July 26, 2016

US Open Wild Card Challenge Standings

US Open Wild Card Challenge Standings

(as of July 25)

 

 

From the USTA: (July 25, 2016) With one week left in the USTA Pro Circuit’s women’s US Open Wild Card Challenge, a berth in the 2016 US Open main draw will be decided this week at the Kentucky Bank Tennis Championships, a $50,000 event in Lexington, Ky.

 

The race for the women’s wild card is close, with many players still in contention and 80 points up for grabs in Lexington. 17-year-old Sofia Kenin is currently in first place after winning the $50,000 FSP Gold River Women’s Challenger in Sacramento, Calif., this weekend for her second career USTA Pro Circuit singles title and first $50,000 title. Grace Min, who advanced to the final in Sacramento, is in second place with 49 points, while young American CiCi Bellis is in third place.

 

The men’s wild card challenge kicked off last week with the Levene Gouldin & Thompson Tennis Challenger, a $50,000 Challenger in Binghamton, N.Y. Mitchell Krueger advanced to the final in Binghamton to take the early lead in the men’s race with 48 points. The men’s wild card challenge continues into its second week, also in Lexington.

 

All matches will be streamed live on www.procircuit.usta.com. 

  

The standings, as of July 25, are as follows:

 

USTA Player Development will award a US Open main draw wild card to one American man and one American woman who earn the most ATP World Tour and WTA ranking points in a series of USTA Pro Circuit hard-court events this summer. Men’s events include $50,000 Challengers in Binghamton and Lexington, Ky., as well as a $100,000 Challenger in Aptos, Calif. Women’s tournaments include $50,000 events in Stockton, Sacramento, and Lexington.

 

Ranking points from two out of the three men’s and women’s events will be used and combined to calculate the point total and determine the US Open wild card recipient. If a player competes in more than two events, only his or her two best tournaments will be counted in calculating the point total. In the event of a tie, the player with the best ATP or WTA singles ranking will be awarded the wild card. Only players who have not earned direct acceptance into the US Open are eligible for the wild card.

 

The USTA first used this US Open wild card format for its 2012 wild cards, won by Steve Johnson and Mallory Burdette, both of whom reached the third round of the US Open. In 2013, Bradley Klahn and Shelby Rogers earned the wild cards, with Klahn winning his first-round match, and in 2014, Nicole Gibbs reached the third round of the US Open (her career-best Grand Slam result), while Wayne Odesnik earned the men’s wild card. Last year, Bjorn Fratangelo made his Grand Slam main draw debut by earning the men’s wild card, while Samantha Crawford competed in the US Open as the women’s wild card. The USTA also utilizes this wild card challenge format for the French Open and Australian Open.

 

The 2016 US Open main draw will be held Monday, Aug. 29, to Sunday, Sept. 11.

 

Information on the US Open Wild Card Challenge will be available at www.procircuit.usta.com and on Twitter through @USTAProCircuit.

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Djokovic, Murray, Federer and Nadal Headline US Open Men’s Field

Novak Djokovic

NOVAK DJOKOVIC, ANDY MURRAY, ROGER FEDERER, RAFAEL NADAL

HEADLINE 2016 US OPEN MEN’S SINGLES FIELD

Field Features Five Former US Open Champions

and Includes the World’s Top 98 Men

From the USTA: White Plains, N.Y., July 20, 2016 – The USTA today announced that defending US Open champion and world No. 1 Novak Djokovic, world No. 2 and reigning Wimbledon champion Andy Murray, five-time US Open champion and world No. 3 Roger Federer, and two-time US Open champion and world No. 4 Rafael Nadal headline the men’s singles field for the 2016 US Open Tennis Championships. The field includes five former US Open singles champions, including Djokovic (2011, 2015), Murray (2012), Federer (2004-2008), Nadal (2010, 2013) and Marin Cilic (2014).

Each of the world’s top 98 men received direct entry into the US Open, representing 38 countries.

The 2016 US Open will be played Monday, August 29, through Sunday, September 11, at the USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center in Flushing, N.Y. The US Open Men’s Singles Championship is presented by Mercedes-Benz.

Djokovic,who has reached the singles final in Flushing five out of the last six years, leads the men’s field as the world No. 1 and defending US Open champion. The Serbian won his 12th major championship at the French Open in June to complete the “Career Grand Slam,” and held all four major titles until Sam Querrey ended his 30-match win streak at Grand Slams in the third round at Wimbledon.

Murray, of Great Britain, won his third major and second Wimbledon title this month after finishing runner-up to Djokovic in this year’s Australian and French Open finals. Murray, the reigning Olympic Gold Medalist, defeated Djokovic in the 2012 US Open final to win his first Grand Slam championship.

Federer, of Switzerland, is the all-time leader with 17 major singles titles, and was bidding for his eighth Wimbledon title this summer before falling to Milos Raonic in the semifinals. Federer is competing for his sixth US Open title, which would surpass Pete Sampras and Jimmy Connors for the most US Open men’s singles titles in the Open Era.

Nadal, of Spain, is a 14-time Grand Slam champion who won his 69th career ATP World Tour title in Barcelona this April. He has not played competitively since withdrawing from the French Open in June with a wrist injury.

Also included in the men’s singles field are: No. 5 Stan Wawrinka, of Switzerland, the 2014 Australian Open and 2015 French Open champion; No. 6 Kei Nishikori, of Japan, a 2014 US Open finalist; No. 7 Milos Raonic, of Canada, who reached his first Grand Slam singles final at Wimbledon this month; No. 8 Tomas Berdych, of the Czech Republic, a former world No. 4 and 2016 Wimbledon semifinalist; No. 9 Dominic Thiem, the 22-year old Austrian talent; No. 10 Jo-Wilfried Tsonga, of France; No. 11 David Goffin, of Belgium; and No. 12 Marin Cilic, the 2014 US Open champion.

Canadian Vasek Pospisil, ranked No. 98, is the last man to receive direct entry into the field of 128. Six players used a protected ranking to gain entry, including Nos. 39 Julien Benneteau, of France, and Janko Tipsarevic, of Serbia, No. 56 Brian Baker, of the United States, No. 81 Thanasi Kokkinakis, of Australia, No. 89 Dmitry Tursunov, of Russia, and No. 94 Jerzy Janowicz, of Poland. Sixteen more players will gain entry through the US Open Qualifying Tournament, held August 23-26, while the eight remaining spots are wild cards awarded by the USTA.

American men who received direct entry are No. 16 John Isner, of Greensboro, N.C., No. 25 Steve Johnson, of Orange, Calif., No. 26 Jack Sock, of Lincoln, Neb., No. 29 Sam Querrey, of Las Vegas, No. 56 Brian Baker, of Nashville, Tenn., No. 57 Donald Young, of Atlanta, and No. 67 Taylor Fritz, of Rancho Santa Fe, Calif.

Argentina’s Juan Martin del Potro, the 2009 US Open champion, is entered as an alternate and would be making his first appearance at the US Open since 2013.

Among the players competing in the US Open Qualifying Tournament will be the winner of the seventh annual US Open National Playoffs – Men’s Championship, held during the Emirates Airline US Open Series’ Connecticut Open in New Haven, Conn., prior to the US Open Qualifying Tournament. The USTA created the US Open National Playoffs in 2010 to allow players 14 and older, regardless of playing ability or nationality, to vie for a spot in the US Open Qualifying Tournament via one of 15 sectional qualifying tournaments.

The July 18 edition of the Emirates ATP Rankings was used to determine the US Open main draw entry list. Seeds will be determined and announced closer to the start of the event.

The 2016 US Open will mark the culmination of the Emirates Airline US Open Series, the North American summer season of seven ATP World Tour and WTA events that began this week in Stanford, Calif.

The US Open is the highest-attended annual sporting event in the world. 2016 marks the second year of an 11-year partnership between the USTA and ESPN, which will see the US Open carried on the ESPN family of networks through 2025. During this year’s US Open, ESPN and ESPN2 will combine to air nearly 130 hours of live match play with more than 1,200 hours of first-to-last ball coverage to be seen on ESPN3 on WatchESPN, which will also be available via the US Open website – USOpen.org.  In the continued expansion of its US Open coverage, ESPN will feature play from up to 12 courts.

US Open tickets can be purchased: at USOpen.org; by calling Ticketmaster at 1-866-OPEN-TIX; and at all Ticketmaster outlets.

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Six-Time Champion Serena Williams Leads 2016 US Open’s Women’s Field

WORLD NO. 1 AND SIX-TIME CHAMPION SERENA WILLIAMS LEADS 2016 US OPEN WOMEN’S SINGLES FIELD AND VIES TO WIN RECORD 23RD GRAND SLAM

Fourteen U.S. Women Receive Direct Entry into the Main Draw –

the Most of Any Country and the Most Since 2004

Field Includes Four Former US Open Singles Champions – Serena Williams,

Venus Williams, Samantha Stosur and Svetlana Kuznetsova

From the USTA: White Plains, N.Y., July 20, 2016 – The USTA today announced that world No. 1 and six-time US Open champion Serena Williams leads the women’s singles field for the 2016 US Open Tennis Championships. Williams is joined by 101 of the world’s top 103 women, including 2016 Australian Open champion and world No. 2 Angelique Kerber, 2016 French Open champion and world No. 3 Garbiñe Muguruza, two-time US Open champion and world No. 7 Venus Williams, 2015 US Open finalist Roberta Vinci, 2014 US Open finalist Caroline Wozniacki, and former US Open champions Samantha Stosur and Svetlana Kuznetsova.

In total, 37 different countries are represented in the women’s field. Fourteen U.S. women received direct entry into the main draw – the most of any country and the most direct entries for American women since 2004 when there were 15 entries.

The 2016 US Open will be played Monday, August 29, through Sunday, September 11, at the USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center in Flushing, N.Y. The US Open Women’s Singles Championship is presented by J.P. Morgan.

Leading the entry list is world No. 1 Serena Williams, who won her sixth US Open crown in 2014, tying her with Chris Evert for the most US Open women’s singles titles in the Open Era. At this year’s US Open, Williams is looking to break the record for the most Grand Slam singles titles in the Open Era. At Wimbledon, Williams tied Steffi Graf for the most major titles when Williams won her 22nd Grand Slam singles title.  

Joining Williams in the field’s top four are world No. 2 Kerber, of Germany, who defeated Serena Williams in the Australian Open final this year and also reached the 2016 Wimbledon final; No. 3 Muguruza, of Spain, the 2016 French Open champion and 2015 Wimbledon finalist; and No. 4 Agnieszka Radwanska, of Poland, the first Polish player to reach a Grand Slam singles final (2012 Wimbledon) and a 2016 Australian Open semifinalist.

Rounding out the top 10 entries are: No. 5 Simona Halep, of Romania, the 2014 French Open finalist and 2015 US Open semifinalist; No. 7 Venus Williams, of the United States, who won the US Open in 2000 and 2001 and is a seven-time Grand Slam singles champion; No. 8 Roberta Vinci, of Italy, who reached her first Grand Slam final at the US Open last year at age 32; No. 9 Carla Suárez Navarro, of Spain, a five-time Grand Slam quarterfinalist, who reached the US Open quarterfinals in 2013; No. 10 Svetlana Kuznetsova, of Russia, the 2004 US Open champion and 2009 French Open champion; and world No. 11 Madison Keys, of the United States, a 2015 Australian Open semifinalist, who debuted in the Top 10 last month after winning her second career WTA title.

World No. 6 and two-time US Open singles finalist Victoria Azarenka will not be competing in this year’s US Open after announcing her pregnancy last week. 2006 US Open champion Maria Sharapova, ranked No. 97 this week, will also not compete due to an ITF anti-doping provisional suspension, which is currently under appeal.

Nine players who have won Grand Slam singles titles in their careers are competing in the US Open this year, including two-time Wimbledon champion Petra Kvitova (2011, 2014), former world No. 1 and 2008 French Open champion Ana Ivanovic, of Serbia, and 2010 French Open champion Francesca Schiavone, of Italy.

Belarus’ Aliaksandra Sasnovich, ranked No. 103, is the last player accepted directly into the women’s field of 128. Azarenka and Sharapova are the only withdrawals. Three players are using a special ranking to gain entry into the main draw – No. 27 Peng Shuai, of China, No. 64 Galina Voskoboeva, of Kazakhstan, and No. 91 Vitalia Diatchenko, of Russia. Sixteen more players will gain entry through the US Open Qualifying Tournament, August 23-26, while the remaining eight spots are wild cards awarded by the USTA.

In addition to Serena Williams, Venus Williams, and Keys, the other American women who received direct entry into this year’s tournament include: No. 23 Sloane Stephens, of Coral Springs, Fla., No. 35 Coco Vandeweghe, of Rancho Santa Fe, Calif., No. 52 Varvara Lepchenko, of Allentown, Pa., No. 55 Madison Brengle, of Dover, Del., No. 57 Shelby Rogers, of Charleston, S.C., No. 63 Christina McHale, of Englewood Cliffs, N.J., No. 69 Louisa Chirico, of Harrison, N.Y., No.  70 Irina Falconi, of West Palm Beach, Fla., No. 71 Nicole Gibbs, of Santa Monica, Calif., No. 78 Alison Riske, of Pittsburgh, and No. 101 Samantha Crawford, of Tamarac, Fla.

Several of the young Americans listed above have had breakout performances on the WTA tour this year. Stephens, 23, won three WTA titles this year (Auckland, Acapulco, and Charleston); Vandeweghe, 24, won her second career WTA singles title in ‘s-Hertogenbosch; and Rogers, 23, advanced to her first-ever Grand Slam quarterfinal at the French Open. 

Among the players competing in the US Open Qualifying Tournament will be the winner of the seventh annual US Open National Playoffs – Women’s Championship, held during the Emirates Airline US Open Series’ Connecticut Open in New Haven, Conn., prior to the US Open Qualifying Tournament. The USTA created the US Open National Playoffs in 2010 to allow players 14 and older, regardless of playing ability or nationality, to vie for a spot in the US Open Qualifying Tournament via one of 15 sectional qualifying tournaments.

The July 18 edition of the WTA rankings was used to determine the US Open main draw entry list. Seeds will be determined and announced closer to the start of the event.

The 2016 US Open will mark the culmination of the Emirates Airline US Open Series, the North American summer season of seven ATP World Tour and WTA events that began this week in Stanford, Calif.

The US Open is the highest-attended annual sporting event in the world. 2016 marks the second year of an 11-year partnership between the USTA and ESPN, which will see the US Open carried on the ESPN family of networks through 2025. During this year’s US Open, ESPN and ESPN2 will combine to air nearly 130 hours of live match play with more than 1,200 hours of first-to-last ball coverage to be seen on ESPN3 on WatchESPN, which will also be available via the US Open website – USOpen.org.  In the continued expansion of its US Open coverage, ESPN will feature play from up to 12 courts

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US Open Tickets Go On Sale To The Public on June 6, 2016

2011-US-Open-Tennis-Tournament

From the USTA: WHITE PLAINS, N.Y., June 3, 2016 – The USTA today announced that tickets to the 2016 US Open will go on sale to the general public on Monday, June 6, starting at 9:00 a.m. ET.  The 2016 US Open will be played at the USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center in Flushing, N.Y., Monday, August 29 through Sunday, September 11.

Arthur Ashe Kids’ Day presented by Hess, a full-day tennis and music festival for families and children, will kick off the US Open, taking place on Saturday, August 27.  Tickets for the 2016 US Open and the Arthur Ashe Kids’ Day presented by Hess stadium show can be purchased:

  • at USOpen.org
  • by calling Ticketmaster at 1-866-OPEN-TIX
  • at all Ticketmaster outlets

Payment can be made by credit card – American Express is the Official Card of the US Open.  For ticket plan availability, group sales, disabled seating and other US Open information, call 1-866-OPEN-TIX.

The 2016 US Open will feature day sessions beginning at 11:00 a.m. and night sessions beginning at 7:00 p.m. from Monday, August 29 through the quarterfinals on Wednesday, September 7.  The Women’s Singles Semifinals are scheduled for 7:00 p.m. on Thursday, September 8, and the Men’s Singles Semifinals for 3:00 p.m. on Friday, September 9.  The Women’s Singles Final is scheduled for 4:00 p.m. on Saturday, September 10, with the Men’s Singles Final at 4:00 p.m. on Sunday, September 11.

The 2015 US Open saw Novak Djokovic capture his second US Open men’s singles championship, defeating Roger Federer in the final,  with first-time Grand Slam and US Open women’s singles champion Flavia Pennetta defeating country-woman Roberta Vinci in an all-Italian women’s final.

For the second-straight year, the US Open will be distributed across the ESPN family of networks, on ESPN, ESPN2 and ESPN3. In addition, an hour-long Arthur Ashe Kids’ Day presented by Hess special will air at 2:00 p.m. on ABC, on Sunday, August 28.

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US Open National Playoffs Return for Seventh Year

USTA Shield Logo

From the USTA: (March 2, 2016) WHITE PLAINS, N.Y., – The USTA today announced that the US Open National Playoffs will be held for the seventh season this year, expanding the footprint of the US Open to cities nationwide by providing the opportunity for all players 14 years of age and older to earn a berth into all five draws at the US Open. Tennis players of all levels can compete in men’s singles, women’s singles, men’s doubles, women’s doubles, and mixed doubles.

 

The US Open National Playoffs men’s and women’s singles champions earn a wild card into the US Open Qualifying Tournament, held the week prior to the US Open. The US Open National Playoffs men’s, women’s, and mixed doubles champions receive a wild card into the main draw of the 2016 US Open.

 

“The US Open National Playoffs are all about giving players of all abilities the opportunity to dream big and be a part of the US Open,” said Katrina M. Adams, USTA Chairman of the Board, CEO and President. “This year, players have more ways than ever to make it to New York, with all five of the US Open’s draws in play. We look forward to another year of great tennis and watching top juniors, collegians, aspiring pros, and weekend warriors connect with the US Open and compete for the chance to play on tennis’ grandest stage.”

 

Registration for the 2016 sectional qualifying tournaments opens on Tuesday, March 15, at www.USOpen.org/NationalPlayoffs. The entry fee for each of the sectional qualifying tournaments varies, with men’s and women’s singles entries ranging from $75-$100 per player and men’s, women’s, and mixed doubles entries ranging from $45-$60 per player. All players competing must have a current USTA membership valid through Aug. 29, 2016.

 

The US Open National Playoffs begin as a series of 15 sectional qualifying tournaments held in different USTA sections across the country (see complete schedule on page 2). The 15 champions or top available finishers in each division from each sectional qualifying tournament advance to the following US Open National Playoffs Championship events that will take place in conjunction with the Connecticut Open presented by United Technologies, an Emirates Airline US Open Series event, in New Haven, Conn.:

  • Men’s and Women’s Singles Championship, Aug. 19-22
  • Men’s and Women’s Doubles Championship, Aug. 21-24
  • Mixed Doubles Championship, Aug. 24-27

Players may compete at different sectional qualifying tournaments in each division (one for men’s or women’s singles, one for mixed doubles and/or one for men’s or women’s doubles). However, a player may only compete in one sectional qualifying tournament per division during a calendar year. Participants can be of any playing level, giving everyone an opportunity to advance.

 

CLICK HERE TO VIEW THE 2016 US OPEN NATIONAL PLAYOFFS SCHEDULE

 

More than 2,000 players competed in the 2015 US Open National Playoffs—the largest number of players ever. Players ranged from experienced professionals who were once ranked in the Top 50, to junior players and current/ former college standouts, to recreational players of all playing abilities and walks of life. Participants included those competing for charity, businesspeople, musicians, lawyers, reporters, former athletes, and stay-at-home mothers.

 

Notable past participants include Olympic skier Bode Miller; musician Redfoo of the music group LMFAO, who competed in three draws in the 2015 US Open National Playoffs sectional qualifiers; ESPN’s Mike Greenberg, who teamed with six-time US Open champion Chris Evert in mixed doubles; and LuAnn De Lesseps and Jill Zarin of “The Real Housewives of New York City.”

 

The US Open Qualifying Tournament will be held Aug. 23-26, the US Open men’s and women’s doubles championships begin Aug. 30, and the US Open mixed doubles championship begins Aug. 31 at the USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center in Flushing, N.Y. The 2016 US Open is scheduled to take place from Aug. 29 to Sept. 11.

 

US Open National Playoffs information is available at www.USOpen.org/NationalPlayoffs.

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In His Own Words – Novak Djokovic After Winning the 2015 US Open

228 Djokovic split fh-001

U.S. OPEN

Monday, September 14, 2015

Novak Djokovic

Press Conference

N. DJOKOVIC/R. Federer

6-4, 5-7, 6-4, 6-4

THE MODERATOR: Questions, please.

Q. You played the all time Grand Slam champion tonight; you might be playing with the greatest generation of players ever, and you’re dominating them. How do you feel about that?
NOVAK DJOKOVIC: Well, I wouldn’t necessarily say I’m dominating, but I definitely am very proud of all of the achievements. You know, winning Grand Slam is very special for any tennis player when you are dreaming of becoming a professional tennis player. When you are kind of finding that inspiration, motivation, these are the tournaments you dream of winning.

So to actually relive these moments again after 2011 it’s quite incredible. To win against one of the biggest rivals, as you said, all-time Grand Slam champion, somebody that, you know, always keeps on fighting till the last point, keeps making you play an extra shot, yeah, all these things now are very special to me.

Obviously I owe a great gratitude to my team and for making sure I can perform as well as I did, you know, all these years. And tonight is a night that I will definitely remember for a long time.

Q. It’s been said by players and analysts that Roger is playing arguably the best tennis of his career. He played you so well tonight; pushed you back against the wall. Seems like when it was there you came up with your best tennis and your tenth Grand Slam victory. What did it mean to get through this match tonight and what does this accomplishment mean to you?
NOVAK DJOKOVIC: Well, it’s been an incredible season. I’m very fortunate to experience a great success this year.

The season is not over, but the Grand Slam is over. The biggest tournaments that I have played this year, as anybody else, and I won three out of four. It’s more than I could ask for, definitely.

Of course I do have lots of expectations and high ambitions whenever I’m approaching the Grand Slams or any other tournament, but, you know, now actually sitting down here with this trophy and reflecting on what I have achieved, it’s quite incredible.

So I’m definitely very satisfied and proud of that. As you said, you know, he played great tennis throughout the entire year. I think as the season was going by he was elevating his game. He was improving. Now he came up with a different shot, as well, the shot that nobody has ever seen.

And it’s been working well also against me in Cincinnati and also here. He’s just not going away. He’s not dropping his level too much. You know, I was saying on the court that he’s always going to be out there making you play your best if you want to win.

So that’s who Roger is. That’s why he has won so many Grand Slam titles.

And I knew that coming to the court. I knew he’s going to be aggressive. He’s going to try to disrupt my rhythm, and he’s going to put a lot of variety in his game. slice, chip and charge, come to the net, serve and volley. Which he did.

But I was ready for it. I was ready for the battle. That’s what it was. Three hours, 20 minutes. We pushed each other to the limit, as we always do.

It’s an ultimate challenge that I can have now winning against Roger back to back finals in Wimbledon and here, US Open. It’s tremendous. I’m really, really proud of it.

Q. Everybody was always talking about your magic 2011. This year you made not just the slams winning but also a final which you didn’t do in 2011. What can you say it’s more difficult now to do a repeat, I mean, to do a second time than the first one? And also, I appreciate the fact that at the end of the ceremony you didn’t say anything about the public. Because today the crowd was against you as I have never seen any — only Davis Cup maybe some matches. It was, I guess, very, very difficult. Can you say something about that?
NOVAK DJOKOVIC: Well, the first question, yes. I think it’s definitely more difficult to repeat something like that than actually doing it for the first time again. I’m a different player, a different person today than I was 2011.

As a father and a husband, you know, experiencing different variety of things in my life, it’s completely different approach to tennis today.

I feel more fulfilled. I feel more complete as a player today than I was in 2011. Physically stronger, mentally more experienced, and tougher, as well. Trying to use the experience from before into every match that I play, and especially the big ones like today.

You know, I think being in the situation before helped me to understand particular obstacles that are on the way and how I need to overcome them, which I did tonight.

And regarding the crowd, look, I mean, you know, there was a lot of support for Roger. There was some for me. I mean, for sure, I tried to focus on the ones that were supporting me.

But I can’t, you know, sit here and criticize the crowd. On the contrary, you know, I think it’s logical to expect that a great player and a champion like Roger has the majority of the support anywhere I play him. You know, I would say super majority of places around the world are going to give him that support.

Now, percentage-wise, more or less, I don’t know. I’m not there to judge who is supporting more or less. I’m there to play tennis.

I accept the fact. You know, everybody has a choice to support a player that they want to support, and he absolutely deserves to have the support he does because of all the years and success that he had and the way he carries himself on and off the court. No question about it.

Me, I’m there to earn the support, and hopefully in the future I can be in that position.

Q. Do you think your resilience again made the difference?
NOVAK DJOKOVIC: Just being mentally tough and trying to hang in there and play point by point. Obviously much easier said than done. As I was saying before, I was aware that he was going to come out with a clear game plan to pressure me and come to the net and, you know, mix up and come second serve, come to the net, as well.

Just, you know, take out time from me. Because I like to have a little bit more time. That’s my style of game. He likes one, two, three shot points. He loves to play quick.

You know, you could feel the momentum was switching from my side to his side for, I think, all the way till the end of the third. It was anybody’s game. It was really even.

When I managed to break at 4-All and managed to hold after saving couple break points in 5-4 and winning the third set, that obviously gave me a huge wind in the back, and I managed to play really well after that.

5-2 serving, I thought, Okay, now this is the time to finish it off, but it wasn’t. He showed once again why he’s competing in such a high level for so many years.

Again, he never stepped back, and he always made me play an extra shot, extra shot, kept pushing. Yeah, I was fortunate to come up with some big serves when I needed to. You know, serve was not really a strong link tonight for me, but in the important moments I got a couple of free points in the last game on serve, and that’s what matters.

Q. You made an interesting comment the other day where you said you like to be in a creative spirit all the time. It can’t be easy for anyone to be out there, 23,000 people are howling, and not so much for you. Within yourself, how do you set that creative spirit to retain your focus and block out the crowd and do whatever you have to do?
NOVAK DJOKOVIC: Well, look, I mean, if we had this conversation maybe five years ago, you know, situation would be probably different. Because as I said, I’m a more experienced player and I have been in these situations before. I have played Roger over 40 times, and a lot of times in final stages of Grand Slams.

I know how that feels, you know, regarding the crowd and support and everything. With that on my mind, I came on the court aware that this is going to be the, you know, reality. There’s not much I can do about it. You know, I just need to try to focus on what I need to do and my game plan and try to execute it in the best possible way. That’s where I keep my focus.

Obviously, you know, over the course of, you know, three hours 20 minutes match, you do have some, you know, ups and downs in concentration. You do let sometimes certain things to distract you. But it’s important to get back on the course and go back to basics and why you are there and what you need to do.

So, you know, obviously it’s…

Sorry. You like my voice? I mean, is it calming you down? Getting is you in the zen state? I’m sorry. (To the guy sleeping.) We just woke him up.

So as I was saying, yes, basically, you know, to keep your focus, whatever is happening outside of the dimensions of the court is basically not in your hands.

I mean, the crowd gets into it. You interact with players, especially here in New York. Every Grand Slam has something unique about it. New York is about night session. You know, music, entertainment, crowd interaction. It’s part of the show. It’s part of what we do, and that’s why this tournament is so special.

You come here knowing that this is going to — you know, this is what is waiting for you. And plus, if you’re playing Roger who is a crowd favorite anywhere he goes, especially here, it’s a reality you have to face.

Q. Today in this final, you visited the net; not as many as Roger, but you won 66% of those. The same percentage as Roger. How do you qualify in general terms your game, net, today and all over the tournament? Your expectations for the future on this side?
NOVAK DJOKOVIC: Well, I’m not as natural, I would say, going to the net like Roger is, but I have been working on that part of my game with Boris on board. Of course was a fantastic serve and volley, you know, net player, great volleys.

So we are trying to, you know, kind of always find room for improvement in my game, something that we can work on. Net game is definitely a part of my game which can be improved.

So, you know, I know my game is based on the baseline. I’m a baseline player. But I give myself a lot of opportunities with good shots from baseline, and I don’t come to close it out in the net. That’s what I have been trying to do.

Again, it’s not easy to come to the net many times against Roger who is standing on the line. Whether he’s offensive or defensive, he’s always more or less baseline. He picks up half volleys, plays very quick, and doesn’t give you much time.

I have been pretty pleased with the way I played on the net today. I thought it was okay.

Q. Someone asked you about the spill you took?
NOVAK DJOKOVIC: No.

Q. What happened there? Can you describe what it was? What was hurting? Obviously elbow, knee, hand.
NOVAK DJOKOVIC: Yes, it was a three-hour wait, first of all, rain delay, warming up, cooling down, eating, not eating, you know, figuring out what’s going on, will we get on the court at all tonight or not?

So finally we did, and there was still a little bit of moisture on the court I think from the rain and a bit of humidity and so forth.

That’s what happened. I think third or fourth game I slipped and hurt myself, but it was luckily nothing that was major that could, you know, be of concern for — I needed two, three games really to kind of regroup after what has happened, but it was just an impact, just the fall itself.

But, you know, the scratches I have all over the body, it’s just they are wounds basically. I didn’t twist anything. I didn’t, you know, hurt anything.

Q. New York, obviously Stefan Edberg always said this was a difficult test. He said he hated it at first and then it gave him something he didn’t know about himself. Obviously this has been a tougher one to win for you in finals, but you solved it. What’s been tough on you about New York? How have you worked your way through it to understand this tournament and unique challenge?
NOVAK DJOKOVIC: Well, as you said, you know, I have played before tonight’s final five finals. I have lost four and won one.

A couple of finals, ’12 and ’13 I thought I could have won, but again, lost to Nadal and Murray, two great players. Went down to the wire a couple of points that decided a winner.

Tonight was another match that was decided by few points. That’s what happens. You know, Grand Slam finals really are no clear favorites, especially if you’re playing against biggest rivals.

As I was answering before, I can’t really find a particular reason why I have not been so successful in the finals here as I am maybe in Melbourne, for example, or Wimbledon.

But I’m glad that this tradition of losing in finals is broke now. (Laughter.) Yeah, hopefully I can have more chances to fight for a trophy.

Q. Roger says that you’ll obviously win more Grand Slams if you remain healthy and obviously hungry. How hungry are you? And is 17, 18 anywhere in your sights?
NOVAK DJOKOVIC: Well, we got two to double digits now, and I’m so, you know, obviously flattered and honored to be a part of elite group of players, legends of our sports to manage to win this many Grand Slam trophies in their lives and careers.

So to be just mentioned alongside them is truly something special. I’m 28. I have always valued the care for my body, and, you know, my mind and had this holistic approach to life. I always thought this is utmost importance for my tennis.

I will continue on with the same kind of lifestyle, same kind of approach. I think that kind of approach brought me to where I am today. Hopefully this kind of approach will give me longevity and that I can have many more years to come, and as I said, many more opportunities to fight for these trophies.

That’s why I’m playing this sport, you know, because, first of all, I enjoy it, I love it, have passion for it, and then, you know, fight for the biggest trophies.

As long as there is this flare in me I will be coming back and bore you guys with my answers in the press conference.

Q. Can I ask a little show business question from Scotland? Was there an actor, Gerard Butler in your box tonight? How did you guys meet? What’s your relationship? You were embracing very warmly at the end.
NOVAK DJOKOVIC: Yes, well, we know each other for several years and we are good friends. So he happened to be in the city last couple of days, so I invited him to come. It’s very nice of him to be there and show me support.

Funny enough, I actually sent him a photo and a message last night. I was watching 300 movie, and so one of the things when I went to my box, when I embraced all my family and team, when I looked at him I said, This is Sparta. It felt great. That’s one of the most inspiring movies I watched.

So actually, yeah, he’s a very cool guy.

Q. We felt maybe from Scotland he would be a Murray fan.
NOVAK DJOKOVIC: He is, but I was not playing Murray. He thought it was appropriate to come to this match.

FastScripts Transcript by ASAP Sports

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In His Own Words – Roger Federer After 2015 US Open Final Loss

227 Federer in press 1-001

U.S. OPEN

Sunday, September 13, 2015

Roger Federer

Press Conference

N. DJOKOVIC/R. Federer

6-4, 5-7, 6-4, 6-4

THE MODERATOR: Questions, please.

Q. You played an outstanding match. You were playing so well. Is there consolation in that, or just disappointment that you weren’t able to maybe convert some of those break points and come away with a win?
ROGER FEDERER: Yeah, I mean, there is definitely consolation it’s been a great stretch all the way for many months now.

Also to receive the crowd support that I did receive. I don’t consider that normal. I always say. Say like it feels like you’re winning, as well, but I felt like I was sort of up in the score, they kept me going, and that’s definitely one of the reasons I still keep playing, because of these moments, goose bump moments. It’s great.

Yeah, surely I am very disappointed. Like you said, I had my chances on my racquet. I should never been down in the score the way I was. But Novak did a great job of fending them off, and, you know, all of that.

It was a tough night, but still, I don’t know, thrilling at the same time.

Q. Was the third set the key of this match? Seemed in the third you were maybe a bit better than him.
ROGER FEDERER: Yeah, third and fourth, really.

Q. He seemed to find another gear. When you had those break opportunities, it was like he just elevated. Is that sort of the key to his…
ROGER FEDERER: I didn’t feel that way, to be quite honest. I had too many break chances. Of course some of them I could have done better, should have done better, you know, all these things.

Surely he didn’t give me much, you know, and all that, that’s for sure, but still I should have done better.

Q. The rain delay and the change of start time, did that disrupt you?
ROGER FEDERER: No. I mean, that’s part of the game. That’s what we do. I felt like they communicated well enough with us what was going on.

Yeah, I mean, the good thing is when there is a rain delay at this stage of the tournament, I mean, obviously there is some pressure involved. At the same time, wherever you are it’s very quiet rather than first match of the tournament where it’s just like a thousand people everywhere where you can’t even get two square meters for yourself.

Q. The year has not ended and you have already reached the last two Grand Slam finals. So how do you match these results? Of course it’s always better to win, but how do you match these achievements compared to your expectations and targets and goals at the beginning of this year?
ROGER FEDERER: Yeah, I mean, I am playing a good year, you know. I’m playing good tennis. I am happy with where my level is at. I’m able to be, you know, consistent, very consistent.

I’m able to beat the best players regularly. Cincinnati obviously was a great feeling beating world No. 1 and world No. 2 in the same week. I don’t think I have done that before.

And then of course it’s also disappointment. Lost too many times in finals. But at the same time, I did win my tournaments, the ones I was supposed to. The one I got I was very got happy the way I was playing. Year’s not over yet. I usually do have a strong finishes to the season, and I hope I can do that again.

Q. The crowd was incredibly in favor of you. I’m wondering if that’s ever difficult emotionally, if you’re confused why no one is cheering for the other guy?
ROGER FEDERER: No. I take all the positives for myself, I must say. I don’t want to say comfortable, but it’s just so nice to feel that, you know, that they want you to get back in the match, they want you to win. They enjoy what they’re seeing. Feels like they’re getting their money’s worth.

I guess it’s entertainment to some extent, as well. It was a great battle, and I’m happy the people stayed after the rain delay and that they were right there when I needed them to the very, very end.

So of course there is a just a letdown and disappointment that I couldn’t push it 5-All, and then who knows what happens?

I should have never been down in the first place two sets to one and 5-2. That was a bummer there.

Q. With the half roof, was it louder than you have ever heard? Different noise at night now with the crowd?
ROGER FEDERER: Hard to say. They were unbelievable tonight. Were they better than ever? Possibly.

Was it louder than ever? Maybe. It was unreal.

But I have heard loud New York crowds before. (Smiling.) Yeah.

Q. You said something interesting on court. You said that a match like tonight’s match, you learned so much about your tennis and yourself. I know you just stepped off court, but can you reflect a little bit about that and what you did learn?
ROGER FEDERER: Well, I mean, usually you learn more when you lose just in the sense that you analyze them harder, deeper at times. Not always. Sometimes you just walk away and you forget about it.

But, you know, I think in especially best of five set matches, ones that exceed two-and-a-half, three-and-a-half hours, you go through some ups and downs naturally. You can’t play two perfect points every single time. Naturally you’re going to have to battle.

That’s where you learn a lot about your game, about your attitude, about your fitness. This is, I think, the longest match I have played all season. It was very interesting to see for me how I coped with it.

I’m very happy I had no problems, and I’m happy I’m putting in the hard work, you know, obviously aside from the matches, because the matches I have played this year have been really quick. I won’t see another best of five match some time except for next weekend.

Yeah, so I’m happy that I’m able to stay at a great level of play for a long period of time, because I’m match tough and I have worked very hard in the offseason, as well.

Q. (Indiscernible.)
ROGER FEDERER: I’m feeling confident doing it, you know. I think it was the right game plan. Just execution sometimes was missing in some crucial moments. But other than that, I think I played a good match.

Maybe I haven’t played this offensive for a very long time, and that’s maybe the reasons, as well, why maybe I was slightly shaky when it came to the crunch on the break points. Who knows?

Q. I didn’t hear the first question, but 19 break points out of 23 you missed; many with the forehand. Normally when we look at your stats your forehand is always the winning point. Tonight you were probably playing better on the backhand. Am I right? Am I wrong? How do you feel? How was it in your opinion?
ROGER FEDERER: Yeah. A lot of opportunities miss the. If it’s backhand, forehand, volleys, it doesn’t really matter at the end of the day.

I know why I lost the match very clearly the moment I sat down at 5-2 down in the fourth or after the match was over.

So something I will work on, and keep moving forward, you know. It’s no problem for me.

Q. When you say you know why you lost the match, is it just because of those mistakes or the reason why you made those mistakes?
ROGER FEDERER: Because of the mistakes I made. I have to get better at that. It’s just pretty simple.

Q. How well would you say Novak is playing now? How many majors…
ROGER FEDERER: I didn’t hear the end.

Q. How many major titles do you think he can win? He has 10 now.
ROGER FEDERER: I think he’s playing very well. Are you kidding me? I think he’s doing really well. He’s having a wonderful season, like in 2011. He’s just really consistent. Seems like there are not many guys that can hang with him, don’t have the tools or dare to go forward, or they aren’t dare to serve and volley against him because he’s so good on the return. Which he is. He’s perfected his game on the hard courts, no doubt about it.

He was always a great clay-court player, and because he moves as well as he does, he’s solid and consistent now on the grass.

To say the least, it’s very impressive. He’s having unbelievable career. You know, I think everybody knows that he knows that, as well. Tonight is another example of that.

Clearly he can win many of them. He already has a ton, so obviously he’s got to stay healthy and all that stuff and hungry, but obviously you would think he will win more after tonight.

Q. You did the SABR, of course. You were successful on four and didn’t win four. Pretty good. My question is: He obviously came up with some responses to it. How did you feel about how it went tonight and his response?
ROGER FEDERER: Well, I think it worked very well, and I’m sure I will use it more in the future against him and many others. It was a really interesting last few months or so looking at that tactic.

If you look at the points you probably have to win, you have to play them perfectly. So could have won even more so. Who knows? Maybe I should have played even more of it. I did get many more looks on the second serve as the match went on.

FastScripts Transcript by ASAP Sports

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Novak Djokovic Defeats Roger Federer for Second US Open Title and 10th Major

(September 13, 2015) Novak Djokovic entered the rarified air of the double-digit Grand Slam club on Sunday night when he defeated all-time major titles leader Roger Federer 6-4, 5-7, 6-4, 6-4 to win his second US Open title to raise his total of majors to ten. He is now seventh on the all-time majors list.

 

For Djokovic it was his third major title of the year, winning the Australian and Wimbledon titles earlier in the year. The Serbian became just the second player to win three majors in a year multiple times, he also did it in 2011. His opponent on Sunday, Roger Federer won three majors in 2004, 2006 and 2007. He has now evened his head-to-head record against the Swiss at 21-21.

Djokovic, 27-1 in majors this year, had his only loss come in the final of the French Open to another Swiss Stan Wawrinka.

Djokvic called it “an incredible season.”

“I have a tremendous respect for Roger and what his game is presenting to me and to any other player,” the 28-year-old Serbian said during the trophy presentation. “His level is always going to (get) the best out of you and that was needed from my side.”

“Being back in a final is where you want to be,” said Federer, who was playing his first US Open final since 2009. “Playing a great champion like Novak is a massive challenge.”

The start of the match was delayed by rain by three hours. Next year the US Open will have completed the roof over Arthur Ashe Stadium, so rain delays will not be an issue.

In addition to having to battle the 34-year-old 17-time major champion on the court, Djokovic had to contend with a very pro-Federer crowd.

In the third game of the first set, Djokovic fell on the court scraping skin off his hand, arm and knee. Yet he managed to do what few could during the fortnight against Federer – break his serve multiple times.

Federer’s 15 errors contributed to his demise in the first set.

In the second set, Federer appeared to be hitting the ball with more aggression. Federer won the set 7-5 breaking Djokovic’s serve after not taking advantage his first three set points in the 10th game.

The third set saw the momentum swing permanently, the world No 1’s way. Federer had two break points to go up 5-3 and failed to convert on either point. In the ninth game, Djokovic broke Federer’s serve for 5-4 and closed out the set to take a two sets to one lead.

 

The fourth set saw Djokovic break Federer twice to serve for the match at 5-2. Federer broke back and held for 4-5 and had break points again, Djokovic held him off for game, set and match.

Federer was 4 four for 23 on break point chances and hit 54 unforced errors. Total points won – Djokovic 147, Federer 145.

A bit of history was made in the umpire’s chair as Eva Asderaki-Moore became the first woman to officiate a US Open men’s singles final.

“I am very disappointed,” Federer said to media. “I had my chances on my racquet. I should never been down in the score the way I was. But Novak did a great job of fending them off, and, you know, all of that.
“It was a tough night, but still, I don’t know, thrilling at the same time.”

Reflecting on his season Federer said: “I am playing a good year, you know. I’m playing good tennis. I am happy with where my level is at. I’m able to be, you know, consistent, very consistent.

“I’m able to beat the best players regularly. Cincinnati obviously was a great feeling beating world No. 1 and world No. 2 in the same week. I don’t think I have done that before.

“And then of course it’s also disappointment. Lost too many times in finals. But at the same time, I did win my tournaments, the ones I was supposed to. The one I got I was very got happy the way I was playing. Year’s not over yet. I usually do have a strong finishes to the season, and I hope I can do that again.”

 

“I definitely am very proud of all of the achievements,” djokovic said. Winning Grand Slam is very special for any tennis player when you are dreaming of becoming a professional tennis player. When you are kind of finding that inspiration, motivation, these are the tournaments you dream of winning.

“So to actually relive these moments again after 2011 it’s quite incredible. To win against one of the biggest rivals, as you said, all-time Grand Slam champion, somebody that, you know, always keeps on fighting till the last point, keeps making you play an extra shot, yeah, all these things now are very special to me.

“Obviously I owe a great gratitude to my team and for making sure I can perform as well as I did, you know, all these years. And tonight is a night that I will definitely remember for a long time.”

“The season is not over, but the Grand Slam is over,” Djokovic said to media. “The biggest tournaments that I have played this year, as anybody else, and I won three out of four. It’s more than I could ask for, definitely.

“Of course I do have lots of expectations and high ambitions whenever I’m approaching the Grand Slams or any other tournament, but, you know, now actually sitting down here with this trophy and reflecting on what I have achieved, it’s quite incredible.

“So I’m definitely very satisfied and proud of that. As you said, you know, he played great tennis throughout the entire year. I think as the season was going by he was elevating his game. He was improving. Now he came up with a different shot, as well, the shot that nobody has ever seen.

“And it’s been working well also against me in Cincinnati and also here. He’s just not going away. He’s not dropping his level too much. You know, I was saying on the court that he’s always going to be out there making you play your best if you want to win.

“So that’s who Roger is. That’s why he has won so many Grand Slam titles.

“And I knew that coming to the court. I knew he’s going to be aggressive. He’s going to try to disrupt my rhythm, and he’s going to put a lot of variety in his game. slice, chip and charge, come to the net, serve and volley. Which he did.

But I was ready for it. I was ready for the battle. That’s what it was. Three hours, 20 minutes. We pushed each other to the limit, as we always do.

“It’s an ultimate challenge that I can have now winning against Roger back to back finals in Wimbledon and here, US Open. It’s tremendous. I’m really, really proud of it.”

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In Their Own Words – Flavia Pennetta and Roberta Vinci

 

U.S. OPEN

Saturday, September 12, 2015

Flavia Pennetta

Press Conference

F. PENNETTA/R. Vinci

7-6, 6-2

THE MODERATOR: Questions, please.

Q. Did it come a little more easily than you may have thought it was, today’s match?
FLAVIA PENNETTA: Not really. I mean, the first set was a little bit of drama. Both of us were starting really tight from the beginning. I mean, was not easy to play today with one of your best friends in the tour, with one you know since long time.

A lot of emotion coming together since yesterday. It’s not easy to handle everything. But I’m really happy, because the first set was really tough.

In the second one I started to play a little bit better, so I’m really proud of everything this week.

Q. What do you think you and Roberta proved to yourselves and proved to everybody?
FLAVIA PENNETTA: I think in woman’s Italian tennis now since already few years it’s really big, big moment for us in Italy and around the world.

So we just — I think we didn’t prove too much. I mean, we already proved during this year how we are, how good we are in what we are doing, how much heart we put all the time when we get in the court.

So it’s amazing to have the chance to play with one of your friends. Anyway, like before, like before the match we say doesn’t matter. We’re gonna win. It’s going to be a big win for both of us. It’s going to be a really big win for both of us.

It’s something amazing, something — I didn’t think to be here. She didn’t think neither to be here today. So it’s amazing for our country. Is amazing for everyone.

Q. Could you elaborate for us or explain that you are retired as of right now or you will play till the end of the year?
FLAVIA PENNETTA: No, no, I will play until the end of year, but was my last match here in New York.

Q. So what will you play now until the end of the year? You will not play the Olympics?
FLAVIA PENNETTA: For the moment it’s not on my goals.

Q. What will you play between now and the end of the year?
FLAVIA PENNETTA: I’m supposed to play Wuhan, Beijing. That’s the only two I supposed to play.

I think is gonna be the schedule the same. I don’t gonna change too much.

Q. Do you have a wedding date set?
FLAVIA PENNETTA: No. (Smiling.) Not yet.

Q. You’re playing so well. Why are you retiring?
FLAVIA PENNETTA: Ah, why? Because sometimes it’s getting hard for me to compete. This is the important point. When you are in the court, when you have to play 24 weeks in the year, you have to fight every week.

And if you don’t fight every week in the same way I did today, it’s gonna be like bad. For me, also. And I don’t feel to have this power anymore sometimes.

So this is the perfect moment, I think. Was a really hard decision to make, but I’m really happy that I did it. I’m really happy and proud of myself.

Q. You’re No. 6 now in the race to Singapore. Would you ever try to add maybe one more event if you needed to?
FLAVIA PENNETTA: Well, of course. If I have a chance, of course.

Q. When the Olympics came up, you kind of hedged a little. Is there room for you to change your mind and maybe…
FLAVIA PENNETTA: Not really. I mean, for the moment I’m so happy that I take this decision. I don’t feel — I don’t want to change nothing. I mean, I really think it’s the good way. You never know.

But for sure this one was the last New York for me. For sure.

Q. Does winning the US Open make it tougher to walk away from tennis or does it make it easier because you’re kind of going out on top?
FLAVIA PENNETTA: I mean, it will be the same. Winning or lose today, it was nothing going to change. The decision was already there. I think this is the best way that someone have — if I have to dream about how I want to finish, I want to stop playing, this is the perfect way.

Q. You told ESPN that you made your decision in Toronto.
FLAVIA PENNETTA: Yeah.

Q. Why was that the time that it was clear in your mind?
FLAVIA PENNETTA: Um, because I was doing — I had a bad moment also in Roland Garros where I was almost — three days before I was thinking to withdraw myself from the tournament.

And then I keep just trying and fight and everything was going pretty good. But when you starting to think too much, it’s the time like where you have to take like a decision, going or stop. You have to do that.

And sometimes we are more scared to take the decision because we don’t know what we like or we’re going to do after, how is going to be the life after.

But I think it’s going to be a pretty good life. I mean, I’m really proud of myself. I think I did everything that I expect. More. Much more. Much more, I can say.

I mean, it’s great to do that for me.

Q. So when you made your decision to retire, how many people did you tell?
FLAVIA PENNETTA: My team, my coach, my physio, my physical coach, my family, and Fabio.

Q. Next year now when you’re retired and back in Italy, when you will think back on this year’s US Open, what is the one word or the one phrase that would best capture this US Open?
FLAVIA PENNETTA: I think it’s today I have all the — not the problems, but, you know, you starting when you are really young and you make a lot of decision, hard decision to make. You lose so many things when you’re young.

I mean, with this, winning today, it’s — my life is perfect. (Smiling.) So I cannot say something different. Perfect.

Q. Why did you win today?
FLAVIA PENNETTA: Why?

Q. Why.
FLAVIA PENNETTA: Ah, because I was really consistent from the beginning of the match. I didn’t play my best tennis today. I have to say I was scared and tight from the beginning.

Was not easy for me to hit the ball in the same way that I did yesterday. Roberta was playing unbelievable. I mean, she was moving good and doing perfect things all the time, but in the second set she start to be a little bit tired.

So I was focused and try to push myself to do something more, to going for the match; the match point was perfect. I mean, I push, and I make it.

Q. What did the prime minister say to you after the match?
FLAVIA PENNETTA: I was so happy, so happy for us. He say, You don’t gonna understand what happen now in Italy. I mean, it’s good that you are here. He was talking with me and Roberta, because we was together. Because in Italy now is going to be crazy. It’s good to stay here a few days, just relax a little bit, and then go back home.

Q. What effect do you think your decision to retire had on the way you played and the way you were thinking, the way you were doing everything during this tournament?
FLAVIA PENNETTA: Sometime is getting in my mind, but I didn’t think too much about that. I was just focused on my game. I didn’t think, Oh, this is my last one, oh, this is my last one, oh, this is my last one.

No. I didn’t think at all like this. I just try to play every match, just play tennis. I don’t want to think what I gonna do after if I win or lose. Just play tennis. Go on court and play tennis. That’s was my goal in the last two weeks.

Q. So what do you think the biggest reason you were able to do all this is?
FLAVIA PENNETTA: Oh, well, I didn’t start really well the tournament. I have to say the first match was tough, the second one was easy, the score, but I was shaking so much. And when I have to go to the match with Niculescu, Cetkovska, I play so bad the first time I was in panic completely. I was panic attack. I cannot move. I cannot breathe. I cannot do nothing.

So maybe I’m here just because I’m trying. I was fighting a lot. Every point. Just point by point try to do my best all the time and suddenly it’s coming. I mean, yesterday was a perfect day, because I play really well.

And today I didn’t play so well, but enough to win. So I’m happy.

Q. You talked yesterday about getting very little sleep the night before my semifinals.
FLAVIA PENNETTA: Yeah, tonight I did not sleep at all.

Q. Not at all?
FLAVIA PENNETTA: No, a little bit, yes. From 1:00 to 8:00. That was good. Not bad.

Q. We’d like to have seven hours of sleep.
FLAVIA PENNETTA: (Laughter.)

Q. When did you tell Roberta? Was it when you were hugging at the net or sitting on the chairs?
FLAVIA PENNETTA: Sitting on the chairs.

Q. Is that when she hit you on the arm?
FLAVIA PENNETTA: Yeah.

Q. Because she couldn’t believe? What exactly did you say and what was her reaction?
FLAVIA PENNETTA: I told her, Roberta, this is my last New York. And she say, che? Che? Huh? I say, Yes. No way. (In Italian.) It’s perfect. Go. Go.

Q. You said on ESPN your night against Stosur was the one that maybe gave you the belief you could win the whole tournament.
FLAVIA PENNETTA: Well, not to believe that I can win the tournament, but at least I play my good tennis in that match, and so I starting to feel better and better.

Q. Did you receive any congratulations from Francesca Schiavone?
FLAVIA PENNETTA: Yes, of course.

Q. She’s a little bit part of your success because she was the first to win a Grand Slam.
FLAVIA PENNETTA: Of course. She send a messages to both of us, because we have chat with four of us. You cannot see this chat because it’s crazy. (Laughter.)

And then she send me like a voice message yesterday, and she starting to laugh, Ha ha, now it’s your turn. Breathe. You have to go to the toilet, eh, so many times? (Laughter.)

Francesca, she’s always like this. I didn’t talk to her now because I didn’t have the chance to take a phone — I just called my mom and my dad.

Q. A lot of people wouldn’t understand how the world 26 could play the 43rd ranked player in a Grand Slam final. I’m just curious what that says about the depth of women’s tennis, and do you think it gives belief to lower ranked players they can climb to the top?
FLAVIA PENNETTA: I mean, it’s happen because now I think the woman tennis, it’s a little bit — it’s not like 10 years ago where the top 10 was really high level.

I mean, it’s not that they are not more high level. It’s the one behind them they are coming stronger.

So now everything can happen. Yesterday, I mean, everyone knows Serena, she’s the best player. She’s supposed to win this tournament.

But sometimes also she can have a bad day. Yesterday for her was not a good day at all. Was a really good day for Robi, and she deserved to be here today. Was perfect for both of us.

Q. How much higher do I think that level is from, say, 10 years ago, from 1 to 50?
FLAVIA PENNETTA: Now from 11 to 100, it’s much harder than before, I think.

Q. You and Roberta go way back as friends. Did you actually live together when you were kids?
FLAVIA PENNETTA: Yeah, yeah. We spend four years or three years in a house together in the same room in Rome in the Italian Federation.

So we know each other really well. I mean, we have so many things in our life happening together. It’s funny to be here today, because we play the first match when we were nine years old in Brindisi, in my country club. So today was a really big day for both of us.

Q. How is she as a roommate? Neat? Clean?
FLAVIA PENNETTA: She’s perfect. (Laughter).

FastScripts Transcript by ASAP Sports

 

U.S. OPEN

Saturday, September 12, 2015

Roberta Vinci

Press Conference

F. PENNETTA/R. Vinci

7-6, 6-2

THE MODERATOR: Questions, please.

Q. Can you just tell us, what are your first memories of Flavia, your earliest memories of meeting her?
ROBERTA VINCI: That she beat me. (Smiling.) No, I’m joking.

I don’t know. We know each other for long time, so maybe when I saw her in my mind I remember all the moments that we spend together when I was young. But one thing, I don’t know.

Q. Was it on a tennis court, the first time you saw her, or…
ROBERTA VINCI: No, no, in the tennis court. In the tennis court, yes, yes.

Q. Do you remember where or what?
ROBERTA VINCI: Where, I don’t remember. Long time no.

Q. Can you share about the hug at the net, what she said to you…
ROBERTA VINCI: I cannot tell you.

Q. You have no idea?
ROBERTA VINCI: No, no.

Q. And also courtside what…
ROBERTA VINCI: No, I said to her, Congratulation, Well done, enjoy. You played better than me today, so.

That’s it. And she said, This is my last match on the US Open, so now I have to speak and tell to everyone that this is my last match.

I say, No. That’s it.

Q. What did you think at that moment? You must have been very shocked, I would imagine.
ROBERTA VINCI: When she said me that? Yeah. Was incredible. I didn’t expect that.

But just her choice, so it’s okay.

Q. What do you think the difference was today?
ROBERTA VINCI: I was tired. I was tired especially the first set.

I think she played better. She was more solid than me and she play much better backhand, long line, and she served better than me today.

She play better, yeah.

Q. What do you think this weekend means for the sport with all that has happened?
ROBERTA VINCI: I think it’s an incredible moment for all Italian people. So now when I come back at home, I can realize what we made, because now for me not is normal, no. But I’m in New York, okay, I’m in the hotel, just have fun, but I would like to come back and try to understood what I did.

Q. Do you still plan to make that 10:00 flight tonight or…
ROBERTA VINCI: (Laughter.) I have a private jet.

No, no, no, I don’t know. No, no, I don’t take 10:00.

Q. Will you celebrate with Flavia tonight?
ROBERTA VINCI: Maybe not. No, no, I don’t know. No, I don’t think so. Maybe. Maybe. I will ask, but I don’t know. I don’t know her program.

Q. You played the week before this event in New Haven, didn’t you?
ROBERTA VINCI: Si.

Q. Was that an advantage, to make a tournament before the US Open? Because I know a lot of players don’t play the week before.
ROBERTA VINCI: I like to play the week before the slam because I prefer to play — I prefer to play matches because I don’t like to practice one hour in the morning, okay, one hour in the afternoon. I prefer to play one match.

So, yeah, some players doesn’t like. They prefer to rest and practice, but I like to play. So it’s a good choice for me.

Q. Why the Italian women are much more successful than the men, Italian men?
ROBERTA VINCI: Aye. (Laughter) I don’t know. I don’t know. It’s a cycle. You know, sometimes the womens are better than the men, but now in Italy there are good men, good men Italian player.

Fognini, Seppi, they are good. Step by step. Now probably they will come better.

Q. What was it like playing in your first final, first slam final? What was the experience like being out there?
ROBERTA VINCI: I don’t know now. I don’t know. Maybe if you tell me this question in about more days, I can tell you.

But now it’s strange. I didn’t expect this. I’m so happy that I reach the final. Against Flavia is strange, but I’m really happy, yeah, even when I lost.

Q. Did you feel the raindrops? Were you hoping it would start raining and maybe you would get a break?
ROBERTA VINCI: When starts rain, I was 5-2 down and Love-30, so I say, two more points. (Laughter.)

So I say — No, no, I didn’t think nothing. No.

Q. What do you think the two of you proved to yourselves and proved to everybody else this weekend?
ROBERTA VINCI: (Speaking in Italian.) Miracles can happen.

Q. How about in English?
ROBERTA VINCI: What? Miracles can happen. Because I beat Serena, miracle. (Laughter.)

And then two Italian can reach the Grand Slam final, a miracle. Cycle miracle. And, bo…

One Italian player can win a Grand Slam.

Q. There is a famous fellow from your country, I think his name is Leonardo Da Vinci. Any connection?
ROBERTA VINCI: No. (Laughter.)

Q. How was his forehand?
ROBERTA VINCI: No, no, no. No, my uncle. No. (Laughter).

Non scrivere!

Q. Did you and Flavia talk before the match?
ROBERTA VINCI: Yes, yes, yes.

Q. As normal?
ROBERTA VINCI: In the gym, and about the time that we play maybe a little bit late. Normal thing.

Q. If you had played another opponent would your feeling be different? Not that you ever like to lose, but is it easier that you lost to your countrywoman and it was a great day for Italian tennis?
ROBERTA VINCI: (Through translation.) If you lost against Flavia, if you lost against Wozniacki, if you lost against Serena, always the same. You lost, no?

So now I’m happy that one Italian player won a Grand Slam. That’s for sure. But it’s normal. Nothing special.

Q. You said you had nerves yesterday against Serena.
ROBERTA VINCI: Si.

Q. Any today?
ROBERTA VINCI: Also today. Yeah, you know, it’s a final. I try my best. The beginning I was nervous, but also her. Was normal.

I try to, yeah, to play aggressive, but she play better. For me was tough. I was a little bit also tired and long point. I had such…

Q. It didn’t make it easier that it was a friend who you were playing?
ROBERTA VINCI: No. Is tough to play against one friend. I know Flavia for long time, so it’s difficult, especially mentally, mental.

Was difficult for both, I think. Not only for me.

Q. In the last day, what are the best reactions that you have received to what you did yesterday, both the match and your interview after?
ROBERTA VINCI: I receive a lot of congratulations about my interview, but my English is so bad. The press say, Congratulations, Good job. Because I beat Serena? No, for your interview. Grazie. Thank you.

I’m not joking. Is true. Thank you. I need to improve my English, eh?

Q. It was very good.
ROBERTA VINCI: No, no, no, not very good. But I can do it.

Q. How was the crowd different today than yesterday?
ROBERTA VINCI: No, the same. It was amazing. It was a lot of supports, a lot of people. The court is incredible. Is the best court I think in the Grand Slam. Center court is so nice.

Q. What did the it mean that the prime minister was there?
ROBERTA VINCI: It’s a good thing for us and also for I think Italian people is nice to see Renzi, Malagò, and Binaghi all there to support us.

Q. It’s been a great tournament for you. Why do you think you were able to do this at this point in your career?
ROBERTA VINCI: Well, maybe because I’m, yeah, I have a lot of experience. I had such result in the past; I had nothing to prove.

I’m almost at the end of my career, so I think I enjoy more the tennis and the practice and this life.

Q. Just to be clear, you’re not retiring?
ROBERTA VINCI: Maybe. No, no, no, no. Not yet (Smiling.) (In Italian.) Almost.

Q. Have you thought actively about retiring?
ROBERTA VINCI: Si. No, really. A lot of time during these years.

But, you know, I like to play tennis, so I have a passion and I work in art. Now I reach one final slam, so I’m happy.

Q. What are your emotions about all of this right now?
ROBERTA VINCI: About all?

Q. About everything. What are your emotions?
ROBERTA VINCI: I love New York. (Smiling.) Today probably this is my last cheeseburger, and then tomorrow pasta, real pasta at home.

But, no, I enjoy all the season, all the US Open season. I play so good. Yeah, my emotion are difficult to say, especially in English.

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Flavia Pennetta Wins US Open for First Major, Announces Retirement

(September 12, 2015) A 33-year-old won the US Open on Saturday, but not the woman most people were expecting. In an all-Italian final, 26th seed Flavia Pennetta defeated long-time friend, No. 43 Roberta Vinci 7-6 (4), 6-2 in Flushing Meadows to win her first major tournament – and her last.

Most people were expecting Serena Williams to be raising the trophy to complete winning all four majors in the dame year. Roberts Vinci crashed the Grand Slam party, by knocking out Williams in the semifinals on Saturday in one of the biggest US Open upsets. This stopped the world No. 1’s match winning streak at majors at 33, and halted her attempt to be the first woman since Steffi Graf in 1988 to win Grand Slam.

Pennetta shocked the audience in Arthur Ashe Stadium when she announced during the trophy ceremony, that she’s decided to call it a career.

“There’s one more thing I’d like to say – this is how I say goodbye to tennis,” Pennetta said. “I couldn’t think to finish in a better way.”
“It’s a dream come true,” said the champion. “When I was young, I was always thinking to be No.1 and win a Grand Slam. I also wanted to win Rome, but a Grand Slam is maybe a little better! But it’s a dream come true. It’s also nice to play with a friend of mine. Roberta played unbelievable. She had an incredible week.”

Pennetta clarified in her post-match news conference that she’s retiring at the end of the year and that this was her last US Open.

“I will play until the end of year, but was my last match here in New York,” she said. “I’m supposed to play Wuhan, Beijing. That’s the only two I supposed to play.”
“Winning or lose today, it was nothing going to change. The decision was already there. I think this is the best way that someone have — if I have to dream about how I want to finish, I want to stop playing, this is the perfect way.”

“The past 24 hours I’ve had a lot of things on my mind, and I was a little bit tired, especially in the first set,” Vinci said in her runner-up speech. “But I lost in the finals – I’m really happy, and of course really happy for Flavia.

“It’s tough to play against a player you’ve known for a long time, but I tried to do my best. Flavia just played unbelievable today. It was a great match, and I have to just say congratulations to her.”

At 33, Pennetta is the oldest woman in the Open Era to win a major for the first time, in a contest with Vinci who is 32. For both women, it was their first major final. This marked the first time in women’s tennis that two non-Top 20 seeds played each other in a major final.

In the first set, Pennetta led by a break at 4-2, when Vinci won the next three games to lead 5-4. Both women held their serve and Pennetta took the tie break 7-4. Pennetta rolled up a 4-0 lead, lost her serve for 4-1 and won two out of the next three games to seal the title.

“I mean, the first set was a little bit of drama,” Pennetta said. “Both of us were starting really tight from the beginning. I mean, was not easy to play today with one of your best friends in the tour, with one you know since long time.

“A lot of emotion coming together since yesterday. It’s not easy to handle everything. But I’m really happy, because the first set was really tough.

“In the second one I started to play a little bit better, so I’m really proud of everything this week.”

“Miracles can happen,” Vinci said. “Because I beat Serena, miracle.
“And then two Italian can reach the Grand Slam final, a miracle. Cycle miracle. And, bo…

“One Italian player can win a Grand Slam.”

In attendance at Arthur Ashe Stadium were Pennetta’s fiance – ATP player Fabio Fognini as well as the Italian Prime minister Matteo Renzi.

 

Players offered their congratulations to Pennetta on Twitter:

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