July 24, 2016

Johanna Konta Serves Her Way Into Her First WTA Final

Johanna Konta

Johanna Konta

By Curt Janka

(July 23, 2016) STANFORD, California – Johanna Konta lost just six points on her serve as she toppled Dominika Cibulkova 6-4, 6-2 in the first semifinal of the Bank of the West Classic. The win earns Konta her first WTA final and it’s the first time a British player has played for the trophy here since Virginia Wade in 1981.

Konta served a total of nine games and held at love for six of them. Cibulkova is arguably one of the better returners on tour, so what made Konta’s serve so tough today? “She was placing the serve so well and it was hard for me to do something with it,” the Slovak Cibulkova answered. “She was changing the directions of the serve, so that was the main thing. Today she was just serving too well.“

The British woman backed up her serve with solid ground strokes and returns, breaking her higher-seeded opponent three times. After the match, she was pleased with her performance. “I’m really happy to have come through that and to be into my first final,” Konta said. “I thought I served well and did a good job in the end of staying in the present. She [Cibulkova] is an incredible competitor, so I knew going into the match that I was going to have to be there for every single point. I achieved that, so I’m feeling very grateful and looking forward to my next match tomorrow.”

Konta was also playing in the doubles semifinal with her partner, Maria Sanchez, against Darija Jurak and Anastasia Rodionova. Then Konta can recover while Venus Williams and Alison Riske meet in the other singles semifinal.

 

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Venus Williams Playing Like The Top Seed She Is At The Bank Of The West Classic

Venus Williams

Venus Williams

By Curt Janka

(July 22, 2016) STANFORD, California –  A relaxed Venus Williams played composed tennis as she breezed to a 6-4, 6-1 win over 17-year-old wildcard Catherine Bellis at the Bank of the West Classic on Friday night. While it may have taken three sets for Williams to get by her previous opponent, there was no sign of tension in her play on Friday night. Experience may have been the key against her younger opponent.

When asked why she looked so at ease on the court she said, “I just felt like I had a lot of experience and as a young person she has to go for a lot more than I ever have to go for because I understand the game more. So I felt just comfortable that I could control the match.”

“After Wimbledon I was really pumped,” the 36-year-old Williams said. “I was like, ‘I can’t wait to play.’ That felt good. It felt good to be eager.”

When asked what else she is looking forward to this summer, the two-time Stanford winner replied, “There’s so much to look forward to! The semifinals tomorrow is like my main focus. The Olympics I’ve been waiting for four years. As soon as the last one was over I was ready to go again. It’s getting closer and it feels surreal but when I get there it’s gonna be real. And after that you just turn right back around and play the Open.”

CiCi Bellis

CiCi Bellis

Despite a quick second set, Bellis did make the first set very competitive. “I learned a lot,” she said. “I think mainly I just have to focus on the key points. There are a couple points in the first set that I think if I played a little bit more aggressive I could have won them. But, you know, she’s obviously the number one seed here, so it’s unbelievable to be on the court with someone like her.“

Asked about her short-term goals, Bellis smiled and said, “Yesterday, actually, I committed to Stanford. I’m just going to see how the next year goes in my pro career.” She explained that after another year on tour, she would start her college career at Stanford.

Top seed Williams will face Alison Riske in the semifinals on Saturday. Riske advanced when her quarterfinal opponent fourth seed Coco Vandeweghe suffered an ankle injury and had to retire.

In the bottom half of the draw, second seed Dominika Cibulkova came back from two early breaks to win 7-5, 6-0 over Misaki Doi. Cibulkova will next face third seed Johanna Konta, who beat her quarterfinal opponent, Zheng Saiai 6-2, 4-6, 6-3.

 

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Djokovic, Murray, Federer and Nadal Headline US Open Men’s Field

Novak Djokovic

NOVAK DJOKOVIC, ANDY MURRAY, ROGER FEDERER, RAFAEL NADAL

HEADLINE 2016 US OPEN MEN’S SINGLES FIELD

Field Features Five Former US Open Champions

and Includes the World’s Top 98 Men

From the USTA: White Plains, N.Y., July 20, 2016 – The USTA today announced that defending US Open champion and world No. 1 Novak Djokovic, world No. 2 and reigning Wimbledon champion Andy Murray, five-time US Open champion and world No. 3 Roger Federer, and two-time US Open champion and world No. 4 Rafael Nadal headline the men’s singles field for the 2016 US Open Tennis Championships. The field includes five former US Open singles champions, including Djokovic (2011, 2015), Murray (2012), Federer (2004-2008), Nadal (2010, 2013) and Marin Cilic (2014).

Each of the world’s top 98 men received direct entry into the US Open, representing 38 countries.

The 2016 US Open will be played Monday, August 29, through Sunday, September 11, at the USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center in Flushing, N.Y. The US Open Men’s Singles Championship is presented by Mercedes-Benz.

Djokovic,who has reached the singles final in Flushing five out of the last six years, leads the men’s field as the world No. 1 and defending US Open champion. The Serbian won his 12th major championship at the French Open in June to complete the “Career Grand Slam,” and held all four major titles until Sam Querrey ended his 30-match win streak at Grand Slams in the third round at Wimbledon.

Murray, of Great Britain, won his third major and second Wimbledon title this month after finishing runner-up to Djokovic in this year’s Australian and French Open finals. Murray, the reigning Olympic Gold Medalist, defeated Djokovic in the 2012 US Open final to win his first Grand Slam championship.

Federer, of Switzerland, is the all-time leader with 17 major singles titles, and was bidding for his eighth Wimbledon title this summer before falling to Milos Raonic in the semifinals. Federer is competing for his sixth US Open title, which would surpass Pete Sampras and Jimmy Connors for the most US Open men’s singles titles in the Open Era.

Nadal, of Spain, is a 14-time Grand Slam champion who won his 69th career ATP World Tour title in Barcelona this April. He has not played competitively since withdrawing from the French Open in June with a wrist injury.

Also included in the men’s singles field are: No. 5 Stan Wawrinka, of Switzerland, the 2014 Australian Open and 2015 French Open champion; No. 6 Kei Nishikori, of Japan, a 2014 US Open finalist; No. 7 Milos Raonic, of Canada, who reached his first Grand Slam singles final at Wimbledon this month; No. 8 Tomas Berdych, of the Czech Republic, a former world No. 4 and 2016 Wimbledon semifinalist; No. 9 Dominic Thiem, the 22-year old Austrian talent; No. 10 Jo-Wilfried Tsonga, of France; No. 11 David Goffin, of Belgium; and No. 12 Marin Cilic, the 2014 US Open champion.

Canadian Vasek Pospisil, ranked No. 98, is the last man to receive direct entry into the field of 128. Six players used a protected ranking to gain entry, including Nos. 39 Julien Benneteau, of France, and Janko Tipsarevic, of Serbia, No. 56 Brian Baker, of the United States, No. 81 Thanasi Kokkinakis, of Australia, No. 89 Dmitry Tursunov, of Russia, and No. 94 Jerzy Janowicz, of Poland. Sixteen more players will gain entry through the US Open Qualifying Tournament, held August 23-26, while the eight remaining spots are wild cards awarded by the USTA.

American men who received direct entry are No. 16 John Isner, of Greensboro, N.C., No. 25 Steve Johnson, of Orange, Calif., No. 26 Jack Sock, of Lincoln, Neb., No. 29 Sam Querrey, of Las Vegas, No. 56 Brian Baker, of Nashville, Tenn., No. 57 Donald Young, of Atlanta, and No. 67 Taylor Fritz, of Rancho Santa Fe, Calif.

Argentina’s Juan Martin del Potro, the 2009 US Open champion, is entered as an alternate and would be making his first appearance at the US Open since 2013.

Among the players competing in the US Open Qualifying Tournament will be the winner of the seventh annual US Open National Playoffs – Men’s Championship, held during the Emirates Airline US Open Series’ Connecticut Open in New Haven, Conn., prior to the US Open Qualifying Tournament. The USTA created the US Open National Playoffs in 2010 to allow players 14 and older, regardless of playing ability or nationality, to vie for a spot in the US Open Qualifying Tournament via one of 15 sectional qualifying tournaments.

The July 18 edition of the Emirates ATP Rankings was used to determine the US Open main draw entry list. Seeds will be determined and announced closer to the start of the event.

The 2016 US Open will mark the culmination of the Emirates Airline US Open Series, the North American summer season of seven ATP World Tour and WTA events that began this week in Stanford, Calif.

The US Open is the highest-attended annual sporting event in the world. 2016 marks the second year of an 11-year partnership between the USTA and ESPN, which will see the US Open carried on the ESPN family of networks through 2025. During this year’s US Open, ESPN and ESPN2 will combine to air nearly 130 hours of live match play with more than 1,200 hours of first-to-last ball coverage to be seen on ESPN3 on WatchESPN, which will also be available via the US Open website – USOpen.org.  In the continued expansion of its US Open coverage, ESPN will feature play from up to 12 courts.

US Open tickets can be purchased: at USOpen.org; by calling Ticketmaster at 1-866-OPEN-TIX; and at all Ticketmaster outlets.

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Six-Time Champion Serena Williams Leads 2016 US Open’s Women’s Field

WORLD NO. 1 AND SIX-TIME CHAMPION SERENA WILLIAMS LEADS 2016 US OPEN WOMEN’S SINGLES FIELD AND VIES TO WIN RECORD 23RD GRAND SLAM

Fourteen U.S. Women Receive Direct Entry into the Main Draw –

the Most of Any Country and the Most Since 2004

Field Includes Four Former US Open Singles Champions – Serena Williams,

Venus Williams, Samantha Stosur and Svetlana Kuznetsova

From the USTA: White Plains, N.Y., July 20, 2016 – The USTA today announced that world No. 1 and six-time US Open champion Serena Williams leads the women’s singles field for the 2016 US Open Tennis Championships. Williams is joined by 101 of the world’s top 103 women, including 2016 Australian Open champion and world No. 2 Angelique Kerber, 2016 French Open champion and world No. 3 Garbiñe Muguruza, two-time US Open champion and world No. 7 Venus Williams, 2015 US Open finalist Roberta Vinci, 2014 US Open finalist Caroline Wozniacki, and former US Open champions Samantha Stosur and Svetlana Kuznetsova.

In total, 37 different countries are represented in the women’s field. Fourteen U.S. women received direct entry into the main draw – the most of any country and the most direct entries for American women since 2004 when there were 15 entries.

The 2016 US Open will be played Monday, August 29, through Sunday, September 11, at the USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center in Flushing, N.Y. The US Open Women’s Singles Championship is presented by J.P. Morgan.

Leading the entry list is world No. 1 Serena Williams, who won her sixth US Open crown in 2014, tying her with Chris Evert for the most US Open women’s singles titles in the Open Era. At this year’s US Open, Williams is looking to break the record for the most Grand Slam singles titles in the Open Era. At Wimbledon, Williams tied Steffi Graf for the most major titles when Williams won her 22nd Grand Slam singles title.  

Joining Williams in the field’s top four are world No. 2 Kerber, of Germany, who defeated Serena Williams in the Australian Open final this year and also reached the 2016 Wimbledon final; No. 3 Muguruza, of Spain, the 2016 French Open champion and 2015 Wimbledon finalist; and No. 4 Agnieszka Radwanska, of Poland, the first Polish player to reach a Grand Slam singles final (2012 Wimbledon) and a 2016 Australian Open semifinalist.

Rounding out the top 10 entries are: No. 5 Simona Halep, of Romania, the 2014 French Open finalist and 2015 US Open semifinalist; No. 7 Venus Williams, of the United States, who won the US Open in 2000 and 2001 and is a seven-time Grand Slam singles champion; No. 8 Roberta Vinci, of Italy, who reached her first Grand Slam final at the US Open last year at age 32; No. 9 Carla Suárez Navarro, of Spain, a five-time Grand Slam quarterfinalist, who reached the US Open quarterfinals in 2013; No. 10 Svetlana Kuznetsova, of Russia, the 2004 US Open champion and 2009 French Open champion; and world No. 11 Madison Keys, of the United States, a 2015 Australian Open semifinalist, who debuted in the Top 10 last month after winning her second career WTA title.

World No. 6 and two-time US Open singles finalist Victoria Azarenka will not be competing in this year’s US Open after announcing her pregnancy last week. 2006 US Open champion Maria Sharapova, ranked No. 97 this week, will also not compete due to an ITF anti-doping provisional suspension, which is currently under appeal.

Nine players who have won Grand Slam singles titles in their careers are competing in the US Open this year, including two-time Wimbledon champion Petra Kvitova (2011, 2014), former world No. 1 and 2008 French Open champion Ana Ivanovic, of Serbia, and 2010 French Open champion Francesca Schiavone, of Italy.

Belarus’ Aliaksandra Sasnovich, ranked No. 103, is the last player accepted directly into the women’s field of 128. Azarenka and Sharapova are the only withdrawals. Three players are using a special ranking to gain entry into the main draw – No. 27 Peng Shuai, of China, No. 64 Galina Voskoboeva, of Kazakhstan, and No. 91 Vitalia Diatchenko, of Russia. Sixteen more players will gain entry through the US Open Qualifying Tournament, August 23-26, while the remaining eight spots are wild cards awarded by the USTA.

In addition to Serena Williams, Venus Williams, and Keys, the other American women who received direct entry into this year’s tournament include: No. 23 Sloane Stephens, of Coral Springs, Fla., No. 35 Coco Vandeweghe, of Rancho Santa Fe, Calif., No. 52 Varvara Lepchenko, of Allentown, Pa., No. 55 Madison Brengle, of Dover, Del., No. 57 Shelby Rogers, of Charleston, S.C., No. 63 Christina McHale, of Englewood Cliffs, N.J., No. 69 Louisa Chirico, of Harrison, N.Y., No.  70 Irina Falconi, of West Palm Beach, Fla., No. 71 Nicole Gibbs, of Santa Monica, Calif., No. 78 Alison Riske, of Pittsburgh, and No. 101 Samantha Crawford, of Tamarac, Fla.

Several of the young Americans listed above have had breakout performances on the WTA tour this year. Stephens, 23, won three WTA titles this year (Auckland, Acapulco, and Charleston); Vandeweghe, 24, won her second career WTA singles title in ‘s-Hertogenbosch; and Rogers, 23, advanced to her first-ever Grand Slam quarterfinal at the French Open. 

Among the players competing in the US Open Qualifying Tournament will be the winner of the seventh annual US Open National Playoffs – Women’s Championship, held during the Emirates Airline US Open Series’ Connecticut Open in New Haven, Conn., prior to the US Open Qualifying Tournament. The USTA created the US Open National Playoffs in 2010 to allow players 14 and older, regardless of playing ability or nationality, to vie for a spot in the US Open Qualifying Tournament via one of 15 sectional qualifying tournaments.

The July 18 edition of the WTA rankings was used to determine the US Open main draw entry list. Seeds will be determined and announced closer to the start of the event.

The 2016 US Open will mark the culmination of the Emirates Airline US Open Series, the North American summer season of seven ATP World Tour and WTA events that began this week in Stanford, Calif.

The US Open is the highest-attended annual sporting event in the world. 2016 marks the second year of an 11-year partnership between the USTA and ESPN, which will see the US Open carried on the ESPN family of networks through 2025. During this year’s US Open, ESPN and ESPN2 will combine to air nearly 130 hours of live match play with more than 1,200 hours of first-to-last ball coverage to be seen on ESPN3 on WatchESPN, which will also be available via the US Open website – USOpen.org.  In the continued expansion of its US Open coverage, ESPN will feature play from up to 12 courts

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USTA Names U.S. Olympic Tennis Team

USTA Shield Logo

From the USTA: WHITE PLAINS, N.Y., July 15, 2016 — The USTA, the governing body for the sport of tennis in the United States, today announced the 12-player U.S. Olympic Tennis Team roster for the 2016 Olympic Games in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, August 5-21.

 

U.S. women’s tennis coach Mary Joe Fernandez nominated six players with four singles entries and two doubles teams. The 22-time Grand Slam singles champion Serena Williams will compete in the singles competition along with Madison Keys and Sloane Stephens, both making their Olympic debut, as well as Venus Williams, who will be competing in her fifth Olympics.In doubles, Serena Williams, the reigning singles gold medalist, and sister Venus Williams will look to remain undefeated in Olympic doubles competition as they seek their fourth gold medal (2000, 2008, 2012). They will be joined by first-time Olympians Bethanie Mattek-Sands and CoCo Vandeweghe in the doubles draw.

 

U.S. men’s tennis coach Jay Berger also nominated six players, including four singles entries and two doubles teams. Four American men will make their Olympic debuts, asSteve Johnson, Jack Sock, Denis Kudla and Brian Baker each will play singles. Bob Bryan and Mike Bryan, the reigning gold medalists in men’s doubles,will return to the Olympics as a U.S. doubles team, with Johnson and Sock making up the other U.S. doubles pairing.

 

The U.S. will later announce its two teams in mixed doubles – which will be contested at the Olympics for the second time since tennis returned to the Games in 1988 – comprised from among the 12 players already named, once all players are in Rio.

 

The 2016 Olympic Games will be held August 5-21 in Rio with the tennis competition being staged August 6-14 at the Barra Tennis Center. The U.S. has won 21 Olympic medals in men’s and women’s tennis since it returned as a full medal sport in 1988 – more than any other nation.

 

“The USTA is extremely proud of the 12 athletes who have worked countless hours on and off the court to earn the opportunity to represent the United States at the Rio Games,” said Katrina Adams, USTA Chairman, CEO and President. “It’s going to be an exciting time for the eight first-time Olympians and for the four returning gold medalists.  I’m looking forward to watching them compete as they look to claim gold.”

 

Serena Williams, 34, is the reigning singles gold medalist and a three-time gold medalist in doubles (2000, 2008, 2012). She also was a singles quarterfinalist in her only other Olympic singles appearance in 2008. By winning the Olympic gold medal in singles and again in doubles in 2012, Williams became the first player ever to complete the career Golden Slam in singles and doubles (winning all four Grand Slam events and the Olympic gold medal in a career). Williams is a 22-time Grand Slam singles champion, tying  her with Steffi Graf for second on the all-time list, two behind Margaret Court.  Serena also has captured 14 Grand Slam doubles titles and two mixed doubles titles. She is one of six women in history to have held the No. 1 rankings in both singles and doubles simultaneously and finished 2015 as the No. 1 player in the world for the fifth time.  Williams holds a 16-1 record in Fed Cup play, including 13-0 in singles, and she helped the U.S. capture the 1999 Fed Cup title. Williams is ranked No. 1 in the world.

 

Venus Williams, 36, holds four Olympic gold medals and will become the first American tennis player to compete in five Olympic Games. She captured the gold medal in singles in 2000 and won gold medals in doubles with her sister Serena in 2000, 2008, and 2012. She is a seven-time Grand Slam champion, including five Wimbledon titles, and has won 14 Grand Slam doubles titles and two mixed doubles titles. She also has ranked No. 1 in both singles and doubles. Williams posted her first Top 10 season since 2010 last year, winning three WTA titles and reaching the quarterfinals at the Australian Open and US Open. In 2013, she re-entered the Top 20 for the first time since being diagnosed with Sjogren’s Syndrome, an autoimmune disorder, following the 2011 US Open. Williams is 23-4 in Fed Cup competition, including 19-2 in singles, and she helped lead the U.S. to the 1999 title. Williams is ranked No. 7 in the world.

Keys, 21, will make her Olympic debut on the heels of breaking into the Top 10 for the first time this June, becoming the first American to debut in the Top 10 since Serena Williams in April 1999.  Keys won her second WTA singles title in June at the grass-court Aegon Classic, played in Birmingham in Great Britain. With the title, Keys peaked at No. 9 in the world. Keys advanced to her first career Grand Slam semifinal at the 2015 Australian Open, where she upset No. 4 seed Petra Kvitova and No. 18 seed Venus Williams. This year, Keys reached the fourth round of the Australian Open and the French Open. She captured her first WTA title at the grass-court event in Eastbourne, Great Britain in 2014, and in 2011, she became the youngest player to win a main draw match at the US Open since Nicole Vaidisova in 2005. Keys has played in three Fed Cup ties for the U.S. with a 3-3 overall record (2-2 in singles, 1-1 in doubles). She is ranked No. 11 in the world.

 

Stephens, 23, is making her Olympic debut and has won three WTA titles this year in Charleston, S.C., Auckland, and Acapulco. She won her first WTA title last year in Washington D.C. Stephens’ breakout came at the 2013 Australian Open, where she defeated Serena Williams en route to the semifinals. At 19 years, 10 months, 3 days old, Stephens was the youngest American to reach a Grand Slam singles semifinal since Williams reached the 2000 Wimbledon semifinals at 18 years, 9 months, 8 days old. Stephens also advanced to the quarterfinals of Wimbledon in 2013 to peak at No. 11 in the world that October. Stephens has played in four Fed Cup ties for the U.S., and is ranked No. 23 in the world.

Vandeweghe, 24, is making her Olympic debut and won her second WTA singles title this year in ‘s’Hertogenbosch, Netherlands (she also won that title in 2014). The following week, she advanced to the semifinals of the WTA event in Birmingham, Great Britain, to reach No. 29 in the world. Vandeweghe also has had success in doubles, advancing to the semifinals at the 2015 US Open and the quarterfinals at the 2016 Australian Open. She also won her first WTA doubles title this year in Indian Wells with her Olympic doubles partner Mattek-Sands. Vandeweghe, also a U.S. Fed Cup player, is ranked No. 35 in the world.

Mattek-Sands, 31, is a veteran on the WTA Tour, but is making her Olympic debut. She is ranked in the Top 10 in doubles and swept back-to-back doubles titles in Indian Wells (with Vandeweghe) and Miami (with Lucie Safarova) this year for her 18th and 19th WTA doubles titles. In 2015, Mattek-Sands won the Australian Open and French Open women’s doubles titles (with Safarova) and the French Open mixed doubles title (with Olympian Mike Bryan). At the 2012 Australian Open, Mattek-Sands teamed with Horia Tecau to win her first Grand Slam title in mixed doubles. In singles, Mattek-Sands has played in 14 US Opens and reached the fourth round of Wimbledon in 2008 and the French Open in 2013 for her career-best Grand Slam results. In 2011, she was ranked a career-high No. 30 in the world in singles before being sidelined by a rotator cuff injury. Mattek-Sands holds a 5-0 record in Fed Cup doubles and a 2-6 record in singles, playing in seven ties. She is ranked No. 12 in the world in doubles.

 

Johnson, 26, is making his Olympic debut. He is ranked a career-high No. 29 in the world after winning his first ATP singles title this June in Birmingham, Great Britain. Last year, Johnsonreached his first career ATP final in Vienna in October, while reaching three additional ATP semifinals.Johnson also made his debut for the U.S. Davis Cup Team in 2015 against Uzbekistan, winning the doubles rubber with Sam Querrey after the duo advanced to the US Open doubles semifinals together. Johnson turned pro in 2012 after completing an outstanding college tennis career at the University of Southern California, winning the 2011 and 2012 NCAA singles championships and leading the Trojans to team titles all four years he played for the school. Following USC, Johnson reached the third round of the 2012 US Open, becoming the first reigning NCAA champion to advance to the third round of the men’s singles since Sargis Sargisian in 1995. He is ranked No. 25 in the world.

 

Sock, 23, is making his Olympic debut. He reached the final of the ATP events in Auckland and Houston earlier this year and reached a career-high No. 22 in the world this January. Sock won his first ATP singles title in 2015 in Houston and his career-best Grand Slam result came when he reached the fourth round of the 2015 French Open. Sock also has thrived in doubles, winning the 2014 Wimbledon doubles title and the 2015 Indian Wells crown with Vasek Pospisil and peaking at a career-high No. 6 in the doubles rankings in May 2015. He also reached the doubles quarterfinals of the 2015 French Open and 2016 Australian Open.  Sock made his Davis Cup debut in September 2015 in the World Group Playoff in Uzbekistan, where he won both of his singles matches to keep the U.S. Davis Cup team in the World Group for 2016. Sock also competed in the Davis Cup first round this March in Australia and was named to the team for this year’s quarterfinal against Croatia. He is ranked No. 26 in the world.

 

Kudla, 23, is making his Olympic debut and was one of the last direct entries into the Olympics. Kudlaearned a wild card into Wimbledon in 2015 and reached the fourth round for his career-best Grand Slam singles result. In summer 2015, he reached the semifinals of the Emirates Airline US Open Series event in Atlanta (his best ATP result) and qualified for both Cincinnati and Montreal. This year, Kudla won his first-round match at the Australian Open and won matches at the ATP events in Indian Wells, Miami, Houston, and Madrid. Kudla holds six USTA Pro Circuit singles titles and four doubles titles. He was ranked No. 3 in the world junior rankings and reached the boys’ singles final at the 2010 US Open. He is ranked No. 102 in the world.

 

Baker, 31, used a protected ranking to compete in the Olympics this year. He has played on the professional tennis circuit since 2001 and has had numerous successes, but also numerous injuries. At the 2013 Australian Open, Baker retired in his second-round match due to a knee injury and played in just three more tournaments that year (the last being the US Open), having knee surgery in 2014.  In 2012, Baker reached his first-ever ATP final in Nice, France, and advanced to the fourth round of Wimbledon. He also won three singles titles on the USTA Pro Circuit in 2012, including the $50,000 Challenger in Savannah, Ga., to climb nearly 400 spots in the ATP rankings and into the Top 60. Baker also was a standout junior, peaking at No. 2 in the ITF World Junior Rankings in 2003 after reaching the boys’ singles final at the French Open. He is ranked No. 546 in the world and used a protected ranking to make the Olympic team.

 

Bob and Mike Bryan, 38, will make their fourth consecutive Olympic appearance. The brothers captured a gold medal in men’s doubles at the 2012 Olympic Games in London, as well as a bronze medal in men’s doubles in 2008. Together, they own 16 Grand Slam men’s doubles titles. Bob has won seven mixed doubles titles, while Mike has won four mixed doubles titles, including the 2015 French Open with Mattek-Sands. The Bryans own a record 112 ATP World Tour doubles titles together and ended 2014 as the No. 1-ranked doubles team in the world for a record 10th time in 12 years. Bob and Mike are 24-4 together in doubles when playing for the U.S. Davis Cup team and are the all-time winningest doubles team in U.S. Davis Cup history. They also helped lead the U.S. to the 2007 Davis Cup title. Bob has one additional doubles win in Davis Cup with Mardy Fish in 2010.  Mike has two additional doubles wins in Davis Cup in 2008 and 2012. Bob is ranked No. 3 in the world in doubles, while Mike is ranked No. 4.

 

Venus and Serena Williams are the last American women to win Olympic gold in tennis, with Serena winning the singles gold medal and the sisters capturing the gold in women’s doubles at the 2012 Olympic Games in London. Andre Agassi was the last American man to win Olympic gold in men’s singles when he defeated Spain’s Sergi Bruguera in the gold medal match at the 1996 Olympics in Atlanta. The U.S. has not won gold in mixed doubles since 1988.

 

Tennis was part of the Olympic program from the first modern Olympiad in 1896 until 1924.  After a 64-year hiatus, tennis returned to the official Olympic program in 1988, becoming the first sport to feature professional athletes.

 

Team nominations were made by the USTA’s Olympic Oversight Committee and are subject to approval by the United States Olympic Committee and the International Tennis Federation.

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Isner, Sock and the Bryan Brothers Named to U.S. Davis Cup Team for Quarterfinal Tie Against Croatia in Beaverton, Oregon

USDavisCup

 

WHITE PLAINS, N.Y., July 5, 2016 – The USTA and United States Davis Cup Captain Jim Courier today announced that top-ranked American and world No. 17 John Isner, world No. 26 Jack Sock and 16-time Grand Slam doubles champions Bob Bryan and Mike Bryan will represent the U.S. in the 2016 Davis Cup by BNP Paribas World Group Quarterfinal against Croatia. The best-of-five match series will be played on a temporary outdoor hard court at the Tualatin Hills Tennis Center, July 15-17, in Portland, Ore.

Croatia’s Davis Cup Captain Zeljko Krajan nominated No. 13 and 2014 US Open champion Marin Cilic, No. 50 Borna Coric, Ivan Dodig, who is ranked No. 15 in doubles, and Marin Draganja, who is a former Top 20 doubles player, to his team.

Play begins at 11:30 a.m. PT on Friday, July 15, and Sunday, July 17. Play begins on Saturday at 1:30 p.m. PT. Friday will include two singles matches featuring each country’s No. 1 player against the other country’s No. 2 player. Saturday’s schedule features the pivotal doubles match. And the final day of play on Sunday features the two “reverse singles” matches, when the No. 1 players square off, followed by the No. 2 players meeting each other in the final match. All matches are best-of-five sets until one nation clinches the tie. A revised schedule for Sunday may take place if a team clinches in the third or fourth match.

Tickets are available and may be purchased by visiting www.usta.com/daviscup or by calling 888-484-USTA (8782). Prices for single-day tickets for Friday, Saturday, or Sunday range from $40 to $175 per day. The USTA has partnered with the Oregon Sports Authority to bring this event to the Portland area. The USTA has also partnered with tie sponsors Delta Air Lines, Comcast Business, Nike, and the City of Beaverton, along with the following tie suppliers North American Breweries, The Juice Plus+ Company, Ponzi Vineyards and Beaverton Honda

Croatia holds a 3-0 record over the United States in Davis Cup, one of only three countries that hold a winning record over the U.S. The U.S. last faced Croatia in the 2009 World Group Quarterfinal and also faced them in 2003 and 2005. This will be the United States’ first home tie since 2014. The U.S. is 111-18 all-time in Davis Cup ties played at home.

The winner of this match advances to the World Group Semifinal, held September 16-18, for a chance to compete for the 2016 Davis Cup title.

Isner, 31, is ranked No. 17 in the current world rankings and will be competing in his 12th Davis Cup tie; he is 10-9 in singles and 2-0 in doubles. His last Davis Cup appearance came this year in the first round in Melbourne, Australia, where Isner won both of his singles matches. His biggest Davis Cup victory came in 2012, when he defeated Roger Federer in the U.S. Davis Cup team’s first-round win at Switzerland. The tallest player in U.S. Davis Cup history, at 6-foot-10, Isner made his Davis Cup debut in the 2010 World Group First Round in Serbia, where he became the first U.S. player since 2003 to compete in three live rubbers in the same tie. He also represented the U.S. in the 2012 London Olympics, reaching the quarterfinals before losing to Federer. Isner turned pro after an outstanding four-year career at the University of Georgia, leading the Bulldogs to the 2007 NCAA team title as a senior. He holds 10 career tour singles titles, the last of which came in Atlanta during the 2015 Emirates Airline US Open Series. So far this year, he has reached the fourth round of the Australian Open and the French Open and the semifinals of the ATP clay-court event in Houston. 

Sock, 23, is ranked No. 26 in the world. He made his Davis Cup debut in September 2015 in the World Group Playoff in Uzbekistan, where he won both of his singles matches to keep the U.S. Davis Cup team in the World Group for this year. Sock also competed in the Davis Cup first round this March in Australia. He reached the final of the ATP events in Auckland and Houston earlier this year and won his first ATP singles title in 2015 in Houston. Sock has also thrived in doubles, winning the 2014 Wimbledon doubles title and the 2015 Indian Wells crown with Vasek Pospisil and peaking at a career-high No. 6 in the individual doubles rankings in May 2015; he also reached the doubles quarterfinals of the 2015 French Open and 2016 Australian Open. In 2011, Sock won the US Open mixed doubles title with fellow American Melanie Oudin.

Bob and Mike Bryan, both 38, hold a 24-4 doubles record together in U.S. Davis Cup competition; the 24 wins are first all-time in U.S. Davis Cup history for a tandem. Bob and Mike, the only brothers to pair in victory for the U.S. Davis Cup team, hold the all-time Open era record of most Grand Slam men’s doubles titles (16) and ATP doubles titles (112). In addition, the Bryan brothers won the gold medal in doubles at the 2012 Olympics in London, where they completed a career Golden Slam by winning all four Grand Slam titles and an Olympic gold medal. The Bryans ended 2014 as the No. 1-ranked doubles team in the world for a record 10th time in 12 years.

Overall, Bob holds a 25-4 doubles record in Davis Cup competition; he is also 4-2 in singles (all dead rubbers). Mike holds a 26-4 record in Davis Cup doubles matches, playing without Bob just twice in his Davis Cup career. Bob did not compete in the 2012 first-round match at Switzerland due to the birth of his daughter, Micaela; in that case, Mike teamed with Mardy Fish to defeat 2008 Olympic doubles gold medalists Federer and Stanislas Wawrinka to clinch the tie. Mike also partnered with Fish in the 2008 semifinal against Spain. Bob played without Mike (food poisoning) in the 2010 first round in Serbia, partnering instead with Fish.

Additionally, U.S. Captain Jim Courier announced the practice partners for the U.S. Davis Cup team—former junior standout Tommy Paul and University of Illinois alum Jared Hiltzik. Paul, 19, won the 2015 French Open junior singles title, becoming the sixth American ever to win the title, and also reached the final of the junior US Open in 2015. He peaked at a career-high No. 3 in the ITF World Junior Rankings in fall 2015. As a pro, Paul captured his first career USTA Pro Circuit singles at the $10,000 Futures events in Plantation, Fla., and Sunrise, Fla., this year. Hiltzik, 21, graduated this year from the University of Illinois, where he earned three All-America honors—one of three players in program history to ever do so—and  finished his collegiate career as the eighth-winningest singles player in program history with 115 wins. He also reached the quarterfinals of the NCAA tournament as a junior in 2014. Hiltzik won his first USTA Pro Circuit doubles title this year at the Collegiate Series event in Winston-Salem, N.C., and reached his first USTA Pro Circuit singles final last year at the $15,000 Futures in Godfrey, Ill.

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USTA Names 2016 U.S. Paralympic Wheelchair Tennis Team

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(June 27, 2016) WHITE PLAINS, N.Y.  – The United States Tennis Association (USTA) and U.S. national wheelchair tennis team coach Dan James today announced the eight players who will represent the United States in the 2016 Paralympic Games in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, Sept. 9-16.

The U.S. will be one of 29 countries, represented by the 100 wheelchair tennis competitors from around the world, vying for gold in the men’s, women’s and quad events. The competition will take place at the Barra Tennis Center, the same venue used for the Rio 2016 Olympic tennis event.

“The USTA is extremely proud of the group of wheelchair tennis athletes who will represent the United States at this year’s Paralympic Games,” said Katrina Adams, USTA Chairman, CEO and President. “These athletes never stop to amaze me in all they can do within their sport. They truly embody the honor of being named a Paralympian. I’m looking forward to watching them compete as they look to claim gold.”

The men’s team will be led by Jon Rydberg (Woodbury, Minn.) and Steve Baldwin (San Diego).

The women’s team will feature Emmy Kaiser (Ft. Mitchell, Ky.), Dana Mathewson (San Diego) and Kaitlyn Verfuerth (Flagstaff, Ariz.).

The quad team, led by three-time doubles gold medalists David Wagner (Hillsboro, Ore.), and Nick Taylor (Wichita, Kan.), will also include second-time Paralympian Bryan Barten (Tucson, Ariz.). Wagner, who is currently the world No. 2 in singles and No. 1 in doubles, will be hoping to capture the illustrious gold medal in men’s quad singles at the Paralympics for the first time. Wagner won silver in singles at the Paralympics in 2004 and 2012.

Direct entries are based on ITF World Rankings from May 23, 2016. Similar to the wild-card rule at other tennis tournaments, the U.S. wheelchair tennis team has been granted Bipartite slots by the International Paralympic Committee (IPC). Bipartite slots allow the Paralympic event to allocate additional slots to countries competing in the events. Rydberg, Baldwin, Verfuerth and Barten were all granted Bipartite slots to compete in Rio.

Coach Dan James, of Seattle, will be assisted at this year’s Paralympics by assistant coach Jason Harnett, of Irvine, Calif., as well as team leader Emily Sandor, of New York.

This year’s Paralympic Games mark the seventh time wheelchair tennis will be part of the competition, and the fourth time the quad division will be included. The quad team of Wagner and Taylor won consecutive gold medals in doubles at the 2012 Games in London, 2008 Games in Beijing, and 2004 Games in Athens, Greece.

Wheelchair tennis was introduced to the Paralympic program in 1988 as an exhibition event before becoming a full medal sport at the 1992 Paralympic Games in Barcelona, Spain. Paralympic tennis is an open competition, eligible to those athletes with a mobility-related disability. All competitors must compete in a wheelchair. More than 4,200 elite athletes with physical disabilities from around the world are expected to compete in the 2016 Paralympic Games.

The USTA was officially designated by the United States Olympic Committee (USOC) as the national governing body for the Paralympic sport of wheelchair tennis in June 2002, becoming the first Olympic national governing body to earn this recognition. As the national governing body for wheelchair tennis, the USTA manages wheelchair tennis in the United States, including the sanctioning of tournaments, overseeing wheelchair rankings, creating and managing a High Performance program for developing elite disabled athletes, and selecting teams to compete internationally for the United States.

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Mary Joe Fernandez and Jay Berger Named Coaches of 2016 U.S. Olympic Tennis Team

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WHITE PLAINS, N.Y., June 23, 2016 – The USTA, the national governing body for the sport of tennis in the U.S., today announced that U.S. Fed Cup captain Mary Joe Fernandez and USTA Player Development Head of Men’s Tennis, Jay Berger, have been named, respectively, as the women’s and men’s coaches of the 2016 U.S. Olympic Tennis Team.  In addition, Dan James, Head U.S. National Wheelchair Team Coach, has been named coach of the U.S. Paralympic Wheelchair Tennis Team.

The 2016 Olympic Games will be held August 5-21 in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, with the tennis competition being staged August 6-14 at the Barra Tennis Center. The 2016 Paralympic Games will be held September 7-18 with the tennis competition scheduled for September 9-16 at the same venue.  

“Each of the coaches who have been chosen to lead our U.S. teams has outstanding credentials and have proven themselves as great leaders and motivators,” said Katrina Adams, USTA Chairman, CEO and President. “The Olympics and Paralympics provide a magnificent stage for us to showcase the very best of tennis, and we are extremely fortunate to have Mary Joe, Jay, and Dan serve as coaches for our teams—and ambassadors for our sport—as we go for the gold in 2016.”

“To be able to represent the U.S. for a fourth time at the Olympics is a tremendous honor,” said Fernandez, 1992 & 1996 Olympic Doubles Gold Medalist.  “I’m excited and looking forward to helping the top American women as they look to capture medals in Rio.”  

“It’s the greatest honor to represent the United States, especially for the third time at the Olympics,” said Berger.  “I am looking forward to working with the guys in Rio and know the team is excited to climb up on the medal podium.”

“I could not be more proud to be coaching these great athletes and to be representing Team USA once again,” said James.  “The Paralympic Games are an amazing event as they offer these athletes the opportunity to showcase their sport and be seen by millions of fans around the world.”

The 2016 U.S. Olympic Tennis Team will consist of up to six men and six women, with a maximum of four men and four women competing in the singles competition and a maximum of two men’s and two women’s teams competing in doubles. The U.S. also will be able to place a maximum of two teams in the mixed doubles competition, which will be contested at the Olympic Games for just the second time.  The Olympic Tennis Team player nominations are made using the ATP World Tour and WTA rankings as of June 6.  The U.S. Olympic nominations are under the review of the ITF and will be formally announced in the coming weeks pursuant to the ITF’s Qualifications and Appeals timeline.

The United States has won 21 Olympic medals in men’s and women’s tennis—more than any other nation—since the sport returned as a full medal sport in 1988.  U.S. players have won 15 medals at the Paralympic Games, including the gold medal every year in the Quad doubles division since that event’s inception in 2004.

The 2016 U.S. Paralympic Wheelchair Tennis Team will consist of a maximum of four men and four women in the wheelchair singles competition, with no more than two doubles teams in the wheelchair doubles competition.  In the quad wheelchair competition, a maximum of three players may compete in the event, with a maximum of three in the singles event and one team in the doubles event. Team nominations will be based on ITF Wheelchair Tennis World Rankings as of May 23, 2016. The Paralympic team will be announced the week of June 27.

It will be the seventh time that wheelchair tennis has appeared at the Paralympic Games as a full medal sport, having made its debut as a demonstration sport at Seoul 1988. Wheelchair tennis was fully admitted to the Paralympics at Barcelona 1992, where men’s and women’s singles and doubles were contested. After further successful events at Atlanta 1996 and Sydney 2000, the quad class was introduced at Athens 2004. Paralympic tennis is an open competition, eligible to those athletes with a mobility-related disability. All competitors must compete in a wheelchair.

The USTA was officially designated by the USOC as the national governing body for the Paralympic sport of wheelchair tennis in June 2002, becoming the first Olympic national governing body to earn this recognition.  As the national governing body for wheelchair tennis, the USTA manages wheelchair tennis in the United States, including the sanctioning of tournaments, overseeing the ranking systems, creating and managing a High Performance program for developing elite disabled athletes and coaches. 

All athlete and staff nominations to the 2016 U.S. Olympic and Paralympic teams are subject to approval by the United States Olympic Committee.

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On The Call with Venus Williams

Venus Williams

Venus Williams

(June 15, 2016) New York, NY – Venus Williams held a media conference call on Wednesday to discuss summer plans and her participation in the Bank of the West Classic tournament, part of the Emirates Airline U.S. Open Series. Also on the call were Vickie Gunnarsson, Tournament Director, Bank of the West Classic and J. Wayne Richmond, General Manager, Emirates Airline US Open Series.

UNITED STATES TENNIS ASSOCIATION MEDIA CONFERENCE

BRENDAN McINTYRE: Hello, everyone. Thank you for joining us today on the call. A special thank you to Venus Williams, who is joining us today after recently committing to play in the 2016 Bank of the West Classic, marking her 13th appearance in Stanford, which includes an impressive seven appearances in the singles final, capturing two titles.

The Bank of the West Classic, a WTA Tour event, will launch the Emirates Airline US Open Series again this year, beginning on July 18th.

I’d also like to welcome to the call Bank of the West Classic tournament director, Vickie Gunnarsson; and Emirates Airline US Open Series manager, J. Wayne Richmond.

At this time I’m going to turn it over to J. Wayne for a few remarks.

J. WAYNE RICHMOND: I’ll make this very brief.

As we kick off year 13, I wanted to thank the Bank of the West and the WTA Tour for doing this call with us, but more importantly Venus, to you, for taking the time to do this call. We know you have a lot on your schedule getting ready for Wimbledon.

It hit me this morning looking at this that, Venus, you were the very first final we ever broadcast in 2004 on the series from Stanford. It’s kind of a perfect fit to have you on this call. Thank you for being part of it.

I’ll turn it over to Vickie Gunnarsson from Bank of the West.

VICKIE GUNNARSSON: Hello, everybody. Great to have everyone on the call. We appreciate your support. Thanks to the media for attending. A special thank you to Venus for taking the time to participate.

We are excited to once again be the starting event of the Emirates Airline US Open Series. We have a great player field at the Bank of the West Classic this year, highlighted by Venus, of course, and Aga Radwanska. But overall 13 out of 20 players on our acceptance list have won at least one career WTA title, and many will represent their countries at the Olympics. We expect this year’s tournament to be highly competitive.

This is the 46th year of the tournament. But more importantly, this is Bank of the West’s 25th year as our title sponsor. They are an amazing partner and a great supporter of women’s tennis.

So thank you to everyone for participating on the call. Hopefully we’ll see you in Stanford.

BRENDAN McINTYRE: At this time we’ll open up the call for questions.

Q. Venus, I’m wondering if there’s any sort of additional challenge when it comes to figuring out the right way to schedule your summer during an Olympic year.
VENUS WILLIAMS: Additional challenges? Absolutely because the Olympics is such a highlight, but at the same time it’s important to play tournaments so you can continue with success on the tour.

Also for me it’s making sure I have a little bit of a break. This year I’ve been very successful. I will be starting out with Stanford, Bank of the West, then playing one more event, then heading off to Rio is my plan.

Q. Venus, I would like your comment on the young American players who are coming up, possibly their chances at Wimbledon. You and Serena are going to be clearly leading the American charge, but we have CoCo Vandeweghe who played some very good tennis lately, and Madison Keys. Are you encouraged by the fact there might be some young players, Sloane Stephens in the mix, too, to follow in your steps as a great Wimbledon player?
VENUS WILLIAMS: Yeah, absolutely. The surface at Wimbledon has changed a lot since I first started. It’s a lot more forgiving, so it gives a lot of players more opportunity to be able to adjust quicker to the grass. Hopefully we’ll be able to see that with the young Americans.

But they’ve been playing really well, especially this year. That’s great news for obviously the Olympic team and Fed Cup and all of the above. It’s pretty exciting prospects.

Q. Venus, you’ve gone through different ways of prepping for the Olympics. Back in 2004 you played some tournaments before. The last couple you’ve kind of gone in straight from Wimbledon. Talk about what it meant to play tournaments leading into the Olympics, and then did you feel like it has any effect not playing events before the last couple Olympics?
VENUS WILLIAMS: You know, it’s kind of hard to remember because it happens every four years. So I don’t really remember how I felt or what tournaments I played four years ago.

But I do know that, no matter what, at the Olympics you got to figure out a way to play your best, no matter what the circumstances, because it only happens every four years.

Thankfully for me, I have a lot of experience. That will help me out in the long run.

Q. Venus, since your diagnosis several years back, you’ve played a lot of tennis, and recently some very good tennis. Has it gotten a lot easier for you to manage it? Have you found some new ways to manage it? Is there a way that you can keep yourself healthy more easily than you were at first?
VENUS WILLIAMS: Yeah, I mean, of course the first couple years are really tough because there’s no road map. There’s no one who says, This is how you do it, this is how you manage it. It’s challenging.

But I’ve always wanted to rise to the challenge and the occasion. That’s not how I see it, as a disadvantage, but a challenge I’ve had to overcome.

I’m always looking for different ways that I can be at my best, whether it’s eating, resting, different training regimens, whatever it may be.

It’s definitely a constant search. I never give up.

Q. Venus, this part of the season, playing on the North American hard courts, what is your favorite thing about it? Also, as a player, what does it mean to have a series of tournaments like this package for you to play?
VENUS WILLIAMS: Yeah, it’s great to play at home in front of the home crowd. That’s the highlight. Being at home, being able to just play in the U.S., and there’s not as many opportunities as there was when I first started to play in the U.S., so it’s become really special at this point. It really becomes the last opportunity to do so until March. I really cherish that.

I love hard courts. A lot of people think my favorite surface is grass, but actually I grew up on hard courts, so I prefer that. I feel right at home on it.

Q. Venus, can you talk about how important it is for you to have the series as a preparation for the US Open.
VENUS WILLIAMS: Yeah, absolutely. Coming in, of course, you want to come in strong, playing a lot of matches, hopefully winning titles. It gives you confidence going into such a big event as the US Open.

But even if you don’t win, you’re able to hone your game, work through mistakes or chinks in your armor.

Unfortunately, as much as you train, there’s always something to work on. It gives you the opportunity to figure out, What do I need to perfect at this moment in time?

Q. We saw your dress that you’re going to be wearing in Rio. I wanted to ask a little bit about that in terms of the inspiration. Aside from needing the red, white and blue, what else inspired you? Also, what tips do you have for the newbies going into the Olympics about trading pins?
VENUS WILLIAMS: Well, the dress, my dress at the Olympics is always inspired by Wonder Woman. Each and every Olympics it’s Wonder Woman as the inspiration. It never changes.

Second, trading pins, you know, it’s definitely about trading pins, but once you start trading pins, you find out it’s about meeting people. That experience of meeting somebody you’ll maybe never see again, but the connection you have with them, the joy you have from meeting them, that is the best part of it all. It’s an interesting byproduct that you don’t expect. Then you have your pins for memories when you look back to remember those times at the Olympics. That’s awesome as well.

Q. With the Wonder Woman inspiration, are you going to have gold wristbands or is that too much?
VENUS WILLIAMS: I should. I’ll probably do a special Olympic hair, though. Maybe I’ll come back with colored hair. I haven’t done that in a while.

BRENDAN McINTYRE: Thanks, everyone, again for getting on the call. A special thank you to Venus. We look forward to the start of the Emirates Airline US Open Series at the Bank of the West Classic starting on July 18th.

FastScripts Transcript by ASAP Sports

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USTA Girls’ 16s and 18s To Take Place August 6-14 in San Diego

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(June 15, 2016) San Diego, Calif.  – The United States Tennis Association Girls’ 16s & 18s National Championships are scheduled to be played August 6-14, 2016 at the Barnes Tennis Center, located at 4490 W. Point Loma Blvd, San Diego, CA, 92107.

Nearly 400 girls aged 16 and 18 and under will compete for the title of National Champion, as well as a wild card entry into the Women’s Singles main draw of the US Open (for the 18s Champion) and a wild card into the US Open Junior Championships (for the 16s Champion). The 18s Doubles Champions will also receive a wild card into the US Open Women’s Doubles main draw.

“Nearly every American on today’s women’s professional tennis tour has played in this tournament. It’s been amazing to watch past participants such as Madison Keys, Sloane Stephens, Shelby Rogers and Coco Vandeweghe advancing in their pro careers,” said Co-Tournament Director Ellen Ehlers. “The Girls’ 16s &18s Nationals gives fans a great opportunity to watch stars of the future.”

The Girls’ 16s event will begin on Saturday, Aug. 6 and conclude with the singles and doubles finals on Saturday Aug. 13. The Girls’ 18s tournament will get underway on Sunday, Aug. 7 and conclude with the 18s singles championship on Sunday, Aug. 14. Both divisions will feature 192-player singles draws and doubles draws with 96 teams. The starting time for each day will be announced in July.

The Opening Ceremony for the USTA National Girls’ 16s & 18s National Championships is scheduled for 5 p.m. on Saturday, Aug. 6 at the Barnes Tennis Center. The guest speaker will be former tennis professional Gigi Fernandez, who won 17 Grand Slam doubles titles and was inducted into the International Tennis Hall of Fame in 2010.

Early-round matches will also be played at secondary sites at San Diego State University’s Aztec Tennis Center, 5375 Remington Rd., San Diego, CA, 92115, from Saturday, Aug. 6 through Tuesday, Aug. 9 and University of San Diego’s Skip and Cindy Hogan Tennis Center, 5998 Alcala Park, San Diego, CA 92110, from Sunday, Aug. 7 through Wednesday, Aug. 10.

Admission and on-site parking at the Barnes Tennis Center is free each day of the tournament. For fans watching matches at SDSU and USD, admission is free, but there is a nominal charge for on-campus parking. University parking regulations will be strictly enforced.

A complete player list will be available in early July. To view the official tournament website, please go to: http://www.ustagirlsnationals.com/.

About USTA Girls’ 16s – 18s Nationals:
The USTA Girls’ 16 & 18s National Championships are the premiere hard court tennis tournaments for amateur and professional American girls aged 18 and 16 and under in the United States. In 2010, both age groups began playing their events concurrently at San Diego’s Barnes Tennis Center. Tournament participants, who represent nearly every state in the United States, have been endorsed by their respective USTA Section or have received USTA special exemptions based on their results in qualifying tournaments, junior rankings, or results on the WTA Tour or International Tennis Federation Junior Circuit. Past tournament champions include Chris Evert, Tracy Austin, Andrea Jaeger, Zina Garrison, Mary Jo Fernandez, Jennifer Capriati and Lindsay Davenport.

 

 

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