June 28, 2017

Wimbledon Seeds Announced

(June 28, 2017) The Championships, Wimbledon has announced the seeds. They are as follows:

THE CHAMPIONSHIPS 2017

EVENT 1: GENTLEMEN’S SINGLES

1 MURRAY, Andy (GBR)

2 DJOKOVIC, Novak (SRB)

3 FEDERER, Roger (SUI)

4 NADAL, Rafael (ESP)

5 WAWRINKA, Stan (SUI)

6 RAONIC, Milos (CAN)

7 CILIC, Marin (CRO)

8 THIEM, Dominic (AUT)

9 NISHIKORI, Kei (JPN)

10 ZVEREV, Alexander (GER)

11 BERDYCH, Tomas (CZE)

12 TSONGA, Jo-Wilfried (FRA)

13 DIMITROV, Grigor (BUL)

14 POUILLE, Lucas (FRA)

15 MONFILS, Gael (FRA)

16 MULLER, Gilles (LUX)

17 SOCK, Jack (USA)

18 BAUTISTA AGUT, Roberto (ESP)

19 LOPEZ, Feliciano (ESP)

20 KYRGIOS, Nick (AUS)

21 KARLOVIC, Ivo (CRO)

22 GASQUET, Richard (FRA)

23 ISNER, John (USA)

24 QUERREY, Sam (USA)

25 RAMOS-VINOLAS, Albert (ESP)

26 JOHNSON, Steve (USA)

27 ZVEREV, Mischa (GER)

28 FOGNINI, Fabio (ITA)

29 DEL POTRO, Juan Martin (ARG)

30 KHACHANOV, Karen (RUS)

31 VERDASCO, Fernando (ESP)

32 LORENZI, Paolo (ITA)

 

EVENT 2: GENTLEMEN’S DOUBLES

1 KONTINEN, Henri (FIN) and PEERS, John (AUS)

2 HERBERT, Pierre-Hugues (FRA) and MAHUT, Nicolas (FRA)

3 MURRAY, Jamie (GBR) and SOARES, Bruno (BRA)

4 KUBOT, Lukasz (POL) and MELO, Marcelo (BRA)

5 BRYAN, Bob (USA) and BRYAN, Mike (USA)

6 DODIG, Ivan (CRO) and GRANOLLERS, Marcel (ESP)

7 KLAASEN, Raven (RSA) and RAM, Rajeev (USA)

8 BOPANNA, Rohan (IND) and ROGER-VASSELIN, Edouard (FRA)

9 ROJER, Jean-Julien (NED) and TECAU, Horia (ROU)

10 HARRISON, Ryan (USA) and VENUS, Michael (NZL)

11 LOPEZ, Feliciano (ESP) and LOPEZ, Marc (ESP)

12 CABAL, Juan Sebastian (COL) and FARAH, Robert (COL)

13 MARTIN, Fabrice (FRA) and NESTOR, Daniel (CAN)

14 MERGEA, Florin (ROU) and QURESHI, Aisam-Ul-Haq (PAK)

15 PERALTA, Julio (CHI) and ZEBALLOS, Horacio (ARG)

16 MARACH, Oliver (AUT) and PAVIC, Mate (CRO)

 

 

EVENT 3: LADIES’ SINGLES

1 KERBER, Angelique (GER)

2 HALEP, Simona (ROU)

3 PLISKOVA, Karolina (CZE)

4 SVITOLINA, Elina (UKR)

5 WOZNIACKI, Caroline (DEN)

6 KONTA, Johanna (GBR)

7 KUZNETSOVA, Svetlana (RUS)

8 CIBULKOVA, Dominika (SVK)

9 RADWANSKA, Agnieszka (POL)

10 WILLIAMS, Venus (USA)

11 KVITOVA, Petra (CZE)

12 MLADENOVIC, Kristina (FRA)

13 OSTAPENKO, Jelena (LAT)

14 MUGURUZA, Garbine (ESP)

15 VESNINA, Elena (RUS)

16 PAVLYUCHENKOVA, Anastasia (RUS)

17 KEYS, Madison (USA)

18 SEVASTOVA, Anastasija (LAT)

19 BACSINSZKY, Timea (SUI)

20 GAVRILOVA, Daria (AUS)

21 GARCIA, Caroline (FRA)

22 STRYCOVA, Barbora (CZE)

23 BERTENS, Kiki (NED)

24 VANDEWEGHE, Coco (USA)

25 SUAREZ NAVARRO, Carla (ESP)

26 LUCIC-BARONI, Mirjana (CRO)

27 KONJUH, Ana (CRO)

28 DAVIS, Lauren (USA)

29 KASATKINA, Daria (RUS)

30 ZHANG, Shuai (CHN)

31 VINCI, Roberta (ITA)

32 SAFAROVA, Lucie (CZE)

 

EVENT 4: LADIES’ DOUBLES

1 MATTEK-SANDS, Bethanie (USA) and SAFAROVA, Lucie (CZE)

2 MAKAROVA, Ekaterina (RUS) and VESNINA, Elena (RUS)

3 CHAN, Yung-Jan (TPE) and HINGIS, Martina (SUI)

4 BABOS, Timea (HUN) and HLAVACKOVA, Andrea (CZE)

5 HRADECKA, Lucie (CZE) and SINIAKOVA, Katerina (CZE)

6 SPEARS, Abigail (USA) and SREBOTNIK, Katarina (SLO)

7 GOERGES, Julia (GER) and STRYCOVA, Barbora (CZE)

8 BARTY, Ashleigh (AUS) and DELLACQUA, Casey (AUS)

9 CHAN, Hao-Ching (TPE) and NICULESCU, Monica (ROU)

10 DABROWSKI, Gabriela (CAN) and XU, Yifan (CHN)

11 ATAWO, Raquel (USA) and OSTAPENKO, Jelena (LAT)

12 GROENEFELD, Anna-Lena (GER) and PESCHKE, Kveta (CZE)

13 FLIPKENS, Kirsten (BEL) and MIRZA, Sania (IND)

14 BERTENS, Kiki (NED) and LARSSON, Johanna (SWE)

15 KLEPAC, Andreja (SLO) and MARTINEZ SANCHEZ, Maria Jose (ESP)

16 HOZUMI, Eri (JPN) and KATO, Miyu (JPN)

 

Wimbledon begins on Monday July 3 and runs through July 16.

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On The Call – ESPN/ Wimbledon Conference Call with Chris Evert and Brad Gilbert

 

 

ESPN Tennis Analyst Brad Gilbert

 

ESPN / Wimbledon Conference Call with Chrissie Evert, Brad Gilbert

ESPN’s Exclusive Coverage Begins Monday; All Day Every Day

 

(June 27, 2017) ESPN tennis analysts Chrissie Evert and Brad Gilbert spoke with media Tuesday, previewing Wimbledon.  ESPN’s exclusive coverage – from first ball to last ball – begins Monday, July 3, with 140 hours on TV and 1,500 on ESPN3 and streaming live on the ESPN App with action from all 15 televised courts.  The action will climax with the Ladies’ Championship and the Ladies’ and Gentlemen’s Doubles Championships on ESPN on Saturday, July 15, and the Gentlemen’s Championship on Sunday, July 16, followed by the Mixed Doubles Championship.   Highlights of the call, followed by the full transcript:

 

Soundbites:

On:  Two-Time Champ Kvitova’s Recovery from Playing Hand Stabbing in December

  • I’m very surprised…For her to win the tournament in Birmingham was awesome.  To me, she is the best grass court player that is playing at Wimbledon…she is the one that I think everybody has to look out for…If she can get through the first couple of rounds, which are always a little bit dangerous for any top player…she’s my favorite.” – Evert

 

On:  The Really, Really Wide Open Women’s Field

  • I said that at least 30 women could win the French, and I wouldn’t even have put Ostapenko’s name on the 30 because she hadn’t won a WTA tournament.  I will double down and say that 40 women — 40 women — could win Wimbledon. The field, without a doubt, is the clear favorite on the women’s side.” – Gilbert

 

On:  The 15-Year Stranglehold “The Big Four” Have on the Gentlemen’s Championship

  • I cannot see anybody outside (The Big Four) beating three of those guys to win it…I just think that’s the most difficult thing.  If there is some help in the draw, a couple guys happen to lose, there’s an opening in the draw, maybe there’s a possibility. But you’re probably in the 90 percentile minimum of one of those four guys winning.” – Gilbert
  • You got some dangerous players that could upset one of those top four. I just don’t know if they can do it consistently.  It’s like a brick wall, I think, to get through those four players.” – Evert

 

  1. What you make of Petra Kvitova’s return from what happened to her in December? Are you surprised how quickly she’s been able to find a top level of play? Do you consider her a serious title contender at Wimbledon, given her past success there?
    CHRISSIE EVERT: I’m very surprised. I’m very surprised only because when you take that much time off, you have to anticipate some rustiness. I was very surprised even with Sharapova when she came back. That was a much longer time.  For her to come back, and I thought it was a wise choice for her to play the French, get that match or those matches out of the way, get the rustiness out of the way, get all the press out of the way, and sort of make the road clear for her to play on her best surface, which is grass. For her to win the tournament in Birmingham was awesome.  To me, she is the best grass court player that is playing at Wimbledon. Seeing that there are not too many, if any, grass court specialists in the tournament, she is the one that I think everybody has to look out for.

    If she can get through the first couple of rounds, which are always a little bit dangerous for any top player, because you don’t know the conditions of the court, your opponent might be hot. If she can get a few matches in the first week of the tournament, she’s my favorite. She’s definitely up there.  So happy for her. I think that was such a scare that she went through, it’s made her just appreciate the game a lot more. She’s certainly more relaxed. You can tell by her press conferences, the way she speaks, she’s just happy to be out there. That’s just freeing her up to play her best tennis.  Fortunately for her, she’s coming back at a time when she’s playing on her favorite surface, the two Grand Slams she’s won. It’s looking good for her right now.

    BRAD GILBERT: In her second tournament back, I think it was a great effort. I think I read she still doesn’t have full use of a couple of her fingers on her hand. Obviously she’s made the adjustments to figuring out what she needs to do holding the racquet.  I mean, two favorites I’ll put out are her and Venus. Very much like I said in the French on the conference call, I think Chrissie remembers it, I said that at least 30 women could win the French, and I wouldn’t even have put Ostapenko’s name on the 30 because she hadn’t won a WTA tournament.  I will double down and say that 40 women – 40 women – could win Wimbledon. The field, without a doubt, is the clear favorite on the women’s side.

    Q. What type of women’s player would be successful on today’s tour? You have someone like Ostapenko who hits the ball big, Kerber is a little more defensive. Brad said 40 women could win. What type of player do you see winning the title at Wimbledon? On the men’s side, we’ve written about Frances Tiafoe. Is he on track, based on the hype and expectation? He hasn’t broken through. What does he need to do to really get to that next level?
    BRAD GILBERT: I’ll start with Frances.  Frances has made really good progress athletically, movement-wise, and on challengers. He’s had zero success so far on the tour level. I believe he’s won two matches on the tour level this year. So that’s where it starts.  Obviously other young players like Zverev, Khachanov, Coric, have won a lot of matches tour level. So that’s where it’s got to start for him, start winning a couple matches at tour events, a couple matches in a slam, then he can start making progress.  I think he at this point is the most far along of the young Americans. Like I said, he’s only won a few tour matches this year. He’s got to have a little more success at that level. But I like the progress he’s made.

    What type of player on the women’s side? Obviously in general there’s more successful players that play hard and flat. Still a lot more women play hard and flat than with a lot more spin. But I do think a lot of times it depends a little bit on the court at Wimbledon. If you have hot and warm conditions, you get a higher bounce, the courts play a little quicker. It’s a little easier to play all-around tennis and defend.  If it’s cool and damp, the ball bounces a lot lower, so it’s a lot tougher to defend. I think it does depend on the surface a little bit. But in general I do think that the bolder players stand a better chance on grass than players that defend.

    CHRISSIE EVERT: If the power of Ostapenko won on red clay, certainly (she has) the power has to win on grass. That’s even more magnified. Before you could have a counter-puncher winning the French Open. Nowadays, if you look at the past few years, it’s the power that’s winning the French Open, which is the slowest surface.  Certainly Wimbledon, it’s that many times over that it’s got to be, to me, a power player. Pliskova, we’re not really even talking about her, but look how well she did at the French with a big serve and those big groundies, and that’s her worst surface. You got to give her a shot really with winning a lot of free points off her serve, if her serve’s on.

    We talked about Venus. We talked about Kvitova. We talked about Ostapenko. They’re all power players. The one outsider that I wouldn’t count out is Halep. I feel like Halep is still sort of on the verge and on the cusp of winning a Grand Slam. Maybe that loss at the French will tilt her enough to know she can’t be passive when she’s winning. She’s got to be able to play more aggressively on the big points to close the matches. Hopefully that’s a big, big lesson.  She let that match slip through her fingers because she wasn’t aggressive enough. Maybe she’ll have a second life, come back. She’s a beautiful ball-striker. She does have a big first serve when she uses it and she has confidence. She’s the only outsider I think as far as being a counter-puncher that I would think has a chance to win.

    When I look at Pliskova, Venus, Petra, and Ostapenko, the jury is out. How is that French Open win going to affect her? How many times have we seen this before?  A first-time Grand Slam winner, then they fizzle. Will she be able? Is she so young, sort of free and easy and aggressive, that she’s just not even going to think about it, she’s going to go on to that next level and keep hitting out with that freedom. That remains to be seen how she’s going to react from winning the French Open. But she certainly has the power.  That’s my answer.

    Q. Do either of you see anybody outside of the group that’s won every Wimbledon title for the past 14 years – Federer, Djokovic, Nadal, Murray – who outside of them would you give a chance of winning the title, or will one of them win it yet again?
    BRAD GILBERT: Considering all of them have won multiple times since 2003, Hewitt would be the last person outside of that to win. I think obviously a lot depends on the draw. Until we see the draw, would they bump up Roger from 5, how far they bump him up.  I think realistically somebody outside of that, obviously Stan has never made it past the quarters. I would think for that to happen, you know, a couple guys have to lose. I cannot see anybody outside beating three of those guys to win it. Somebody having an amazing run, beating three of those guys. Let’s say Cilic has to beat three guys. Somebody ranked 15. I just think that’s the most difficult thing.  If there is some help in the draw, a couple guys happen to lose, there’s an opening in the draw, maybe there’s a possibility. But you’re probably in the 90 percentile minimum of one of those four guys winning.

    CHRISSIE EVERT: Yeah, I agree. I think there’s, like, a 90% chance to me one of those four guys will win. My outside danger players would be Stan. He has Paul Annacone now in his corner. It’s not a lot of time to sort of tweak your game that much. But Stan’s got to be more aggressive. If he gets into an aggressive frame of mind, there’s a possibility. He’s an outsider. Kyrgios is always dangerous, but mentally I don’t know if he can put together a lot of wins in a row yet, seven.  Raonic is a question mark. Zverev. I mean, you got some dangerous players that could upset one of those top four. I just don’t know if they can do it consistently.  It’s like a brick wall, I think, to get through those four players.

    BRAD GILBERT: You talked about Zverev there. To me the potential is there. I need to see his draw first. The big thing is, you know, he’s never made a quarters yet of a slam. Physically and mentally, until you’ve put yourself in the position to be able to win a slam, it’s hard to just say, Oh, okay, that’s going to happen.  I probably didn’t see him winning his first 1000 like he did. But on the men’s side, it’s not like the women’s side. You have Serena who massively changes things if she’s in the draw. The men’s side is a lot thinner to the outside winning these things. Look at the percentage over the last 13, 14 years of outside guys to win a slam.

    Q. What did you see at the French regarding Djokovic? Do you think the addition of Andre has changed anything for him? Roger coming in after the big break, focusing on grass. Do you see him as the favorite or a favorite?
    BRAD GILBERT: I mean, Djokovic obviously had a disappointing French Open, losing the way he did in the quarters to Thiem. He had never lost to him. That was a disappointing ending to it.  I expect that he’ll play better on the grass. He took a wild card this week in Eastbourne. Unfortunately having some weather issues. I think Andre will help him a lot. I spoke to Andre. He will be there for the whole duration of the tournament. He had some commitments, he was not able to stay for the rest of the French, had to leave early. So he will be there.

    The biggest thing about tennis, when you win all the matches, you start to win a lot of them in the locker room, you start to get the lead. All of a sudden after six or seven years of invincibility, you have a little dropoff, all of a sudden guys to have a little different belief going out on the court.  Djokovic has got to get back to that place where he was before. The only way you can do that is winning matches. I think at 30, the hourglass has clicked away. I expect him to make a comeback.

    Then Federer, at 35, almost 36, if you had to tell me who the favorite is, you know, without seeing the draw, I would say him. The fact he’s in this position where he’s at, only lost twice this year, seems to know how to listen to himself with rest and peaking at the right times. I think it all looks good at the moment for Roger.

    CHRISSIE EVERT: The Djokovic situation is hard to really predict what’s going to happen. I mean, everyone speculates. We don’t know what’s going on in his life, with him emotionally, as far as mentally is he distracted with his focus, physically. Everybody’s speculating.  The truth of the matter is only he knows and only he knows where he is in his tennis and how much he wants it. I admire him. He’s trying so hard to get it back, to get his mojo back. You can sense he’s trying so hard. But it’s been a struggle for him because life has intervened with his robotic-like focus. That’s what he’s been known for, is just to have that tunnel vision. Life has intervened right now.  Only he knows. Only he knows where he’s at. I always believed once a champion, always a champion. I think he’ll get it back eventually.

    As far as Federer, the thing is that once you get to his age, he’s still in the game because, number one, he’s never really taken his losses that badly, he’s let them roll off his back. Number two, he hasn’t trained like, say, Rafa. He’s trained in a different way according to his style. I think right now all he needs is really to stay in great shape and to be fresh. He doesn’t need to play a ton of matches.

    What’s happened the last 15 years does affect you in the present today. That’s just like Serena. Serena and Rog are really in the same boat in that respect. They don’t need to play week in, week out. They just need to be fresh and to be fit.

    Q. Rafa looked about as good as he ever has winning the French. This will be his first Wimbledon in two years. What do you see for him? And Andy Murray, after the early loss at Queen’s, he had a great Roland Garros, but also had early losses in Madrid and Rome, what needs to go right for him to sort of get it back?
    BRAD GILBERT: For Rafa, I mean, the last few years, I saw him play last year, the biggest thing is getting through the first week. You’re right, I’ve never seen him look better personally than at the French and this entire clay court season. I think his serve is as good as it looked, the forehand back to being devastating.  I said it in December, I’ll say it again. I think the best thing that happened to him was bringing Carlos Moya onboard. I think that’s totally reinvigorated him, given him a different perspective. He looked a lot happier on the court.

    The way he plays, he won’t have any matches coming in on the grass. It’s all about getting through the first week. If he can get through that first week, then I think he can get a lot of confidence going into the second week.  I think his game plays a lot better when the conditions are warmer and the ball bounces higher for him. I think his game is more effective. I think the way he’s serving should bode well for his game. Like I said, it’s all about getting through that first week to put yourself in position for the second week.

    Murray, it’s definitely been a confusing year. Obviously, you know, didn’t realize obviously what the physical toll took on him last year, having to deal some this year with shingles. More than anything, like I said about Djokovic, what’s happened to Federer three, four years ago, he’s got it back now: you start to lose a little bit, guys start to come on the court with different belief.  I think game-wise, you know, he struggled a little bit on offense and defense. Does he want to play more defense, or most of? I do think that grass, without a doubt, is his best surface. He still moves brilliantly on this surface. He can defend and return as well as anybody.  He didn’t have any real run or results coming into the French, and he got to the semis. I still think on this surface, he could easily make a deep run because of how comfortable he is on this surface.  But guys are playing with renewed confidence now against him.

    CHRISSIE EVERT: I think with Rafa, the big difference is the confidence. He’s stepping in, moving in. When he wasn’t confident, he was six to ten feet behind the baseline on every surface, just counterpunching, just retrieving. He’s so confident now, I think that is reflected in the way he’s playing, coming into the baseline. He’s coming to the net a lot more, even on the clay. It was as natural as anything for him to hit a ball, come in, volley away a winner. We haven’t seen that in Rafa. That to me shows confidence, when a baseliner starts coming in, in a free way, looks so natural up there.  As Brad said also, the serve. But he’s moving in, he’s volleying. He’s a lot more confident. He’s going to be really psyched, I think, to play at Wimbledon. If it’s a good grass court, if it’s playing like a good grass court does, I think he’s going to feel very comfortable.

    Murray, you know, Andy had a setback at Queen’s. I think he would have liked to have had a few matches under his belt. And I agree with Brad. Don’t mean to be repetitious. But last year, 2016, took so much out of him. It was a rigorous and demanding year. He came up No. 1 in the world, played more tournaments than he had recently. I just think it’s still taking its toll a little bit on him.  If he’s going to resurrect his A game anywhere it’s going to be at Wimbledon in front of his crowd. But he’s got to be in an aggressive mode. He’s got to feel that that first strike of the ball is his.

    Q. The state of No. 1 right now in both the men’s and women’s game. As much as we talked about everybody being more aggressive and hitting the ball hard, you may have two very defensive players at the top. What do you think about that? And Coco Vandeweghe. I look at her as having everything it takes to win Wimbledon. She just fired her coach, everything is changing. What do you think the state of her career is because she’s not a kid anymore.
    CHRISSIE EVERT: First of all, she didn’t fire her coach. Don’t say that.
    Q. She parted ways with her coach.
    CHRISSIE EVERT: I think he left her, let’s put it that way. Just wanted to get the facts right.

    I think at the top of the game, it’s very chaotic right now. I think there’s a lot of fragility. I think the players that have been at the top have not lived up to their billing. That’s a constructive criticism. I feel terrible saying that, but everyone who’s reached No. 1, they haven’t carried on the momentum, and they haven’t stepped up and really embraced that position of leadership on and off the court.  So in saying that, you know, you really can’t count on any one player right now like you could count on Serena in the past. But I also, in defense of that, say there’s a lot of depth. That is obvious. More depth than I’ve ever seen. You can look at the top 20, 30 players, like Brad said, to win a major. That’s a lot of depth.  To me it’s a big transition time now in the women’s game. We have to think that’s kind of exciting in a sense. Not one player is dominating, but on the other hand it’s time for these players to come through. Who is going to be the next one that we’re going to get really excited about who is going to come along.

    About Coco, oh boy. Coco was very impressive last year. Wasn’t it last year she had a good Wimbledon? She’s shown she can play on the grass. I think with Craig Kardon, I loved his temperament for her. I loved that he had coached Martina and some other top players. He had that experience of knowing how to deal with an aggressive player, maybe a little high strung. He was a very calming, I think, influence on Coco. I think he will be missed. I think he was a great addition to her team.  It’s hard to tell where Coco is now. She’s like a yo-yo. She’s been so up and down. She will play a great match. You think, She can really win, win Wimbledon. Then she’ll play a match you think she could lose first round. I think she’s up and down. The fact that Craig, she’s changing the team now, Craig is no longer with her, you kind of wonder if that might have an effect on her tennis and on the stability of her game right now.  But certainly a very dangerous player, especially on the grass. You’d have to say she and even Madison Keys, no one has talked about Madison, because she unfortunately has been injured, but she and Madison to me are the two dark horses that could do some damage at this year’s Wimbledon.

    BRAD GILBERT: On the first question, you were asking about at the top of the game in the men’s and women’s?
    Q. Yes.
    CHRISSIE EVERT: Kerber and Murray when they were No. 1, is that what you meant, defensive?
    Q. Yes.
    BRAD GILBERT: First on the women’s side, I mean, right now look at the race, from Halep to Svitolina, Pliskova. Obviously there’s two slams left. There’s a lot that can happen. I have no clue on who is going to take the mantle to being No. 1. The one that surprised me the most was Muguruza. I thought after she won the French last year she would step up and be a solid top-three player. She’s completely fallen off the rails.  I never expected Kerber to have the year she had in the history of the world last year. All of a sudden she had an outrageous 2016, she’ll have at least half as good in 2017. Now she’s nowhere to be found.  The women’s game right now with Serena out, there’s opportunity for a lot of them. It’s how you manage that opportunity, how you manage yourself week in and week out with the opportunity.

    With Coco, her biggest problem by far, I’ll just use one word, consistency. She has no consistency in her game. She played great in Australia, gets to the semis. Coming into Australia, last year, she went from the grass to the end of the year winning one or two matches, then struggled after that. She struggles to put together week in and week out, like, two, three quarters in a row, two, three semis, consistent results.  Obviously for her and her team, it’s for them to figure out why she can’t get consistent results. She has a big serve, big game, moves well. You feel like it’s all there ready for her to make a run to the top 10, especially after Australia, but for some reason that first round is an Achilles for her a lot.  I feel like she should be ranked higher. I can’t give you the reason why she’s not more consistent week in and week out.

    In the men’s game, obviously at this point, unless something massively changes, it’s a two-horse race for 1, with Rafa having the biggest lead over Fed. Those two are incredible all-arounders, who are not defensive minded, they are amazingly offensive minded. The biggest misconception about Rafa in the history of the world…He has never been a defensive player. He is an offensive machine who is willing to play defense. But the basis of his game is relentless offense. Even if he’s eight feed behind the baseline, he is relentless on offense, but willing to play defense. Unbelievable all-arounder.  On the men’s side, it’s a two-horse race unless something dramatically changes at Wimbledon.

    CHRISSIE EVERT: I just want to throw in one thing about Coco. I think fitness is crucial for her. I think her fitness level determines where she wins or loses matches.  Brad, when you said you don’t know why she’s not more consistent. I think, listen, this is a woman who relies on power. She relies on hitting winners. She does not want to run down balls. If she’s one second slow, the margin for error is huge. She’s going to make more errors. She’s going to try to go for winners when she’s out of position.  I think the women nowadays are hitting with such placement and pinpoint accuracy, opening up the court so well with movement, that is one area that Coco has really worked on, by the way, in the last few years and has gotten so much fitter. But, again, she doesn’t want to run down balls. The beauty of a player like Halep who can run down balls is she’s a more consistent player, she plays the percentages, she can wait for the right shot to go for a winner.  Coco, very often, if she can’t get to a ball, she’s going to take more risks. That’s why she’s not as consistent as she could be. I tried to say that with some grace there. But you get it, though.

    Q. Chrissie, how good can CiCi Bellis be? Brad, considering he was in the final last year, he lost in the first round of Queen’s, I’m shocked at how little Milos is mentioned as a possible winner this year.
    CHRISSIE EVERT: I mentioned him. I mentioned him as a danger out of the top four.
    Q. I did notice that. But everybody else, it’s unbelievable.
    CHRISSIE EVERT: Yeah, I mean, let’s go to CiCi first. I don’t know what she was ranked this time last year, but she’s made a jump in the rankings. Very impressive wins she’s had in the last few months. Especially on the grass.  I think CiCi could be a solid top-20 player. I think she’s still developing her game, so it’s hard to tell. The limitations she has height-wise she makes up for, as best as she can, with her —
    BRAD GILBERT: I’m looking at her bio. She’s ranked 40. She’s listing herself at 5’7″. Do you think that’s an incredibly generous 5’7″?
    CHRISSIE EVERT: I’m 5’6″. When I stand up next to her, she might be 5’6″, 5’6″ and a half. But let’s not talk about the height and weight of the women, you know, because they’re not always accurate.

    I just want to finish saying that what she lacks maybe in height she does maybe make up for in her movement. She’s getting more power on the ball. Her serve was always her weakest point. I think they’re really working on getting some more speed on that serve.  I love her hunger. She’s hungry. You talk about the top players, you know, who is going to make the difference? We talk about the fitness, talk about power. But who is hungrier? Who really wants to be No. 1? That I think CiCi Bellis has that ability to want a match so badly. She has very, you know, very few highs and lows. She’s always concentrating, focused, doesn’t get down on herself, has a good competitive attitude. I see her as a solid top 20 I think in the next year.

    BRAD GILBERT: I’ll say CiCi, I’m rooting for her, she’s a Bay Area native. Let’s start with top-10 potential. I think one thing on the lady’s side that’s a rarity, she has a much better forehand. Usually it’s the backhand. She moves tremendously well, plays with a lot of guile. Serve by far is the weakest part of her game. I think she’s a great competitor.  She’d be in my 40 that’s got a shot to win the tournament, I’ll say that. But let’s start with top 10. When she gets there, we can reevaluate.

    On Milos, he had an amazing 2016, finished the year 3 in the world. The last match of 2016, maybe the best match I’ve ever seen Milos play and compete in, three and a half hours against Murray.  2017, if you want to say one word that comes to mind for Milos, an unfortunate word, is injury. He can’t stay healthy. He’s had numerous different injuries. He’s a big guy, 6’5″, 218 pounds. That’s the thing unfortunately that you’re thinking about more than can he make a deep run, is can he stay healthy.  But I think if he can stay healthy, he just parted ways with Krajicek, so he’s had a few different changes of coaches in the last year. But I think now, you got to see where he lands in the draw. Will come into this Wimbledon with a little different mindset than last year where he got to the finals of Queen’s, had a great run, had McEnroe on his team. This year comes in losing first round, how will his mindset be?  I need to see his draw. He would be in the second group of guys that could make a deep run. But I don’t have as much, you know, belief where he’s at this year to where he was last year. I still think that I can see him making the quarters, but I’ve got to see his draw first.

    Q. If you could step back and change one thing in our sport, what would that be? Why the heck do you think the big five players had that dominance that’s pretty incredible, and the others can’t break through?
    BRAD GILBERT: I could change about 50 things, but let’s start with getting a shot clock on the court so that everybody knows exactly how long it takes in between points. Boom, we can see it. On red clay, we don’t have Shot Spot there. I can’t stand seeing umpires check marks. A lot of times they check the marks wrong. I want to see Shot Spot on clay.

    If I’m commissioner for the day, you cannot catch your ball toss. You throw your ball toss up, I’ll give you one Mulligan to get in the match, that’s it. You cannot catch your toss 30 times in the match because of something you did to yourself. I see that far too often. One thing that drives me crazy.

    The great thing about men’s tennis, women’s tennis, and sports in general now, is that it used to be you turned 30, you were on the other side of your career, you were on the downside. Now, I’m really starting to believe age is just a number. Look at Ronaldo at 32. The best soccer player in the world. Tom Brady playing football at a level where he’s going to be 40 soon, he’s the best quarterback ever. Look at his age. Roger is almost 36. Guys are starting to believe, and athletes, that you can do things longer, you can continue to improve.  I think actually mentally maybe they’re more relaxed. Maybe they’re more easygoing about how this whole journey and process goes. I think it’s a lot tougher now for younger players. When you used to see so many younger players break in at 17, 18, do amazing things, I think it’s harder now to do these things physically at a younger age. I think that’s lent itself to the success of older players doing well.  I think it all starts back, to me, to 2005, Andre getting to the finals of US Open at 35. I think it immediately changed how guys view things. Wow, Andre could make the finals at 35 after being on the tour for 20 years? I really think that probably changed Roger a lot, too, because he played him. I do think that’s changed.

    The season doesn’t stop. As soon as the season stops, you’re training, from diet to full teams, everybody is doing what they can to push the envelope. It’s amazing to see.

    CHRISSIE EVERT: If I may add one thing to what Brad said about now players are playing longer and longer, well into their 30s. I love that because I think it takes the emphasis and the pressure off of junior tennis. There’s not a rush. Okay, you don’t have to win the 14 Nationals or 16 Nationals. These agents are coming to junior tournaments. There’s so much pressure, like Brad said, to be looked at as a potential pro when you’re 15, 16. Are you going to make it? Who cares? Just develop your game, make it more fun.  I think right now everyone is looking towards, again, middle 20s to middle 30s as the peaking time. I think that will take the pressure off being a great junior player, just training too hard, having too much pressure.

    What about the bathroom breaks, Brad? In my 18 years of playing, I don’t ever remember leaving the court to go to the bathroom.
    BRAD GILBERT: I never left once ever. They basically didn’t allow you to do it.
    CHRISSIE EVERT: I never left once. A woman could leave for a specific reason, but I never left once. When I see a Venus or a Konta leave for 10 minutes, I’m like, What are they doing? How unfair is that for the player that’s waiting?  We talked about it for two years, the WTA and the ATP. Everyone says, We’re going to make that change. Nothing’s changed. That’s my two cents worth.

    Q. Chrissie, you talked about Petra, after she was stabbed, comes back, has this appreciation, gratitude for the game. If you could step back and look at the big picture, having such a great lifetime in this sport, try and capture your appreciation or what you loved the most, are most grateful for in this sport.
    CHRISSIE EVERT: What I was more grateful for, my appreciation? You know, I think I appreciate the fact that I came up in the ’70s when it was all starting. The whole attitude of equality and of women versus the men, the unfairness that we were experiencing.  I feel so lucky that I came right after Billie Jean King. I saw her with my own eyes, what she did, and how she promoted the game, how she fought for women’s rights.  For me, the camaraderie of the ’70s with Billie Jean and Rosie and Virginia Wade and Martina. Still to this day, they are my greatest friends. I think it’s the camaraderie. I think it’s the people I met.

    Life just opened up in the ’70s for women tennis players. We got to travel the world. We got to play tennis for money. We earned a great living. We got to compete and be respected. I mean, women athletes at that time were just starting to be respected and looked up to. I appreciate it.

    I appreciate the opportunities my father gave me, because he started me. At six years old I never would have looked at a tennis court and said, That’s what I want to do. I probably would have been a school teacher. Not that that’s bad. I probably would have decided on another job. So I appreciate him guiding or pushing me into a sport that I eventually fell in love with.

    Q. I’d like your opinion on John McEnroe’s verdict on Serena? Would she be hypothetically ranked 700? McEnroe this morning suggested that men and women play together. What is your opinion on that, as well?
    CHRISSIE EVERT: My answer is short, so I’m going to go first.  I feel like it’s irrelevant. I feel like we’ve been through this story before with Martina Navratilova and Steffi Graf. They were questioned, too, where would they be in the men’s ranking. I feel like it’s irrelevant. It doesn’t mean anything.  I also feel if, and I hate to say it, but if Serena Williams played the No. 200 male player, she might beat him. If she played the No. 500 man, she might lose to him. It depends on their styles, how the games match up. So that’s my answer.  My first answer is, who cares, it’s irrelevant, we’ve been through it before.

    BRAD GILBERT: Good word choice, Chrissie. First of all, I don’t know what the context of why he said it, why he double downed on it.  I will tell you (Serena) is the greatest female athlete in any sport ever, and maybe Steffi Graf is the second best athlete. Let’s say a 130-pound boxer might be the best ever. You don’t ask if he could beat, like, a heavyweight. He might be a better boxer than the heavyweight, but obviously he wouldn’t beat him. It’s totally ridiculous to ask or think about it. They don’t compete against each other.  I thought Serena had a 6-1, 6-1 beat down on her tweet to John. I thought it was tremendous. I thought that said everything, and nothing else needs to be said after what she said on Twitter. It was perfect.

    CHRISSIE EVERT: I have to put Martina Navratilova in this group, too. She could have been an Olympic skier. She could have been an Olympic ice hockey player. She could have been an Olympic basketball player. She’s tremendous in every sport. Along with Steffi, I would have to put her. You have to put her in that group, too.

    Q. Regarding Jo Konta, would you name her amongst the possible winners? Also, it’s 40 years since we’ve had a female winner at Wimbledon, Virginia Wade, your particular memories of that.
    CHRISSIE EVERT: Yes, I would count her in as a potential winner, absolutely. I didn’t even talk about Muguruza. Muguruza would have to be dangerous, as well as Jo Konta. I all depends on Jo Konta’s nerves, how she’s going to play. I think she’s a good grass court player. Her weapons are her serve and her forehand. She’s very good at moving forward, coming into the net. She has a good volley. There is no reason why she can’t be a top contender. It’s going to come down to her nerves, if she believes it, how she handles the pressure of playing in front of Brits.

    Q. Touch on 1977, as well.
    CHRISSIE EVERT: Well, I certainly don’t have fond memories of my match with Virginia, to tell you the truth (laughter). That wasn’t one of my finer moments. I kind of let the crowd get to me.  At the same time over the years I was really happy that she ended up winning that year. I think it changed her life. It just put a stamp on her career. She was a Wimbledon champion. I think that carries on throughout your whole life. It’s such a wonderful privilege.  Any time a Brit wins, I mean, I was happy that she won Wimbledon after she beat me in the semis, let’s put it that way. I said, She better win after she beat me. Also thrilled when Andy Murray won. There’s just something so special about a player winning their own country’s championships. I think if anybody can do it, the way they’ve been playing on the women’s side, it’s Jo Konta, for sure.  Boy, she’s just going to have to show us some guts, but she can do it, yes.

    BRAD GILBERT: I’ll put Jo Konta in my 40 that can win it. I think it all starts, she never made it past the first week at Wimbledon. I would think clay is her weakest surface, and by far her best surface is hard courts. She’s never done well at Wimbledon.  For her, it’s two tournaments. The first tournament is to get through the first week, manage yourself and get through the first week, put yourself in position to where things can happen.  Without seeing the draw, I expect, just like at the French, a lot of the slams now for the women, I expect half the seeds to be blown up before the first week. It’s the way these tournaments have gone. Since Indian Wells, every single tournament, there’s been a different winner every week.
    CHRISSIE EVERT: It’s unbelievable.
    BRAD GILBERT: Every single week since Indian Wells there’s been a different winner. I just think for Jo Konta, and obviously a lot of expectations and pressure, the one thing that you can control more than anything is what happens on the tennis court. Get through that first week and put yourself in position.
    CHRISSIE EVERT: Yeah.
    BRAD GILBERT: If you see the way she plays, moves well, got a good serve, hits the ball big. She kind of plays like Azarenka a bit. I think her game should translate well to grass. But you have to make the result. They don’t give you the result.

    My memory of ’77, I think I was 16 years old. I remember her winning it. I remember the whole Our Ginny thing. I was only 16. I think it was probably more in the headlines here in California, Can you believe that Chrissie lost?
    CHRISSIE EVERT: I couldn’t believe it!

Listen, I got to say one thing about Jo. The good news is she’s been in big-match situations and come through. She’s beaten some big names. She’s done well. She deserves to be listed. Is she 7 or 8? What is her ranking?

Q. It’s 8, I think.
CHRISSIE EVERT: So she’s in the circle of champions, okay? I would love to see her be so inspired out there on the grass in front of her people, playing her game the way she knows how to play.  She knows how to play aggressive tennis. She knows how to do that. She knows how to play bold. She’s good with the first strike of the ball. She knows how to volley. Everything’s there. All the parts are there. It’s going to be up to her. It’s going to be in her head. How is she going to view this experience, negatively or positively?

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Tennis Channel’s Wimbledon Primetime Coverage Begins July 3

TENNIS CHANNEL’S WIMBLEDON PRIMETIME COVERAGE BEGINS JULY 3

 

Network will Dedicate More than 200 Hours to Tennis’ Oldest Major

 

Hall of Famers Martina Navratilova, Jim Courier and Lindsay Davenport

Join Veteran Broadcasters Mary Carillo, Bill Macatee and Others in London

 

LOS ANGELES, June 27, 2017 -Tennis Channel will broadcast from the All England Lawn Tennis Club for its 10th year of Wimbledon Primetime beginning on the tournament’s first day, Monday, July 3. The network plans to dedicate more than 200 hours to Wimbledon coverage over the two-week event. Wimbledon Primetime will air each night of the competition followed by encore presentations that run throughout the late night. Tennis Channel will offer 100 hours of first-run Wimbledon Primetime, beginning at 4:30 p.m. ET on July 3.

 

Wimbledon Primetime looks at each day’s play, delivering important news, expert analysis and encore matches from the famed grounds in London. The nightly show gives viewers a chance to catch-up on the action that took place at the tournament while many Americans are at work. As with years past, Wimbledon Primetime will feature Tennis Channel’s deep roster of commentators and broadcasters. Hall of Famers Martina Navratilova (@Martina) and Jim Courier will serve as lead analysts. Fellow Hall of Famer Lindsay Davenport (@LDavenport76) will also be in the booth. The two women share a combined 22 Wimbledon titles across singles, doubles and mixed doubles. Joining the network’s Hall of Famers will be coach and former Wimbledon mixed-doubles semifinalist Justin Gimelstob (@justingimelstob), and legendary coach Paul Annacone (@paul_annacone). Annacone, who is known for coaching two of Wimbledon’s greatest champions in Pete Sampras and Roger Federer, will coach three-time Grand Slam champion Stan Wawrinka during the tournament this year.

 

Host and reporter Mary Carillo will provide special features and analysis, and join panel discussions throughout the tournament. Sharing hosting duties with Carillo is Bill Macatee (@BMacatee), who is back for his 10th year at Wimbledon with Tennis Channel. New to the announcing team this year are veteran broadcaster Brett Haber (@BrettHaber) and Steve Weissman (@Steve_Weissman). They will be joined by Sports Illustrated executive editor and senior writer Jon Wertheim (@jon_wertheim), a year-round reporter for Tennis Channel. He will offer analysis and produce in-depth essays in his unique storytelling style throughout the tournament. In a repeat of his time with Tennis Channel at Roland Garros, Boris Kodjoe (@BorisKodjoe) will head to Wimbledon as a juniors analyst. Likewise, actor Omar Miller (@OmarMiller) will also provide “Advantage Omar” segments for the network, as he did during the French Open, while he explores London.

 

There are usually two editions of Wimbledon Primetime each night, with the episodes highlighting different matches. The network will broadcast encore presentations of both throughout the late evening. During the first week of the tournament, Wimbledon Primetime will generally run from 4:30 p.m.-8:30 p.m. ET and 8:30 p.m.-12:30 a.m. ET. For the second week, Wimbledon Primetime will have the two-episode format every day except Thursday, July 13, and will typically air during the late afternoon Eastern Time. The women’s and men’s championships will air Saturday, July 15, and Sunday, July 16, at 6 p.m. ET respectively. For a complete schedule of all Wimbledon coverage please visit: http://tennischannel.com/schedule.

 

Live on Friday, June 30, at 7 p.m. ET, the network will offer its annual look at the tournament draw with Racquet Bracket: Wimbledon. Steve Weissman, Leif Shiras (@lshirock), Jimmy Arias (@ariastennis) and Chanda Rubin (@Chanda_Rubin) will break down the bracket and look ahead to tough matchups and surprises that may be on the way. On Sunday, July 2, at 8 p.m. ET viewers can find the same team during Tennis Channel’s Wimbledon Preview. This program focuses less on the draw itself and looks forward to the various storylines and players ahead of the tournament. On Sunday, July 2, at 9:30 p.m. ET, Tennis Channel will premiere Holding Serve with Judy Murray. Murray, the mother of World No. 1 Andy Murray and the first British Wimbledon champion since Fred Perry in 1935, discusses her life coaching her sons and how the sport has grown in Scotland with Carillo. Additionally, Tennis Channel will air classic Wimbledon matches the week prior to the tournament, including the 2008 final between Rafael Nadal and Roger Federer, which many consider to be the greatest match of all-time.

 

All Wimbledon Primetime segments and interviews will be available digitally for online viewers. Along with its Wimbledon Primetime segments, all of the network’s short-form productions will be accessible digitally as well on as TennisChannel.com and Tennis magazine’s Tennis.com, the latter a recent addition to the family of network parent Sinclair Broadcast Group. These short-form pieces include “Destination Tennis,” “TenniStory,” “Advantage Omar” and “Mary in London,” as well as Tennis Channel’s multiplatform series My Tennis Life, which follows professional players Nicole Gibbs and Sam Groth.

 

Tennis Channel and Tennis magazine’s websites will also share content from each outlets’ reporters during the tournament.

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ESPN Broadcast Schedule for The 2017 Championships, Wimbledon

From ESPN:

ESPN’s Exclusive First-to-Last Ball Coverage of The 2017 Championships, Wimbledon

·         Coverage all Day, every Day:  140 Hours on TV – ESPN, ESPN2 and ABC
·         Qualifying This Week on ESPN3, Streaming Live on the ESPN App
·         Will Federer, Nadal Continue Resurgence?
·         Wide Open Ladies’ Field – Azarenka Returns, Kvitova’s Comeback Continues, Venus Still a Threat
·         1,500 Live Hours from all 15 TV Courts on ESPN3, Streaming Live on the ESPN App; 3-Box Screen Returns for Semis, Championships
·         “Cross Court Coverage” Returns for Monday-Wednesday the Second Week
·         Ladies’ and Gentlemen’s Doubles Championships Live on ESPN on July 15, Mixed Doubles on July 16

 

ESPN’s exclusive coverage of The Championships, Wimbledon – from first ball to last ball – begins Monday, July 3, with 140 hours on TV and 1,500 on ESPN3 and streaming live on the ESPN App with action from all 15 televised courts.  The action will climax with the Ladies’ Championship and the Ladies’ and Gentlemen’s Doubles Championships on ESPN on Saturday, July 15, and the Gentlemen’s Championship on Sunday, July 16, followed by the Mixed Doubles Championship.

 

Through Thursday, June 29, all four days of qualifying are on ESPN3 and streamed live on the ESPN App, with all-day action starting at 6 a.m. ET from one of the grass courts at the Bank of England Sports Centre in Roehampton, not far from Wimbledon and the All England Lawn Tennis Club.  Qualifying for Wimbledon has never before been produced for distribution.

 

Highlights

  • The first five weekdays, ESPN begins at 7 a.m. ET for daylong coverage (scheduled to end at 4:30 p.m. except 4 p.m. on Tuesday).  The action gets started at 6:30 a.m. on ESPN3 and streaming live on the ESPN App with all televised courts (up to 15 at a time).
  • On Saturday, July 8, ESPN again begins at 7 a.m., but with the one-hour Breakfast at Wimbledon before another day full of action (scheduled to end at 5 p.m.).
  • On the “middle Sunday,” July 9 – Wimbledon’s traditional annual day of rest – ABC will broadcast a three-hour review of the first week at 3 p.m.  In addition, ABC will present encore presentations of the finals on the day they take place, July 15 and 16, at 3 p.m.
  • “Cross Court Coverage” returns the first three days of the second week, with ESPN starting at 8 a.m. and focused on Centre Court all day while fans will enjoy a “grounds pass” with matches from No.1 Court and elsewhere on ESPN2 beginning at 7 a.m. on Monday, July 10, and at 8 a.m. on July 11 and 12.
  • From Thursday, July 13, through the Championships, all the action is on ESPN, beginning each day with Breakfast at Wimbledon (7 a.m. on July 13-14 leading into the semifinals, 8 a.m. on July 15-16, previewing the Championships).
  • ESPN Deportes will air the semifinals and Championships (July 13-16).
  • Saturday, July 15, will feature the Ladies’ Singles Championship along with the Ladies’ and Gentlemens’ Doubles Championship on ESPN with the Gentlemen’s Championship and Mixed Doubles Championship on Sunday.  All other division championships will be available on ESPN3 and the ESPN App.
  • The ESPN and ESPN2 telecasts, and a total of 1,500 hours from all 15 televised courts (Centre, Courts 1-3, 5-9, 11, 12, 14, and 16-18.) plus AELTC’s daily The Wimbledon Channel will be presented from first ball to last ball each day on ESPN3 and streaming live on the ESPN App.  The action will also be available on demand afterwards.  As in the past, for the semifinals and championships an additional feed – “Wimbledon Surround” – will be added with three boxes – the primary TV view, plus two more, each focusing on one player.  Select matches each day will be available in Spanish via ESPNDeportes+.

 

The three-box offering on WatchESPN for the semis and championships, Wimbledon Surround, includes angles focused on each player, in addition to the match.

 

  • WatchESPN is accessible on computers, smartphones, tablets, connected devices and smart TVs and available nationwide across all major providers through an affiliated video subscription.

 

The ESPN Tennis Team, the best in television, at Wimbledon:

  • Darren Cahill, who once reached the US Open semifinals and the Australian Open doubles finals and went on to coach fellow Australian Lleyton Hewitt and Andre Agassi, has worked for ESPN since 2007.  Currently the coach of Simona Halep, the recent French Open finalist, he will serve as an analyst for men’s matches.
  • Cliff Drysdale, who was inducted into the Tennis Hall of Fame in July 2013, reached the US Open finals and is a two-time Wimbledon and French Open semifinalist.  He has been with ESPN since its first tennis telecast in 1979.  Drysdale was a leader on the court – a top player for many years who was one of the first to use a two-hand backhand – and off the court, as the first president of the ATP.
  • Chrissie Evert, a Hall of Famer who joined ESPN in 2011, her 18 Major titles include three at Wimbledon.  She recorded the best career win-loss record in history, reached more Major singles finals than any man or woman (34), and reached the semis or better in 34 consecutive Majors (1971-83).  The AP Female Athlete of the Year four times, in 1976 she was the first woman to be the sole recipient of Sports Illustrated’s Sportswoman of the Year.
  • Mary Joe Fernandez, an ESPN analyst since 2000, played in three Major singles finals and won two Majors in doubles, won a Gold Medal in doubles at the 1992 and 1996 Olympics and a Bronze in singles in 1992.  She was the coach of the United States’ Fed Cup team for eight years, stepping down in 2016, and coached the 2012 and ’16 U.S. women’s Olympic team.
  • Mardy Fish, a former longtime pro who once was No. 7 in the world, joins ESPN’s roster as an analyst.  The Minnesota native won six events on tour, an Olympic Silver Medal in 2004 and reached the quarterfinals of three Majors – Australia, French and Wimbledon.  He was the top-ranked American man in 2011 when he reached a career high of No. 7.  He retired after the 2015 US Open.
  • Chris Fowler – who joined ESPN in 1986, is the lead ESPN/ABC college football play caller and joined the ESPN tennis team in 2003 – will call matches.  He hosted College GameDay on football Saturdays 1990-2014, and has hosted World Cup soccer, college basketball including the Final Four, the X Games and Triple Crown horse racing events.  Originally, he was the first host of Scholastic Sports America and later was a SportsCenter
  • Brad Gilbert, whose flair and unique nicknames for players has enlivened ESPN’s tennis telecasts since 2004, parlayed his playing career – once reaching the quarterfinals of the US Open and at Wimbledon – into coaching Andre Agassi (six Major titles with Brad), Andy Roddick (US Open victory) and Andy Murray.
  • Jason Goodall will serve as a studio and match analyst.  A one-time standout among Juniors in Britain whose career was ended by injury at 21, he later coached Jennifer Capriati as well as ESPN’s Mary Joe Fernandez and Pam Shriver.
  • John McEnroe won seven Major singles titles, including three at Wimbledon, during his storied career, which included 10 more Major crowns in doubles or mixed doubles.  He also led the U.S. to four Davis Cup titles and won the NCAA’s while attending Stanford.  He has worked the US Open for ESPN since 2009.
  • Patrick McEnroe, who has worked for ESPN since 1995, was a three-time singles All-American at Stanford – where the team won NCAA titles in 1986 and 1988 – and served as General Manager, USTA Elite Player Development from 2008 – 2015.  He won the 1992 French Open doubles title and reached the 1991 Australian Open semifinals in singles.  He served as the U.S. Davis Cup captain 2001-2010; in 2007 the team won its first championship since 1995.
  • Chris McKendry returns as host, a role she has filled at all the Majors for ESPN. She joined ESPN in 1996 as a SportsCenter anchor, and later hosted the Little League World Series and X Games.  As of Spring 2016, she focuses on tennis.  She attended Drexel University on a tennis scholarship.
  • Patrick Mouratoglou, Serena Williams’ coach since 2012, helped her to unprecedented success deep into her mid-30s – 10 Major titles, an Olympic Gold Medal and a stranglehold on the WTA No. 1 ranking.  A longtime coach, including great results over seven years with Marcos Baghdatis, he will serve as an analyst.
  • Tom Rinaldi will serve as a reporter and will call matches.  His features and interviews have graced a wide variety of ESPN programs – including SportsCenter, Outside the Lines, E:60 and event telecasts such as Wimbledon, golf’s Majors, college football and more – since 2003, winning numerous Sports Emmy Awards.
  • Pam Shriver, who started working for ESPN in 1990, long before her Hall of Fame career ended, played in the US Open finals at age 16 (losing to Evert) and three times in the Wimbledon semifinals.  She won 21 Grand Slam titles in women’s doubles (another in Mixed) including five at Wimbledon plus a Gold Medal in doubles at the 1988 Olympics.
  • Rennae Stubbs, who enjoyed a long career in doubles – winning six Majors: four in women’s and two in mixed, representing Australia at four Olympic Games and for 17 years in Fed Cup, will be an analyst.  She’s worked summer events for ESPN for many years, and for NBC at the Olympics and for Tennis Channel.

 

Surveying the (very, very different) Fields

  • Is it 2017 in men’s tennis, or 2006?  Roger Federer, 35, and 31-year old Rafael Nadal have split the first two Majors of the year and each has a pair of ATP Masters 1000 crowns.  Whatever they’re having, I’ll have two.
  • Of the last 49 Majors (more than 12 years), five men own every trophy but two (and they are currently ranked No. 1-5, and each is in their 30s):  Roger Federer (18 career Major wins), Rafael Nadal (15), Novak Djokovic (12) and defending champion Andy Murray and Stan Wawrinka (3 each).  The traditional “Big Four” (all but Wawrinka) comprise 46 of the last 54 Major finalists and 78 of the last 90 (with Stan: 50 of 54, 82 of 90).  All but Wawrinka have won Wimbledon at least twice.
  • On the women’s side, the “short list” of top contenders is rather long, just like at the French Open where fans learned to expect the unexpected – a first-ever title of any type for unseeded 20-year-old Jelena Ostapenko.  This year’s top performers seeking a first Major victory include Simona Halep, Karolina Pliskova, Elina Svitolina, Caroline Wozniacki, Kristina Mladenovic and Elena Vesnina, a semifinalist last year.
  • In addition to Ostapenko, women who have tasted Major victory:  Garbiñe Muguruza (2016 French Open, also a finalist at the 2015 Wimbledon), 2016 sensation Angelque Kerber (won Australian Open and US Open and reached the Wimbledon final).  Then there’s the over-30 gang:  Svetlana Kuznetsova (31, won 2004 US Open, 2009 French Open), Francesca Schiavone (36, 2010 French Open) and, of course, Venus Williams, who turned 37 the other day, has five Venus Rosewater Dishes on her shelf, and reached the semis last year.  In January, she met her sister in the Australian Open final.
  • Two other players holding four Major championships, including two in London, will be in the draw, but Petra Kvitova and Victoria Azarenka are in the early stages of major comebacks.  Kvitova (both Major victories at Wimbledon) is recovering from being stabbed on her left (playing) hand during a December robbery.  She won one match in her return to play, at the French Open.  On Sunday, she amazingly won the title at Birmingham, but has withdrawn from Eastborne this week, citing an abdominal injury.  Azarenka (two Australian Open crowns, plus twice a Wimbledon semifinalist) made her first appearance after maternity leave at last week’s Mallorca Open, winning a match before falling in the second round.
  • Two women who own 28 Major titles – including eight at Wimbledon – are on the sidelines the coming fortnight:  Serena Williams (expecting a child, 23 and seven) and Maria Sharapova (injured, five and one).
  • Top Doubles Storylines:  American Bethanie Mattek-Sands and Czech Lucie Safarova have captured three straight Major titles and will be attempting to make history in London.  The duo also has took the Australian and French Open titles in 2015.  Men’s trophies at Grand Slam events have been won by a variety of teams since the Bryan Brothers (Bob/Mike) won their 16th Major at the 2014 US Open but the 39-year-old twins from California are still a top contender.

 

MORE TV & DIGITAL MEDIA, AT HOME AND ABROAD

ESPN.com will have previews, reviews, the latest news and videos and more:

  • Courtcast: A multi-tool application with live events via the WatchESPN syndicated player, all-court scoring, match stats, poll questions, rolling Twitter feeds and scrolling bottom line
  • Digital Serve: Daily original videos previewing the next day
  • Social buzz: What’s happening around the grounds our fans need to know about.
  • Global scene: A daily look at the storylines that are resonating in all of our regions.
  • com will be on site, providing features and profiles.

                                                          

ESPNDeportes.com will provide live scores and draws, in depth news and coverage of Latin American players, columns, blogs, live chats, video, highlights and news, including ESPiando Wimbledon that will recap the day’s play. The site will also feature Slam Central, a special index page dedicated to all four Grand Slams.

 

For a 10th year, ESPN will provide multi-screen coverage with commentary of five matches in addition to ESPN or ESPN2 network program through the second Monday of the Championships, on ESPN3, the ESPN App and DirecTV.  Fans will also receive interviews, features, press conferences and studio analysis from the All England Club.  Trey Wingo will return as host, joined in the studio by Rennae Stubbs, Mardy Fish and Chris Bowers.  Commentators for outer court matches will be provided by the BBC.  In addition to the video offerings, DirecTV viewers can access results, schedules, draws and other interactive features through the “Red Button” application on their remote. In total, ESPN will provide more than 350 hours of coverage through this unique application.

 

ESPN Classic is presenting a seven-day, non-stop marathon of memorable Wimbledon matches for exactly one week, ending after 168 hours (Monday, July 3 at 6 a.m. – one hour before ESPN’s live coverage begins) with 40 different matches including 33 finals..  The marathon will conclude with the 2016 Ladies’ and Gentlemen’s Championships.  Details.

 

ESPN International, the home of tennis’ Grand Slam events in Latin America and the Caribbean, will provide live Wimbledon coverage to more than 44 countries and 60 million homes via its television and digital platforms throughout the region.  ESPN’s Spanish language pan-regional networks will offer more than 100 hours of live tennis, focused on the top-ranked players in the world, while the regional networks will focus on players of local interest. In addition to the live coverage, ESPN will offer two daily encore presentations featuring the best matches of the day. ESPN’s Spanish-language commentator team will include tennis experts Luis Alfredo Alvarez and Eduardo Varela calling matches with analysts Javier Frana and Jose Luis Clerc, along with reporter Nicolas Pereira. In Brazil, ESPN will offer more than 150 hours of combined coverage between its ESPN and ESPN+ networks and will be available via simulcast on WatchESPN – ESPN’s Portuguese broadband service.  ESPN’s Caribbean networks will provide simulcast coverage and will broadcast over 110-hours of live Wimbledon content.

 

ESPN Play – ESPN International’s Spanish- and English-language broadband service in Latin America and the Caribbean – will offer 1,400-hours of live coverage from up to 15 courts simultaneously, covering every point from every camera court; ESPN Play will also offer qualifying matches for the first time, June 26-29, as well as the Wimbledon Surround three-screen service for the Gentlemen’s and Ladies’ Semifinals and Championships.

 

ESPN and Tennis

Tennis has been part of ESPN since its first week on the air, providing numerous memorable moments from around the world, but it has never been as important as today, with the unprecedented position of presenting three of the sports Major events from start to finish (Australian Open, Wimbledon, US Open, with exclusivity at the latter two).

 

ESPN & WIMBLEDON 2017

Date Time (ET) Event Network(s)  
Mon, July 3 –

Sun, July 16

(no play Sun, 7/9)

6:30 a.m. All TV Courts (up to 15), all day;

The Wimbledon Channel (from AELTC)

ESPN3 Live
   
Mon, July 3 –

Fri, July 7

7 a.m. – 4:30 p.m.

(to 4 p.m. July 4)

Early Round Action ESPN Live
Sat, July 8 7 – 8 a.m. Breakfast at Wimbledon ESPN Live
  8 a.m. – 5 p.m. Early Round Action ESPN Live
Sun, July 9 3 – 6 p.m. Highlights of Week One ABC Tape
Mon, July 10 7 a.m. – 5 p.m. Round of 16, No.1 Court & others ESPN2 Live
  8 a.m. – 3 p.m. Round of 16, Centre Court ESPN Live
Tue, July 11 8 a.m. – 4 p.m. Ladies’ Quarterfinals,

 Centre Court

ESPN Live
  8 – 2 p.m. Ladies’ Quarterfinals, No.1 Court ESPN2 Live
Wed, July 12 8 a.m. – 4 p.m. Gentlemen’s Quarterfinals, Centre Court ESPN Live
  8 a.m. – 3 p.m. Gentlemen’s Quarterfinals,

No.1 Court

ESPN2 Live
Thur, July 13 7 – 8 a.m. Breakfast at Wimbledon ESPN Live
  8 a.m. – 1 p.m. Ladies’ Semifinals ESPN

ESPN Deportes

Live
Fri, July 14 7 – 8 a.m. Breakfast at Wimbledon ESPN Live
  8 a.m. – 2 p.m. Gentlemen’s Semifinals ESPN

ESPN Deportes

Live
Sat, July 15 8 a.m. – 9 a.m. Breakfast at Wimbledon ESPN Live
  9 a.m. – 3 p.m. Ladies’ Championship

Gentlemen’s Doubles Championship

Ladies’ Doubles Championship

ESPN

ESPN Deportes

Live
  3 – 6 p.m. Ladies’ Championship ABC Tape
Sun, July 16 8 a.m. – 9 a.m. Breakfast at Wimbledon ESPN Live
  9 a.m. – 2:30 p.m. Gentlemen’s Championship

Mixed Doubles Championship

ESPN

ESPN Deportes

Live
  3 – 6 p.m. Gentlemen’s Championship ABC Tape

 

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Week-long Wimbledon Marathon on ESPN Classic

Week-long Wimbledon Marathon on ESPN Classic

First-Ever Distribution of Wimbledon Qualifying also underway on ESPN3

 

Leading up to The 2017 Championships, Wimbledon on Monday, July 3 at 7 a.m. ET on ESPN, ESPN Classic will air a week-long marathon of historic Wimbledon matches beginning today, Monday, June 26, at 6 a.m., ending  at 6 a.m., one hour before ESPN’s live coverage from the All England Lawn Tennis Club in London.

 

About the ESPN Classic Marathon

  • The marathon runs for exactly one week, 168 hours from 40 classic Wimbledon matches (33 of which are finals), plus re-airs
  • The marathon ends July 3 with last year’s Championships (Ladies’ – Serena Williams vs. Angelique Kerber – 1:30-3:30 a.m., Gentlemen’s – Andy Murray vs. Milos Raonic – 3:30-6 a.m.).
  • The oldest Gentlemen’s match is the 1977 Gentlemen’s Championships, Bjorn Borg vs. Jimmy Connors, June 26 from 3:30-5:30 p.m. and July 1 from 10:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m.; the oldest Ladies’ match is the 1982 Ladies’ Championships, Martina Navratilova vs. Andrea Jaeger, June 30 from 10-11:30 p.m.

 

Matches to Watch

  • Two airings of Roger Federer vs. Pete Sampras in the 2001 Gentlemen’s Round of 16 in five sets (7-6, 5-7, 6-4, 6-7, 7-5), the only time the two legends ever played. June 27 from 9:30-11:30 a.m. and July 3 from 2:30-4:30 a.m.
  • Two airings of Venus Williams vs. Lindsay Davenport in the 2005 Ladies’ Championship (4-6, 7-6, 9-7) that lasted two hours and 45 minutes, making it the longest women’s singles final in Wimbledon history. June 28 from 2-4 a.m. and July 2 from 5-7 p.m.
  • Two airings of Goran Ivanisevic vs. Pat Rafter in the 2001 Gentlemen’s Championship in five sets (6-3, 3-6, 6-3, 2-6, 9-7) where Ivanisevic had entered the draw via a wild card and went on to win. June 27 from 1:30-3:30 p.m. and July 2 from 6:30-8:30 a.m.
  • Two airings of Roger Federer vs. Andy Roddick in the legendary, five-set 2009 Gentlemen’s Championship (5-7, 7-6, 7-6, 3-6, 16-14) Federer’s 15th Grand Slam title that surpassed Pete Sampras for the most Major wins of all time. June 28 from 5-10 p.m. and June 29 from 10 p.m.-3 a.m.
  • Two airings of Venus Williams vs. Serena Williams in the 2002 Ladies’ Championship (6-7, 3-6), Serena’s first Wimbledon victory which earned her the world No. 1 ranking for the first time, dethroning Venus. June 27 from 3:30-5:30 p.m. and July 2 from 8:30-10:30 a.m.

 

Wimbledon Qualifying

Beginning today, ESPN is covering all four days of Ladies’ and Gentlemen’s qualifying for The Championships, Wimbledon for the first time, with all-day action from one of the grass courts at the Bank of England Sports Centre in Roehampton, not far from Wimbledon and the All England Lawn Tennis Club. Qualifying will take place through  Thursday, June 29, beginning each day at 6 a.m. with four matches scheduled per day on ESPN3 on WatchESPN and the ESPN App.

 

The Championships, Wimbledon

ESPN’s exclusive coverage of The Championships, Wimbledon – from first ball to last ball – begins Monday, July 3, with 140 hours on TV and 1,500 on ESPN3 and streaming live on the ESPN App with action from all 15 televised courts.  The action will climax with the Ladies’ Championship and the Ladies’ and Gentlemen’s Doubles Championships on ESPN on Saturday, July 15, and the Gentlemen’s Championship on Sunday, July 16, followed by the Mixed Doubles Championship.

 

Date Time (ET) Program/Players Network
Mon, Jun 26 6 – 8 a.m. 1984 Wimbledon Ladies’ Final

Chris Evert Lloyd vs. Martina Navratilova

ESPN Classic
  8 – 10 a.m. 1985 Wimbledon Ladies’ Final

Martina Navratilova vs. Chris Evert Lloyd

ESPN Classic
  10 – 11:30 a.m. 1987 Wimbledon Ladies’ Final

Martina Navratilova vs. Steffi Graf

ESPN Classic
  11:30 a.m. – 1:30 p.m. 1988 Wimbledon Ladies’ Final

Martina Navratilova vs. Steffi Graf

ESPN Classic
  1:30 – 3:30 p.m. 1988 Wimbledon Final – Gentlemen’s

Boris Becker vs. Stefan Edberg

ESPN Classic
  3:30 – 5:30 p.m. 1977 Wimbledon Final – Gentlemen’s

Bjorn Borg vs. Jimmy Connors

ESPN Classic
  5:30 – 7:30 p.m. 2012 Wimbledon Gentlemen’s Final

Roger Federer vs. Andy Murray

ESPN Classic
  7:30 – 9:30 p.m. 2012 Wimbledon Ladies’ Final

Serena Williams vs. Agnieszka Radwanska

ESPN Classic
  9:30 – 11:30 p.m. 1982 Wimbledon Final – Gentlemen’s

Jimmy Connors vs. John McEnroe

ESPN Classic
  11:30 p.m. – 1:30 a.m. 1993 Wimbledon Final – Gentlemen’s

Jim Courier vs. Pete Sampras

ESPN Classic
Tue, Jun 27 1:30 – 3:30 a.m. 1998 Wimbledon Final – Gentlemen’s

Goran Ivanisevic vs. Pete Sampras

ESPN Classic
  3:30 – 5:30 a.m. 1999 Wimbledon Ladies’ Final

Lindsay Davenport vs. Steffi Graf

ESPN Classic
  5:30 – 7:30 a.m. 2000 Wimbledon Ladies’ Final

Venus Williams vs. Lindsay Davenport

ESPN Classic
  7:30 – 9:30 a.m. 2000 Wimbledon Final – Gentlemen’s

Patrick Rafter vs. Pete Sampras

ESPN Classic
  9:30 – 11:30 a.m. 2001 Wimbledon, Round of 16 – Gentlemen’s

Roger Federer vs. Pete Sampras

ESPN Classic
  11:30 a.m. – 1:30 p.m. 2001 Wimbledon, Semifinal – Gentlemen’s

Patrick Rafter vs. Andre Agassi

ESPN Classic
  1:30 – 3:30 p.m. 2001 Wimbledon Final – Gentlemen’s

Goran Ivanisevic vs. Patrick Rafter

ESPN Classic
  3:30 – 5:30 p.m. 2002 Wimbledon Ladies’ Final

Serena Williams vs. Venus Williams

ESPN Classic
  5:30 – 7:30 p.m. 1988 Wimbledon Ladies’ Final

Martina Navratilova vs. Steffi Graf

ESPN Classic
  7:30 – 9:30 p.m. 2003 Wimbledon Final – Gentlemen’s

Roger Federer vs. Mark Philippoussis

ESPN Classic
  9:30 – 11 p.m. 2004 Wimbledon Ladies’ Final

Serena Williams vs. Maria Sharapova

ESPN Classic
  11 p.m. – 2 a.m. 2004 Wimbledon Final – Gentlemen’s

Roger Federer vs. Andy Roddick

ESPN Classic
Wed, Jun 28 2 – 4 a.m. 2005 Wimbledon Ladies’ Final

Venus Williams vs. Lindsay Davenport

ESPN Classic
  4 – 6 a.m. 2005 Wimbledon Gentlemen’s Final

Roger Federer vs. Andy Roddick

ESPN Classic
  6 – 8 a.m. 2006 Wimbledon Gentlemen’s Final

Roger Federer vs. Rafael Nadal

ESPN Classic
  8 – 11 a.m. 2007 Wimbledon Gentlemen’s Final

Roger Federer vs. Rafael Nadal

ESPN Classic
  11 a.m. – 1 p.m. 2008 Wimbledon, The Championships – Round of 16 – Gentlemen’s

Richard Gasquet vs. Andy Murray

ESPN Classic
  1 – 3 p.m. 2008 Wimbledon Ladies’ Final

Venus Williams vs. Serena Williams

ESPN Classic
  3 – 5 p.m. 2009 Wimbledon Ladies’ Semifinal

Serena Williams vs. Elena Dementieva

ESPN Classic
  5 – 10 p.m. 2009 Wimbledon Final – Gentlemen’s

Roger Federer vs. Andy Roddick

ESPN Classic
  10 – 11:30 p.m. 2010 Wimbledon Ladies’ Championship

Serena Williams vs. Vera Zvonareva

ESPN Classic
  11:30 p.m. – 1:30 a.m. 2010 Wimbledon Gentlemen’s Final

Rafael Nadal vs. Tomas Berdych

ESPN Classic
Thu, Jun 29 1:30 – 4:30 a.m. 2011 Wimbledon Gentlemen’s Quarterfinal

Roger Federer vs. Jo-Wilfried Tsonga

ESPN Classic
  4:30 – 6:30 a.m. 2011 Wimbledon Gentlemen’s Final

Rafael Nadal vs. Novak Djokovic

ESPN Classic
  6:30 – 7:30 a.m. 2011 Wimbledon Official Film ESPN Classic
  7:30 – 9:30 a.m. 2012 Wimbledon Ladies’ Final

Serena Williams vs. Agnieszka Radwanska

ESPN Classic
  9:30 – 11:30 a.m. 2012 Wimbledon Gentlemen’s Final

Roger Federer vs. Andy Murray

ESPN Classic
  11:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. 2012 Wimbledon Official Film ESPN Classic
  12:30 – 3:30 p.m. 2013 Classic’s Wimbledon Classic Matches – Gentlemen’s

Novak Djokovic vs. Andy Murray

ESPN Classic
  3:30 – 5 p.m. 2004 Wimbledon Ladies’ Final

Serena Williams vs. Maria Sharapova

ESPN Classic
  5 – 8 p.m. 2007 Wimbledon Gentlemen’s Final

Roger Federer vs. Rafael Nadal

ESPN Classic
  8 – 10 p.m. 2008 Wimbledon Ladies’ Final

Venus Williams vs. Serena Williams

ESPN Classic
  10 p.m. – 3 a.m. 2009 Wimbledon Gentlemen’s Final

Roger Federer vs. Andy Roddick

ESPN Classic
Fri, Jun 30 3 – 4:30 a.m. 2010 Wimbledon Ladies’ Championship

Serena Williams vs. Vera Zvonareva

ESPN Classic
  4:30 – 6:30 a.m. 2010 Wimbledon Gentlemen’s Final

Rafael Nadal vs. Tomas Berdych

ESPN Classic
  6:30 – 8:30 a.m. 2011 Wimbledon Gentlemen’s Final

Rafael Nadal vs. Novak Djokovic

ESPN Classic
  8:30 – 10:30 a.m. 2012 Wimbledon Ladies’ Final

Serena Williams vs. Agnieszka Radwanska

ESPN Classic
  10:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. 2012 Wimbledon Gentlemen’s Final

Roger Federer vs. Andy Murray

ESPN Classic
  12:30 – 3:30 p.m. 2013 Classic’s Wimbledon Classic Matches – Gentlemen’s

Novak Djokovic vs. Andy Murray

ESPN Classic
  3:30 – 5:30 p.m. The Championships, Wimbledon 2016: Coverage pres. by Voya Financial – Ladies’

Serena Williams vs. Angelique Kerber

ESPN Classic
  5:30 – 8 p.m. The Championships, Wimbledon 2016: Coverage pres. by Voya Financial – Gentlemen’s

Andy Murray vs. Milos Raonic

ESPN Classic
  8 – 10 p.m. 1982 Wimbledon Gentlemen’s Final

Jimmy Connors vs. John McEnroe

ESPN Classic
  10 – 11:30 p.m. 1983 Wimbledon Ladies’ Final

Martina Navratilova vs. Andrea Jaeger

ESPN Classic
  11:30 p.m. – 1 a.m. 1984 Wimbledon Final – Gentlemen’s

John McEnroe vs. Jimmy Connors

ESPN Classic
Sat, Jul 1 1 – 3 a.m. 1984 Wimbledon Ladies’ Final

Chris Evert Lloyd vs. Martina Navratilova

ESPN Classic
  3 – 5 a.m. 1985 Wimbledon Ladies’ Final

Martina Navratilova vs. Chris Evert Lloyd

ESPN Classic
  5 – 6:30 a.m. 1987 Wimbledon Ladies’ Final

Martina Navratilova vs. Steffi Graf

ESPN Classic
  6:30 – 8:30 a.m. 1988 Wimbledon Ladies’ Final

Martina Navratilova vs. Steffi Graf

ESPN Classic
  8:30 – 10:30 a.m. 1988 Wimbledon Gentlemen’s Final

Boris Becker vs. Stefan Edberg

ESPN Classic
  10:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. 1977 Wimbledon Final – Gentlemen’s

Bjorn Borg vs. Jimmy Connors

ESPN Classic
  12:30 – 2:30 p.m. 2012 Wimbledon Gentlemen’s Final

Roger Federer vs. Andy Murray

ESPN Classic
  2:30 – 4:30 p.m. 2012 Wimbledon Ladies’ Final

Serena Williams vs. Agnieszka Radwanska

ESPN Classic
  4:30 – 6:30 p.m. 1993 Wimbledon Final – Gentlemen’s

Jim Courier vs. Pete Sampras

ESPN Classic
  6:30 – 8:30 p.m. 1998 Wimbledon Final – Gentlemen’s

Goran Ivanisevic vs. Pete Sampras

ESPN Classic
  8:30 – 10:30 p.m. 1999 Wimbledon Ladies’ Final

Lindsay Davenport vs. Steffi Graf

ESPN Classic
  10:30 p.m. – 12:30 a.m. 2000 Wimbledon Ladies’ Final

Venus Williams vs. Lindsay Davenport

ESPN Classic
Sun, Jul 2 12:30 – 2:30 a.m. 2000 Wimbledon Gentlemen’s Final

Patrick Rafter vs. Pete Sampras

ESPN Classic
  2:30 – 4:30 a.m. 2001 Wimbledon, Round of 16 – Gentlemen’s

Roger Federer vs. Pete Sampras

ESPN Classic
  4:30 – 6:30 a.m. 2001 Wimbledon Gentlemen’s Semifinal

Patrick Rafter vs. Andre Agassi

ESPN Classic
  6:30 – 8:30 a.m. 2001 Wimbledon Gentlemen’s Final

Goran Ivanisevic vs. Patrick Rafter

ESPN Classic
  8:30 – 10:30 a.m. 2002 Wimbledon Ladies’ Final

Serena Williams vs. Venus Williams

ESPN Classic
  10:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. 2003 Wimbledon Final – Gentlemen’s

Roger Federer vs. Mark Philippoussis

ESPN Classic
  12:30 – 2 p.m. 2004 Wimbledon Ladies’ Final

Serena Williams vs. Maria Sharapova

ESPN Classic
  2 – 5 p.m. 2004 Wimbledon Gentlemen’s Final

Roger Federer vs. Andy Roddick

ESPN Classic
  5 – 7 p.m. 2005 Wimbledon Ladies’ Final

Venus Williams vs. Lindsay Davenport

ESPN Classic
  7 – 9 p.m. 2005 Wimbledon Gentlemen’s Final

Roger Federer vs. Andy Roddick

ESPN Classic
  9 p.m. – 12 a.m. 2013 Classic’s Wimbledon Classic Matches

Novak Djokovic vs. Andy Murray

ESPN Classic
Mon, Jul 3 12 a.m. – 1:30 a.m. 2004 Wimbledon Ladies’ Final

Serena Williams vs. Maria Sharapova

ESPN Classic
  1:30 – 3:30 a.m. The Championships, Wimbledon 2016: Coverage pres. by Voya Financial – Ladies’

Serena Williams vs. Angelique Kerber

ESPN Classic
  3:30 – 6 a.m. The Championships, Wimbledon 2016: Coverage pres. by Voya Financial – Gentlemen’s

Andy Murray vs. Milos Raonic

ESPN Classic

 

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Wimbledon Week Zero

Wimbledon Week Zero

By Wendy M. Grossman

LONDON (June, 26, 2017)For some decades now, the week of the Wimbledon qualifying tournament has been a sort of local secret. People who cared to know, could find out that the qualifying event took place at the Bank of England’s sporting grounds at Roehampton. Yes: unlike all other tournaments, at Wimbledon, you don’t get to play there until you have qualified for the main draw. Currently, that means winning three rounds that whittle the qualifying draw down from 128 to 16 eventual qualifiers. This is part of what makes it so hard for qualifiers to get past the official first week: for them winning the tournament would mean winning ten matches in a row. On the other hand, it’s also why they pose such a threat to any top player who hasn’t found their feet on grass yet this year: they are already match-tight.

 

Those who attended knew that it was a very basic experience. No stands, not much in the way of refreshments, and no published information, and the courts were all lined up in a row with no space in between – but it was free, and on a nice day you could stand next to some netting and watch the action or sprawl on the hillside for a less intimate view. I have long thought that parents with aspiring tennis professionals should take them here, rather than to a major final because for many players this is the reality: playing on a back court with no press, no attention, and probably only watched by people you’re paying to be there.

 

Even just reading the qualifying draw is an exercise in realism. This year, jostling for admission to Wimbledon’s men’s singles are Lukas Rosol, famed for appearing out of nowhere to beat Rafael Nadal in 2012; the rising young American player Taylor Fritz, seeded 21; Marcus Willis, who qualified for Wimbledon last year for the first time at 26 and won his first-round match to earn a Centre Court appearance against Roger Federer; and veteran doubles player Rajiv Ram. The pressure is least on Fritz, who, ranked 132 at age 19, didn’t miss direct entry into the main draw by much and is at the beginning of his career. For Willis, ranked 387 at 27, the 70 points he has to defend from Wimbledon 2016 represent a catastrophic slide waiting to happen.

 

All change. This year, Wimbledon qualifying is being reinvented. A somewhat modest stand has been erected on one side of one of the courts, would-be spectators must purchase tickets online for £5 each, and the BBC has begun covering a selection of matches. History will record that the first televised match from Roehampton featured Benjamin Becker, the 208-ranked 36-year-old player who in 2006 sent Andre Agassi into retirement at the US Open, versus 180-ranked 25-year-old Yasutaka Uchiyama.

 

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ESPN Adds First-Ever Televised Wimbledon Qualifying Coverage

ESPN Adds First-Ever Televised Wimbledon Qualifying

 

(May 22, 2017) In June, ESPN will cover all four days of Ladies’ and Gentlemen’s qualifying for The Championships, Wimbledon for the first time, with all-day action from one of the grass courts at the Bank of England Sports Centre in Roehampton, not far from Wimbledon and the All England Lawn Tennis Club.  Qualifying will take place Monday, June 26 – Thursday, June 29, beginning each day at 6 a.m. ET with four matches scheduled per day on ESPN3 on WatchESPN and the ESPN App.  Depending on scheduling and other circumstances, there is the possibility of adding matches to one of ESPN’s linear television networks.

 

“If you look at our history with Wimbledon and our unprecedented scheduling approach to The Championships, it should be no surprise we were very interested when The Club approached us with this opportunity to expand our relationship with their brand,” said Burke Magnus, ESPN executive vice president, programming and scheduling.  “For players, the opportunity to make the field of 128 is paramount and for qualifiers it may be the chance of a lifetime.  We look forward to presenting all the compelling storylines from the qualifiers, leading into our comprehensive coverage of The Championships beginning July 3.”

 

Last Friday, May 19, Maria Sharapova announced she would enter the qualifying for Wimbledon, in lieu of a ranking sufficient for the main draw.  The 2004 Wimbledon champion recently returned from a 15-month suspension.

 

Qualifying for Wimbledon has never before been a ticketed event, nor produced for distribution.  AELTC will produce the coverage for a global audience with its graphics and commentators.

 

Wimbledon Qualifying Basics

  • There are Gentlemen’s and Ladies’ Singles competitions where players (128 and 96, respectively) must win through three rounds to win one of the 16 Main Draw places for men, or 12 Main Draw places for women. There are also qualifying draws for Gentlemen’s and Ladies’ Doubles with four places available in the Main Draw of each event.
  • All players receive ranking points and prize money and there is more money and ranking points on offer the more matches that they win.
  • If a Main Draw player withdraws after the qualifying competition has started, his/her place in the Main Draw will be taken by a lucky loser – this is a player that lost in the final round of qualifying. These players are drawn by lot against other losers in this round.

 

ESPN & Wimbledon

ESPN has televised Wimbledon since 2003, with exclusivity in the U.S. since 2012.  ESPN’s blanket coverage – all day, every day, Monday, July 3 – Sunday, July 16 – will once again include 140 hours on ESPN and ESPN2 and 1,500 on WatchESPN with action on all 15 televised courts.  The schedule is highlighted by the unprecedented “Cross Court Coverage” the second Monday-Wednesday with all matches from the Round of 16 and the Quarterfinals on ESPN and ESPN2.  The fortnight culminates with five championships on ESPN:  the Ladies’ Singles Championship along with the Ladies’ and Gentlemens’ Doubles Championship on Saturday, July 15 and the Gentlemen’s Championship and Mixed Doubles Championship on Sunday, July 16.

 

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Rafael Nadal Extends Winning Streak to 17 to Move into Rome Quarterfinals

Rafael Nadal Extends Winning Streak to 17 to Move into Rome Quarterfinals

(May 18, 2017) Rafael Nadal’s winning streak is now up to 17. The road to Roland Garros has taken the nine-time champion to three straight clay court titles season and now Ndal is three wins away from the Rome Masters title. Nadal beat 13th seed, American Jack Sock on Thursday 6-3, 6-4 to reach the Italian Open elite eight.

 

He’ll play eighth seed Dominc Thiem in the next round for the third time in less than a month. Nadal beat the Austrian in both the Barcelona and Madrid finals.

 

“I am here to try my best,” Nadal said. “I know is a tough tournament. I don’t have an easy draw here, a tough one. From the beginning is true that what happened to Nico was very bad news, but today again, second round against Sock is a tough one, and tomorrow against Dominic, he’s the player that is having probably more success now on clay, no?

“So will be another tough battle tomorrow. I hope to be ready for that battle, and I gonna try to play my best.”

Dominic Thiem

Thiem advanced by saving two match points in a 3-6, 6-3, 7-6 (7) win over Sam Querrey.

“It’s going to be a really amazing experience for me to play him third time in a very short time,” said the Austrian.

“I mean, it has been two very good matches, Barcelona and Madrid. I hope it’s going to be a third very good one tomorrow.”

 

Four-time Roma champion, second seed Novak Djokovic advanced with a 6-4, 6-4 win over Roberto Bautista Agut. Dkokovic will face Juan Martin del Potro- the Argentine upset seventh seed. Kei Nishikori 7-6 (4), 6-3.

Another top men’s seed fell on Thursday when third seed Stan Wawrinka lost to American John Isner 7-6 (1), 6-4 to American John Isner.

“It had been a while, but I was looking forward to the match, “ Isner said. “I thought I played pretty well out there.

“It’s a situation for me where I’m going out there against the No. 3 player in the world. Maybe I have a little bit less to lose than he does.

“I went out there with the belief that if I played well and executed my game plan that I could walk off that court with a win. That’s what happened today. I served well and took my chances when I had them.

“So I was very happy with the performance.”

Venus Williams

In women’s action, Venus Williams stopped a three-match losing streak against top British player Johanna Konta 6-1, 3-6, 6-1.

“I love this tournament, and I love Rome,” Williams said. “It’s one of my favorite places on earth, so that’s one of the reasons why I have always come here.

“You know, I have had a good amount of success here. Probably sometimes that it wasn’t that great. I’d never leave Rome early; let’s put it that way. I always stay.”

Other women advancing to the final eight- second seed Karolina Pliskova over Timea Bacsinszky 6-1, 7-5, eighth seed Elina Svitolina defeated Mona Barthel 3-6, 6-0, 6-0, Kiki Bertens won 7-6 (3), 6-1 over Ekaterina Makarova.

Estonian qualifier Anett Kontaveit, who knocked out No. 1 Angelique Kerber continued her winning ways stopping 16th-seeded Mirjana Lucic-Baroni 6-1, 6-1.

Kontaveit will be battling Madrid Open champion and sixth seed Simona Halep who defeated Anastasia Pavlyuchenkova 6-1, 4-6, 6-0.

In another upset on the women’s side of the draw, qualifier Daria Gavrilova defeated seventh-seeded Svetlana Kuznetsova 2-6, 7-5, 6-4.

 

 

RESULTS – THURSDAY, 18 MAY 2017

Men’s Singles – Third Round
[2] N. Djokovic (SRB) d R. Bautista Agut (ESP) 64 64
J. Isner (USA) d [3] S. Wawrinka (SUI) 76(1) 64
[4] R. Nadal (ESP) d [13] J. Sock (USA) 63 64
[5] M. Raonic (CAN) d [12] T. Berdych (CZE) 63 62
[6] M. Cilic (CRO) d [9] D. Goffin (BEL) 63 64
J. del Potro (ARG) d [7] K. Nishikori (JPN) 76(4) 63
[8] D. Thiem (AUT) d S. Querrey (USA) 36 63 76(7) – saved 3 M.P.
[16] A. Zverev (GER) d F. Fognini (ITA) 63 63

Men’s Doubles – Second Round
[1] H. Kontinen (FIN) / J. Peers (AUS) d J. Sousa (POR) / F. Verdasco (ESP) 75 75
[2] B. Bryan (USA) / M. Bryan (USA) d A. Zverev (GER) / M. Zverev (GER) w/o (A Zverev – fatigue)
[4] P. Herbert (FRA) / N. Mahut (FRA) d B. Baker (USA) / N. Monroe (USA) 62 67(7) 12-10
[5] L. Kubot (POL) / M. Melo (BRA) d F. Mergea (ROU) / A. Qureshi (PAK) 62 63
[6] R. Klaasen (RSA) / R. Ram (USA) d O. Marach (AUT) / M. Pavic (CRO) 63 64
R. Bopanna (IND) / P. Cuevas (URU) d [7] F. Lopez (ESP) / M. Lopez (ESP) 46 76(7) 10-8

SCHEDULE – FRIDAY, 19 MAY 2017

CENTRALE start 12:00 noon
WTA – [Q] A. Kontaveit (EST) vs [6] S. Halep (ROU)
Not Before 2:00 pm
ATP – [16] A. Zverev (GER) vs [5] M. Raonic (CAN)
Not Before 4:00 pm
ATP – [8] D. Thiem (AUT) vs [4] R. Nadal (ESP)
Not Before 7:30 pm
WTA – [9] V. Williams (USA) vs [3] G. Muguruza (ESP)
Not Before 9:00 pm
ATP – J. del Potro (ARG) vs [2] N. Djokovic (SRB)

NEXT GEN ARENA start 12:00 noon
ATP – J. Isner (USA) vs [6] M. Cilic (CRO)
Not Before 2:30 pm
WTA – [15] K. Bertens (NED) vs [Q] D. Gavrilova (AUS)
Not Before 4:30 pm
WTA – [8] E. Svitolina (UKR) or [Q] M. Barthel (GER) vs T. Bacsinszky (SUI) or [2] K. Pliskova (CZE)
ATP – R. Bopanna (IND) / P. Cuevas (URU) vs [4] P. Herbert (FRA) / N. Mahut (FRA)

PIETRANGELI start 12:00 noon
ATP – [1] H. Kontinen (FIN) / J. Peers (AUS) vs [5] L. Kubot (POL) / M. Melo (BRA)
WTA – [6] A. Spears (USA) / K. Srebotnik (SLO) vs [2] Y. Chan (TPE) / M. Hingis (SUI)
ATP – [6] R. Klaasen (RSA) / R. Ram (USA) vs [2] B. Bryan (USA) / M. Bryan (USA)
ATP – J. Isner (USA) / J. Sock (USA) vs [8] I. Dodig (CRO) / M. Granollers (ESP)

COURT 1 start 1:00 pm
WTA – [4] T. Babos (HUN) / A. Hlavackova (CZE) vs K. Bondarenko (UKR) / K. Siniakova (CZE)
WTA – [WC] S. Errani (ITA) / M. Trevisan (ITA) vs [3] S. Mirza (IND) / Y. Shvedova (KAZ)
WTA – [1] E. Makarova (RUS) / E. Vesnina (RUS) vs B. Krejcikova (CZE) / S. Zheng (CHN)

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Fabio Fognini Stops No. 1 Andy Murray in Rome Second Round

Andy Murray

Fabio Fognini Stops No. 1 Andy Murray in Rome Second Round

 

(May 16, 2017) World No.1 Andy Murray will head into the French Open with few clay court wins under his belt. The three-time major winner and defending champion lost No. 29 Fabio Fognini of Italy in the second round of the Rome Masters 6-2, 6-4 much to the delight of local fans. Since winning the Dubai title in February, Murray is 5-6.

Fognini was fearless, hitting 22 winners to only four errors.

“I’m sure there were a lot of things I could have done better,” Murray said to media. “Obviously he started the match extremely well, for sure, and then, you know, mid to end part of the second set, you know, there were a few opportunities there.

“But, yeah, he was — you know, he was taking the ball early, you know, hitting the ball close to the lines and dominating most of the points.

“And then second set, you know, towards the end he starts making a few more mistakes. I was getting into it a little bit, but I wasn’t doing enough to — you know, I wasn’t creating enough chances on my own. You know, normally during matches your opponent might give you a few opportunities with some errors, and obviously you hope to create a few yourself.

“That certainly wasn’t the case today. The only chance I really got was when he was making errors.”

 

“Definitely movement the last two weeks has not been good,” Murray continued. “I felt like I moved decent in — you know, in the beginning of the year I was moving well. I moved pretty well in Monte-Carlo and Barcelona, but the last two weeks I haven’t moved well.

“You know, Fabio did play some good dropshots, but like you say, I wasn’t actually making a move or a step towards the ball.

“You know, that’s not a good sign, so that’s something, like I said, the last two years on the clay, that’s been a huge improvement for me. My movement has been a big help, you know, last couple of years, but certainly the last couple of weeks that’s been a problem. So I need to address that.”

 

No. 2 Novak Djokovic beat British qualifier Aljaz Bedene 7-6 (2), 6-2.

“Bedene is the kind of player that gives you good rhythm,” noted the Serb. “I had some good exchanges, some good games with rallies and it felt right, especially in the second set.

“Tiebreak I played a great tiebreak. Served very well when I needed to. I just — you know, I just wish that I had started a little bit sharper. But hopefully the next one will be good.”

 

A couple of ATP World Tour milestones from Tuesday – David Ferrer notched his 700th career match win on the tour while Tomas Berdych won his 600th.

 

 

INTERNAZIONALI BNL D’ITALIA – ROME, ITALY

RESULTS – MAY 16, 2017

Men’s
Singles – Second Round
F. Fognini (ITA) d [1] A. Murray (GBR) 62 64
[2] N. Djokovic (SRB) d [Q] A. Bedene (GBR) 76(2) 62
[6] M. Cilic (CRO) d R. Harrison (USA) 63 62
[9] D. Goffin (BEL) d F. Verdasco (ESP) 36 63 62
[12] T. Berdych (CZE) d [Q] C. Berlocq (ARG) 63 64
J. Isner (USA) d F. Mayer (GER) 76(4) 76(4)

Men’s
Singles – First Round
[13] J. Sock (USA) d D. Schwartzman (ARG) 64 16 75
[15] P. Carreno Busta (ESP) d G. Simon (FRA) 63 63
[16] A. Zverev (GER) d [Q] K. Anderson (RSA) 64 46 64
[PR] T. Haas (GER) d [LL] E. Escobedo (USA) 60 46 76(1)
B. Paire (FRA) d N. Mahut (FRA) 63 64
P. Cuevas (URU) d [Q] A. Mannarino (FRA) 64 76(2)
D. Ferrer (ESP) d F. Lopez (ESP) 46 63 61
R. Bautista Agut (ESP) d *[LL] A. Dolgopolov (UKR) 64 62

Men’s
Doubles – First Round
N. Mektic (CRO) / A. Ramos-Vinolas (ESP) d [WC] F. Gaio (ITA) / S. Napolitano (ITA) 76(3) 63
R. Bopanna (IND) / P. Cuevas (URU) d [WC] S. Bolelli (ITA) / A. Seppi (ITA) 64 62
B. Baker (USA) / N. Monroe (USA) d J. del Potro (ARG) / M. Matkowski (POL) 36 75 10-5

*[LL] A. Dolgopolov (UKR) replaced N. Kyrgios (AUS) – hip
Women’s
Singles – Second Round

[5] J. Konta (GBR) d Y. Putintseva (KAZ) 63 60
[7] S. Kuznetsova (RUS) d K. Siniakova (CZE) 61 76(3)
[16] M. Lucic-Baroni (CRO) d [WC] M. Sharapova (RUS) 64 36 12 Retired – left thigh injury
First Round
[Q] D. Gavrilova (AUS) d [10] M. Keys (USA) 26 75 75
J. Goerges (GER) d [13] K. Mladenovic (FRA) 76(6) 75
[15] K. Bertens (NED) d M. Niculescu (ROU) 26 62 61
[Q] A. Kontaveit (EST) d [Q] A. Petkovic (GER) 63 64
A. Sevastova (LAT) d I. Begu (ROU) 64 64
E. Makarova (RUS) d R. Vinci (ITA) 62 61
[Q] C. Bellis (USA) d M. Doi (JPN) 64 76(6)
[Q] J. Ostapenko (LAT) d S. Rogers (USA) 63 64
T. Bacsinszky (SUI) d T. Babos (HUN) 62 62
L. Davis (USA) d C. Suárez Navarro (ESP) 62 57 63

Women’s
Doubles – First Round

B. Krejcikova (CZE) / S. Zheng (CHN) d [5] K. Pliskova (CZE) / B. Strycova (CZE) 06 64 10-8
[PR] L. Arruabarrena (ESP) / A. Parra Santonja (ESP) d D. Gavrilova (AUS) / A. Pavlyuchenkova (RUS) 36 64 11-9
[WC] J. Jankovic (SRB) / A. Petkovic (GER) d [WC] D. Chiesa (ITA) / S. Rubini (ITA) 75 62
[Alt] O. Savchuk (UKR) / E. Svitolina (UKR) d S. Aoyama (JPN) / C. Liang (CHN) 64 62
E. Hozumi (JPN) / M. Kato (JPN) d S. Stosur (AUS) / S. Zhang (CHN) 62 64

ORDER OF PLAY – WEDNESDAY, MAY 17, 2017
CENTRALE start 12:00 noon
ATP – [7] K. Nishikori (JPN) vs D. Ferrer (ESP)
ATP – [Q] N. Almagro (ESP) vs [4] R. Nadal (ESP)
WTA – [1] A. Kerber (GER) vs [Q] A. Kontaveit (EST)

Not Before 7:30 pm
ATP – [3] S. Wawrinka (SUI) vs B. Paire (FRA)

Not Before 9:00 pm
WTA – [Q] J. Ostapenko (LAT) vs [3] G. Muguruza (ESP)

NEXT GEN ARENA start 11:00 am
WTA – [8] E. Svitolina (UKR) vs A. Cornet (FRA)

Not Before 12:00 noon
ATP – K. Edmund (GBR) vs J. del Potro (ARG)
WTA – L. Tsurenko (UKR) vs [9] V. Williams (USA)
ATP – [8] D. Thiem (AUT) vs P. Cuevas (URU)

Not Before 7:00 pm
ATP – [Q] J. Struff (GER) vs S. Querrey (USA)

PIETRANGELI start 11:00 am
WTA – L. Siegemund (GER) vs [6] S. Halep (ROU)
WTA – L. Davis (USA) vs [2] K. Pliskova (CZE)
ATP – V. Troicki (SRB) vs [16] A. Zverev (GER)
ATP – [PR] T. Haas (GER) vs [5] M. Raonic (CAN)

Not Before 5:00 pm
WTA – [4] D. Cibulkova (SVK) vs E. Makarova (RUS)

COURT 1 start 11:00 am
WTA – [Q] C. Bellis (USA) vs [15] K. Bertens (NED)
WTA – [Q] D. Gavrilova (AUS) vs C. Garcia (FRA)
ATP – [13] J. Sock (USA) vs J. Vesely (CZE)
ATP – [15] P. Carreno Busta (ESP) vs R. Bautista Agut (ESP)
ATP – [3] J. Murray (GBR) / B. Soares (BRA) vs J. Isner (USA) / J. Sock (USA)

COURT 2 start 11:00 am
WTA – [Q] M. Barthel (GER) vs [Q] Q. Wang (CHN)

Not Before 1:00 pm
WTA – J. Goerges (GER) vs J. Jankovic (SRB)
WTA – [14] B. Strycova (CZE) vs T. Bacsinszky (SUI)
ATP – N. Mektic (CRO) / A. Ramos-Vinolas (ESP) vs [8] I. Dodig (CRO) / M. Granollers (ESP)
WTA – [4] T. Babos (HUN) / A. Hlavackova (CZE) vs [PR] L. Arruabarrena (ESP) / A. Parra Santonja (ESP)

COURT 4 start 11:00 am
WTA – [WC] S. Errani (ITA) / M. Trevisan (ITA) vs C. Mchale (USA) / M. Niculescu (ROU)
WTA – [12] A. Pavlyuchenkova (RUS) vs A. Sevastova (LAT)
ATP – J. Sousa (POR) / F. Verdasco (ESP) vs D. Nestor (CAN) / E. Roger-Vasselin (FRA)
WTA – N. Hibino (JPN) / A. Rosolska (POL) vs [2] Y. Chan (TPE) / M. Hingis (SUI)

COURT 6 start 12:00 noon
ATP – O. Marach (AUT) / M. Pavic (CRO) vs [Alt] T. Huey (PHI) / M. Venus (NZL)
WTA – S. Kuznetsova (RUS) / K. Mladenovic (FRA) vs A. Groenefeld (GER) / K. Peschke (CZE)
WTA – After Suitable Rest – D. Jurak (CRO) / A. Rodionova (AUS) vs K. Bertens (NED) / J. Goerges (GER)

COURT 3 start 1:00 pm
WTA – K. Bondarenko (UKR) / K. Siniakova (CZE) vs [7] G. Dabrowski (CAN) / Y. Xu (CHN)
WTA – After Suitable Rest – [Alt] O. Savchuk (UKR) / E. Svitolina (UKR) vs [3] S. Mirza (IND) / Y. Shvedova (KAZ)

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Maria Sharapova Denied French Open Wild Card; Retires From Rome Match with Left Thigh Injury

Maria Sharapova Denied French Open Wild Card; Retires From Rome Match with Left Thigh Injury

(May 16, 2017) Two-time French Open champion Maria Sharapova has been denied a wild card entry into the French Open.

French Tennis Federation president Bernard Giudicelli announced the decision during a Facebook Live video broadcast.

“I just wanted to tell you that I decided not to give to Maria Sharapova a wildcard – the wildcard that she asked me,” Guidicelli said.

“Nobody can deprive her two titles she won here in Roland Garros. But those two titles she (won) them according to the rules. I really read the articles, 101, of the CAS, which reduced her sanction. However we agreed with the independent tribunal panel that she has committed a violation of the anti-doping tennis program. And she had to be suspended for 15 months.

“Today that suspension is over and she can take her path towards the new success. But if there can be a wildcard for the return from injuries, then there cannot be a wildcard for the return from doping. So it’s up to her, day after day, tournament after tournament, to find the strength to conquer more titles without hold to anybody.

“I’m very sorry for Maria, very sorry for her fans, that might be very disappointed. She might be very disappointed, but it’s my mission to protect the game, and to protect the high standards of game played without any doped on the result.”

 

Sharapova, back from a 15-month doping suspension did receive wild cards into Stuttgart, Madrid and this week’s Rome event.

The Russian’s ranking was not high enough to make the qualifying event at Roland Garros, as she was out site the top 200.

 

Sharapova lost her second round match in Rome to No. 16 seed Miriana Lucic-Baroni 6-4 3-6, 1-2,  when she was forced to retire with a left leg injury.

 

Sharapova did not have a news conference but out out the following statement:

https://i0.wp.com/pbs.twimg.com/media/C_-R92GV0AAz7CT.jpg?ssl=1

 

“I thought it was pretty good match up until the end, which was obviously weird,” said Lucic-Baroni. “You never want to finish a match like that. I mean, it’s unfortunate. I wish her a speedy recovery. I hope it’s nothing bad.

“I thought we played well. I thought I played really well first set. Just kind of that one game where I made two double faults in a row in the second set to lose my serve. I kind of let it slip away a little bit the match from there.

“Yeah, that was my bad, but she’s a great player. She keeps that pressure on you and sometimes things like that happen.”

Asked about the decision of the French Open not to give Sharapova a wild card, Lucic-Baroni said:

“I am very much against doping of any kind. Very much. I feel like if you’re going to invest — like I think they are doing a million and a half or something, and if you want to give a wildcard to a person — nothing against Maria personally, nothing — but if you’re going to invest million and a half or 7 million into more doping tests and then you’re going to give a wildcard, it’s just — I think they would probably like to have her there, but they just can’t.

“And what is the point? What is the point of all this? What is the point of doing more tests if you award that?

“I think she’s a great player. I think she will come back. There is no doubt. She’s a great competitor.

“But you want to talk about proper and proper rules, and we are a tour that’s been a tour for a long time, the fact that there isn’t a rule on people who failed doping tests, and whether or not they can get a wildcard, whether or not they should, it’s a very strange thing because we are professional, and that should be in place.

“So I feel that it is the right decision. It is the correct decision. I feel it is, let’s say, brave of them, because everybody is pressured. People want to see Maria. That’s fine.

“But, you know, you have to do — if you want to do the right thing, you have to do the right thing. If you want to invest more money in doping tests, then you can’t award a person who failed a doping test no matter how you guys want to wrap it up and make it sound pretty, and it’s a mistake.

“You can do whatever you want to say. You fail a doping, you fail a doping. That’s it. I think there is — it’s really black and white. You guys make it, you know… It doesn’t go into my bank account or from it, so I can say honestly what I think.

“For some other people that write about it, maybe it affects their bank account. Maybe they have to write whatever they have to write. But this is black and white. There is no — there is no gray area. It’s simple. That’s the way I see it.”

 

Sharapova’s ranking, which was outside the top 200 coming into this week, is not high enough to be able to play the qualifying at Roland Garros. The French Open main draw begins on May 28.

 

 

 

INTERNAZIONALI BNL D’ITALIA – ROME, ITALY

 

RESULTS – MAY 16, 2017

Men’s
Singles – Second Round
F. Fognini (ITA) d [1] A. Murray (GBR) 62 64
[2] N. Djokovic (SRB) d [Q] A. Bedene (GBR) 76(2) 62
[6] M. Cilic (CRO) d R. Harrison (USA) 63 62
[9] D. Goffin (BEL) d F. Verdasco (ESP) 36 63 62
[12] T. Berdych (CZE) d [Q] C. Berlocq (ARG) 63 64
J. Isner (USA) d F. Mayer (GER) 76(4) 76(4)

Men’s
Singles – First Round
[13] J. Sock (USA) d D. Schwartzman (ARG) 64 16 75
[15] P. Carreno Busta (ESP) d G. Simon (FRA) 63 63
[16] A. Zverev (GER) d [Q] K. Anderson (RSA) 64 46 64
[PR] T. Haas (GER) d [LL] E. Escobedo (USA) 60 46 76(1)
B. Paire (FRA) d N. Mahut (FRA) 63 64
P. Cuevas (URU) d [Q] A. Mannarino (FRA) 64 76(2)
D. Ferrer (ESP) d F. Lopez (ESP) 46 63 61
R. Bautista Agut (ESP) d *[LL] A. Dolgopolov (UKR) 64 62

Men’s
Doubles – First Round
N. Mektic (CRO) / A. Ramos-Vinolas (ESP) d [WC] F. Gaio (ITA) / S. Napolitano (ITA) 76(3) 63
R. Bopanna (IND) / P. Cuevas (URU) d [WC] S. Bolelli (ITA) / A. Seppi (ITA) 64 62
B. Baker (USA) / N. Monroe (USA) d J. del Potro (ARG) / M. Matkowski (POL) 36 75 10-5

*[LL] A. Dolgopolov (UKR) replaced N. Kyrgios (AUS) – hip
Women’s
Singles – Second Round

[5] J. Konta (GBR) d Y. Putintseva (KAZ) 63 60
[7] S. Kuznetsova (RUS) d K. Siniakova (CZE) 61 76(3)
[16] M. Lucic-Baroni (CRO) d [WC] M. Sharapova (RUS) 64 36 12 Retired – left thigh injury
First Round
[Q] D. Gavrilova (AUS) d [10] M. Keys (USA) 26 75 75
J. Goerges (GER) d [13] K. Mladenovic (FRA) 76(6) 75
[15] K. Bertens (NED) d M. Niculescu (ROU) 26 62 61
[Q] A. Kontaveit (EST) d [Q] A. Petkovic (GER) 63 64
A. Sevastova (LAT) d I. Begu (ROU) 64 64
E. Makarova (RUS) d R. Vinci (ITA) 62 61
[Q] C. Bellis (USA) d M. Doi (JPN) 64 76(6)
[Q] J. Ostapenko (LAT) d S. Rogers (USA) 63 64
T. Bacsinszky (SUI) d T. Babos (HUN) 62 62
L. Davis (USA) d C. Suárez Navarro (ESP) 62 57 63

Women’s
Doubles – First Round

B. Krejcikova (CZE) / S. Zheng (CHN) d [5] K. Pliskova (CZE) / B. Strycova (CZE) 06 64 10-8
[PR] L. Arruabarrena (ESP) / A. Parra Santonja (ESP) d D. Gavrilova (AUS) / A. Pavlyuchenkova (RUS) 36 64 11-9
[WC] J. Jankovic (SRB) / A. Petkovic (GER) d [WC] D. Chiesa (ITA) / S. Rubini (ITA) 75 62
[Alt] O. Savchuk (UKR) / E. Svitolina (UKR) d S. Aoyama (JPN) / C. Liang (CHN) 64 62
E. Hozumi (JPN) / M. Kato (JPN) d S. Stosur (AUS) / S. Zhang (CHN) 62 64

ORDER OF PLAY – WEDNESDAY, MAY 17, 2017
CENTRALE start 12:00 noon
ATP – [7] K. Nishikori (JPN) vs D. Ferrer (ESP)
ATP – [Q] N. Almagro (ESP) vs [4] R. Nadal (ESP)
WTA – [1] A. Kerber (GER) vs [Q] A. Kontaveit (EST)

Not Before 7:30 pm
ATP – [3] S. Wawrinka (SUI) vs B. Paire (FRA)

Not Before 9:00 pm
WTA – [Q] J. Ostapenko (LAT) vs [3] G. Muguruza (ESP)

NEXT GEN ARENA start 11:00 am
WTA – [8] E. Svitolina (UKR) vs A. Cornet (FRA)

Not Before 12:00 noon
ATP – K. Edmund (GBR) vs J. del Potro (ARG)
WTA – L. Tsurenko (UKR) vs [9] V. Williams (USA)
ATP – [8] D. Thiem (AUT) vs P. Cuevas (URU)

Not Before 7:00 pm
ATP – [Q] J. Struff (GER) vs S. Querrey (USA)

PIETRANGELI start 11:00 am
WTA – L. Siegemund (GER) vs [6] S. Halep (ROU)
WTA – L. Davis (USA) vs [2] K. Pliskova (CZE)
ATP – V. Troicki (SRB) vs [16] A. Zverev (GER)
ATP – [PR] T. Haas (GER) vs [5] M. Raonic (CAN)

Not Before 5:00 pm
WTA – [4] D. Cibulkova (SVK) vs E. Makarova (RUS)

COURT 1 start 11:00 am
WTA – [Q] C. Bellis (USA) vs [15] K. Bertens (NED)
WTA – [Q] D. Gavrilova (AUS) vs C. Garcia (FRA)
ATP – [13] J. Sock (USA) vs J. Vesely (CZE)
ATP – [15] P. Carreno Busta (ESP) vs R. Bautista Agut (ESP)
ATP – [3] J. Murray (GBR) / B. Soares (BRA) vs J. Isner (USA) / J. Sock (USA)

COURT 2 start 11:00 am
WTA – [Q] M. Barthel (GER) vs [Q] Q. Wang (CHN)

Not Before 1:00 pm
WTA – J. Goerges (GER) vs J. Jankovic (SRB)
WTA – [14] B. Strycova (CZE) vs T. Bacsinszky (SUI)
ATP – N. Mektic (CRO) / A. Ramos-Vinolas (ESP) vs [8] I. Dodig (CRO) / M. Granollers (ESP)
WTA – [4] T. Babos (HUN) / A. Hlavackova (CZE) vs [PR] L. Arruabarrena (ESP) / A. Parra Santonja (ESP)

COURT 4 start 11:00 am
WTA – [WC] S. Errani (ITA) / M. Trevisan (ITA) vs C. Mchale (USA) / M. Niculescu (ROU)
WTA – [12] A. Pavlyuchenkova (RUS) vs A. Sevastova (LAT)
ATP – J. Sousa (POR) / F. Verdasco (ESP) vs D. Nestor (CAN) / E. Roger-Vasselin (FRA)
WTA – N. Hibino (JPN) / A. Rosolska (POL) vs [2] Y. Chan (TPE) / M. Hingis (SUI)

COURT 6 start 12:00 noon
ATP – O. Marach (AUT) / M. Pavic (CRO) vs [Alt] T. Huey (PHI) / M. Venus (NZL)
WTA – S. Kuznetsova (RUS) / K. Mladenovic (FRA) vs A. Groenefeld (GER) / K. Peschke (CZE)
WTA – After Suitable Rest – D. Jurak (CRO) / A. Rodionova (AUS) vs K. Bertens (NED) / J. Goerges (GER)

COURT 3 start 1:00 pm
WTA – K. Bondarenko (UKR) / K. Siniakova (CZE) vs [7] G. Dabrowski (CAN) / Y. Xu (CHN)
WTA – After Suitable Rest – [Alt] O. Savchuk (UKR) / E. Svitolina (UKR) vs [3] S. Mirza (IND) / Y. Shvedova (KAZ)

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