 2008.

 

John Isner

2015 Record: 21-14

Grand Slam Record: 40-28

Wimbledon Record: 5-6

Wimbledon Best Result: 3R (2014)

Fast Fact: In his past 2 Wimbledon appearances, Isner has a 3-2 record, and has played 155 total games in under 9 hours, less than his historic 2010 match vs. Mahut (183 total games, over 11 hours).

 

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2015 Wimbledon Ladies’ Contender Profiles – Fast Facts with Jack Cunniff

Serena Williams

Serena Williams

(June 28, 2015) Profiles of the top Women’s Singles contenders for 2015 Wimbledon. Note: Grand Slam records for main draw matches only.  – by Jack Cunniff     http://twitter.com/jrcunniff

 

Serena Williams

2015 Record: 32-1

Grand Slam Record: 273-39

Wimbledon Record: 72-10

Wimbledon Best Result: Won (2002, ’03, ’09, ’10, ‘12)

Fast Fact: This is the best year-to-date record entering Wimbledon (32-1, 97%) of Serena’s career.

 

Petra Kvitova

2015 Record: 24-7

Grand Slam Record: 70-26

Wimbledon Record: 27-5

Wimbledon Best Result: Won (2011, ‘14)

Fast Fact: In the last five years, Kvitova has won 26 of her 29 matches at Wimbledon, with her loses coming to Serena Williams (2010, ‘12) and Flipkens (2013).

 

Simona Halep

2015 Record: 32-8

Grand Slam Record: 32-20

Wimbledon Record: 7-4

Wimbledon Best Result: SF (2014)

Fast Fact: Halep has recorded only two wins vs. Top Ten players in 2015, both coming in three set matches in Dubai (def. Makarova, Wozniacki).

 

Maria Sharapova

2015 Record: 29-6

Grand Slam Record: 174-42

Wimbledon Record: 41-11

Wimbledon Best Result: Won (2004)

Fast Fact: Sharapova’s Grand Slam match winning percentage (80.6%) is second best among active players, trailing Serena Williams (87.5%).

 

Caroline Wozniacki

2015 Record: 27-12

Grand Slam Record: 81-33

Wimbledon Record: 16-8

Wimbledon Best Result: 4R (2009, ’10, ’11, ‘14)

Fast Fact: Wozniacki has reached the quarterfinals only once in her last 13 appearances in Grand Slam events (RU, 2014 US Open).

 

Lucie Safarova

2015 Record: 22-12

Grand Slam Record: 48-40

Wimbledon Record: 9-9

Wimbledon Best Result: SF (2014)

Fast Fact: Since 2014, Safarova has a record of 19-6 (76%) in Grand Slam events; prior to 2014, her Grand Slam record was 29-34 (46%).

 

Ana Ivanovic

2015 Record: 16-11

Grand Slam Record: 103-41

Wimbledon Record: 23-10

Wimbledon Best Result: SF (2007)

Fast Fact: In 2014, Ivanovic had a 37-9 record entering Wimbledon, winning more than twice as many matches as she has in 2015.

 

Ekaterina Makarova

2015 Record: 18-11

Grand Slam Record: 56-31

Wimbledon Record: 9-7

Wimbledon Best Result: QF (2014)

Fast Fact: Since 2013, Makarova is 24-2 in Grand Slam events when playing a lower ranked opponent, with her losses coming against Kuznetsova and Safarova.

 

Carla Suarez Navarro

2015 Record: 35-13

Grand Slam Record: 47-26

Wimbledon Record: 7-5

Wimbledon Best Result: 4R (2013)

Fast Fact: Suarez Navarro has a losing record vs. Top 50 players in Grand Slam events (13-20), including a 2-4 record since 2014.

 

Angelique Kerber

2015 Record: 30-12

Grand Slam Record: 50-30

Wimbledon Record: 12-7

Wimbledon Best Result: SF (2012)

Fast Fact: After compiling an 8-9 record in the first three months of 2015, Kerber has since gone 22-3 and won three titles (Charleston, Stuttgart, Birmingham).

 

Karolina Pliskova

2015 Record: 35-13

Grand Slam Record: 9-12

Wimbledon Record: 2-3

Wimbledon Best Result: 2R (2013, ‘14)

Fast Fact: Following the 2014 U.S. Open, Pliskova has more than doubled her WTA main draw match wins: 42 wins between April 2008 – August 2014, 49 wins between September 2014 – June 2015.

 

Eugenie Bouchard

2015 Record: 8-13

Grand Slam Record: 27-9

Wimbledon Record: 8-2

Wimbledon Best Result: RU (2014)

Fast Fact: Having lost her last six three-set matches, Bouchard now has a losing WTA record in three setters (20-25).

 

Agnieszka Radwanska

2015 Record: 22-15

Grand Slam Record: 93-36

Wimbledon Record: 31-9

Wimbledon Best Result: RU (2012)

Fast Fact: Radwanska’s grass court record in the last year is 10-3 (77%), compared to a record of 27-22 (55%) off of grass.

 

Andrea Petkovic

2015 Record: 20-12

Grand Slam Record: 34-22

Wimbledon Record: 5-4

Wimbledon Best Result: 3R (2011, ‘14)

Fast Fact: The highest ranked player Petkovic has defeated on grass is Garcia (No. 33) who she defeated in 2015 Eastbourne.

 

Venus Williams

2015 Record: 20-7

Grand Slam Record: 225-59

Wimbledon Record: 73-12

Wimbledon Best Result: Won (2000, ’01, ’05, ’07, ‘08)

Fast Fact: 2015 Wimbledon marks Venus’ 67th appearance in a Grand Slam event, tying her with Navratilova for second place in the Open Era (Frazier, 71).

 

Sabine Lisicki

2015 Record: 15-15

Grand Slam Record: 48-27

Wimbledon Record: 23-6

Wimbledon Best Result: RU (2013)

Fast Fact: Lisicki has appeared in 27 Grand Slam events, but nearly half of her match wins (23 of 48) are from her last 5 Wimbledon appearances.

 

 

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